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Iraq Conflict

Iconic Images - 20 Mar 2013
A selection of iconic images from the U.S.- led invasion of Iraq . The war started on March 20 Baghdad local time, March 19 Washington
D.C. local time.
A decade after U.S. and Western troops swept Saddam Hussein from power, Iraq still struggles with insurgents, sectarian
friction and political feuds among Shi'ite, Sunni and Kurdish factions who share power in the government of Shi'ite Prime Minister Nuri
al-Maliki.
IRAQ USA
RTRLOLC
March 17, 2004
U.S. Marine Corp Assaultman Kirk Dalrymple watches as a statue of Iraq's President Saddam Hussein falls...
Baghdad, Iraq - Republic of
FILE PHOTO OF US MARINE WATCHES AS STATUE OF SADDAM HUSSEIN FALLS IN CENTRAL BAGHDAD.
U.S. Marine Corp Assaultman Kirk Dalrymple watches as a statue of Iraq's President Saddam Hussein falls in central Baghdad's Firdaus Square, in this file photo from April 9, 2003. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

“I woke up around 6am and started driving around Baghdad. The Americans had captured most of the city already. I went to the hospital to see my colleague Samia Nakhoul, who was injured in the U.S. firing on the Palestine hotel that also killed my colleague and friend Taras Protsyuk the day before. I came back to our hotel, which was surrounded by Americans, to file some pictures.
Francesca, one of our London editors, called me and told me the Saddam statue was coming down. I went down there and took pictures of this guy looking at the statue. I came closer to him and had the perfect picture – a U.S. Marine looking at a statue pulled down by Americans. I didn’t expect this picture to be in so many publications. I was contacted once by the Lieutenant in the picture asking for the original file but unfortunately I lost his email contact. If he sees this post, I’d kindly ask him to contact me.”
MIDEAST
RTRKKEY
March 21, 2003
An explosion rocks Baghdad during air strikes March 21, 2003. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
“I waited all...
Baghdad
EXPLOSIONS IN BAGHDAD DURING AIR STRIKES.
An explosion rocks Baghdad during air strikes March 21, 2003. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
“I waited all night for the first strike on Baghdad. Two nights later there was a massive bombing, and that’s when I took this photo. I remember Iraqi troops came into the Palestine hotel, where most journalists were staying, looking for disks and tapes showing the bombing. They searched other journalists, but not me. I’m not sure why they didn’t search me perhaps because I tried to be nice to them.”
IRAQ
RTX4W46
December 20, 2007
U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman HM1 Richard Barnett, assigned to the 1st Marine Division, holds an Iraqi...
Iraq, Iraq
U.S. Marine holds Iraqi child after crossfire ripped apart family in central Iraq
U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman HM1 Richard Barnett, assigned to the 1st Marine Division, holds an Iraqi child in central Iraq March 29, 2003 . REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“This is my most published picture from the Iraq war. The caption says ‘a medic holds a child after the confused front line crossfire ripped apart an Iraqi family after local soldiers appeared to force civilians towards U.S. Marine positions.’ That’s as much as I knew at the moment that I sent the picture to the Reuters desk. Ten years later I know a bit more about the child and her family as some papers and magazines followed the story but not much more about the sad incident that happened that day. It was supposed to be a day off for the Marines on their way to Baghdad – the small base was built overnight by the road “somewhere in central Iraq” and everyone was busy cleaning or fixing their gear or just resting.
I was resting in my fox hole with a broken foot when the frantic firefight broke out – small weapons and some heavy machinegun were fired at the edge of a camp. After maybe 15 minutes (maybe more but it looked like five, really) the whole situation was over. What exactly happened I don’t know nor will I ever know but there were dead bodies around a dark brown bullet-ridden Russian made car, several wounded people crying for help and some armed men captured in a field outside a base.

Apparently local gunmen in a military truck, whoever that might have been, were chasing a car full of civilians or forcing them somehow towards the small military base. Marines reacted as Marines usually react in such situations - they opened fire.

Soon after I sent my pictures, the Marine convoy was on the road again. The picture lived its life that I could control very little of – printed, celebrated, discussed and taken out of and back into context. Some people wanted to know what happened to the girl, others were interested in what the doctor in the picture felt while holding a child.”
IRAQ
RTR1ACW7
October 14, 2005
An Iraqi man suspected of having explosives in his car is held after being arrested by the U.S army near...
Baquba
An Iraqi man suspected of carrying explosives in his car is held near a polling station near Baquba
An Iraqi man suspected of having explosives in his car is held after being arrested by the U.S army near Baquba, Iraq, October 15, 2005. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

“It was referendum day when the people would decide on the country's controversial new post-Saddam Hussein's constitution. Providing security during the historic referendum and keeping the voting stations safe was a key issue for U.S.-led forces in order to validate the referendum results.
Baquba had emerged as one of the heaviest guerrilla enclaves, only 30 miles northeast of Baghdad. Several bans where announced for that day after Sunni groups urged a boycott of the vote. A gathering of more than five men was not allowed, and a driving ban for all non-military or police vehicles applied. Since early morning I was on patrol with a company, visiting polling station. The day was tense. Suddenly we ran into an old red car driving fast just in front of us. When the driver saw the army caravan, he turned around and accelerated, and a pursuit began. He drove off the road onto a dusty path which as we advanced narrowed into a wheat field. The path was difficult to navigate for the size of the hummers, and it began to look like a trap. After some minutes of pursuit, with our vehicle almost stuck in the path the soldiers became very nervous, one of them started screaming: 'It’s an ambush, it’s an ambush”. The vehicle was intercepted some 100 yards in front of us by another hummer who drove on an alternate path. When I reached the car, he was already being blindfold, and sitting on the back of the truck, he was praying aloud, a U.S. captain approached him and was reflected in the window. He asked the translator what he was saying. “He's asking God to save him,” the translator said. The answer triggered laughter from the soldiers. At the same time a helicopter flew over us, they turned their heads looking for it. The man was arrested under the accusation of having explosives in his car. But nothing was found in his vehicle. He said he didn't know anything about the ban or the referendum. I never knew what happened to this man.
At the end of the day, five US soldiers were killed in a roadside bombing in a nearby village.The next day, the U.S. bombed the area saying 70 militia members were killed. Witnesses said several of the casualties were civilians.” HIGHEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
IRAQ
RTXLV5S
March 29, 2003
An Iraqi girl holds her sister as she waits for her mother (R) to bring over food bought in Basra March...
Basra, Iraq
An Iraqi girl holds her sister as she waits for her mother (R) to bring over food bought in Basra Ma.....
An Iraqi girl holds her sister as she waits for her mother (R) to bring over food bought in Basra March 29, 2003. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen

“At the end of March the British 7th Armoured Brigade was pushing its way into Basra. I spent my time alongside a cameraman and a journalist in the desert around Basra and Umm, the Southern Iraqi port. We slept alongside the Australian and U.S. Army in the post area. Our days consisted of making trips to the so-called frontline of Basra and the way leading to Najaf.
One day, early in the morning I was at the bridge leading into Basra as big clouds of black smoke rose from areas in the city which were on fire from the shelling and bombardments. People were fleeing the city and there were chaotic scenes with all men from the age of 16 up to 80 strip-searched by British soldiers on the highway, along with all cars and other vehicles. I photographed these scenes when I spotted a young girl holding her baby sister wearing a bright red jacket. This jacket stood out in the dark, moody and almost apocalyptic scene. I felt the girls were waiting for. After shooting a few pictures and hanging around for a while I saw a woman dressed in traditional black dress carrying a big sack on her head containing food and personal belongings. I photographed this scene as well and it turned out to be the girls’ mother who went back into Basra to get these items and move on to the next safe town. A few days later Basra was freed and people could return to their houses or what was left of them.”
NAJAF
RTR8VDZ
August 17, 2004
Mays, a young Iraqi Shi'ite girl, cries after a mortar shell which landed outside the family's home in...
Najaf
Young Iraqi girl cries after mortar shell injured her uncle in Najaf.
Mays, a young Iraqi Shi'ite girl, cries after a mortar shell which landed outside the family's home in a Najaf residential area injured her uncle August 18, 2004. REUTERS/Ali Jasim
“A young girl cried after her uncle was wounded when shells landed near her home, during armed clashes between U.S. forces and the Mahdi Army. The child's home was near where I live.
As I was working, shells were fired at the hospital. It was full of many wounded and the bodies were scattered in the corridors and chambers. The conditions were so dangerous in the area that a U.S. sniper was targeting anyone moving on the streets. Missiles and bullets were fired by both sides. The conflict turned the city into a battlefield. Movement within the city was almost impossible during the clashes.”
IRAQ/
RTR1SKR8
August 06, 2007
An Iraqi woman tries to explain that she has nothing to do with illegal fuel as soldiers from the 2nd...
Baghdad, Iraq
An Iraqi woman tries to explain that she has nothing to do with illegal fuel in Baghdad
An Iraqi woman tries to explain that she has nothing to do with illegal fuel as soldiers from the 2nd battalion, 32nd Field Artillery brigade patrol search for illegal fuel sellers in Baghdad August 6, 2007. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“2007 was the year of endless patrols, roadside bombs and open animosity towards U.S. troops in many areas of Iraq. My days in Baghdad with the soldiers of the artillery brigade I was embedded with that summer were spent mostly inside their base or patrolling in armored vehicles through the city.
Not very often the convoy would stop and I had a chance to take a few pictures of soldiers chasing another “high priority target”.
In this picture, in a very rare interaction between civilians and soldier in those days, an Iraqi woman was trying to convince soldiers she had nothing to do with illegal fuel that was sold on the streets. They let her go.”
IRAQ/
RTR1RASU
June 29, 2007
An Iraqi girl holds her hands up while U.S. and Iraqi soldiers search her family house in Baquba early...
Baquba, Iraq
An Iraqi girl holds hands up while U.S. and Iraqi soldiers search her family house in Baquba
An Iraqi girl holds her hands up while U.S. and Iraqi soldiers search her family house in Baquba early June 30, 2007. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

“During a night raid in Baquba, U.S. soldiers searched a house they believed to be full of weapons. This girl raised her hands for a short moment as one of the soldiers entered the room. It was her immediate reaction. I try to always go in with the first soldiers as I never like to shoot pictures from the back. “
IRAQ BAGHDAD
RTRLW2H
April 14, 2003
US Marines kick in a door while securing a building next to the main hospital in central Baghdad April...
Baghdad, Iraq - Republic of
US MARINES KICK IN A DOOR WHILE SECURING A BUILDING NEXT TO THE MAIN HOSPITAL IN CENTRAL BAGHDAD.
US Marines kick in a door while securing a building next to the main hospital in central Baghdad April 15, 2003, which will be used as a temporary Iraqi police headquarters. Thousands of guerrillas, including Iraqis loyal to Saddam Hussein and foreign fighters, pose a threat to U.S. troops and complicate efforts to bring stability to postwar Iraq, defense officials said on Tuesday. "There are still hazards lingering throughout the country of Iraq," Brig. Gen. Vincent Brooks told a briefing in Qatar. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen

“When I arrived in Baghdad, after spending a month in southern Iraq, it was still possible to go out on your own without security personnel. First I took a look at the local hospital and after spending some time there I strolled around the premises of the hospital. I stumbled upon a group of Marines who were securing the buildings around the hospital and looking for possible collaborators and or Iraqi soldiers/snipers hiding in the high rises next to the hospital. The Marines were searching the buildings thoroughly and opening each and every room by kicking in the doors. Beside the search for people they also went through all the paper work and personal belongings left behind.”
BAGHDAD
RTRJPVT
May 16, 2004
An Iraqi detainee gestures toward U.S. soldiers through bars of his cell at Abu Ghraib prison outside...
DETAINEE GESTURES TOWARD U.S. SOLDIER THROUGH BARS OF HIS CELL AT ABU GHRAIB PRISON OUTSIDE BAGHDAD.
An Iraqi detainee gestures toward U.S. soldiers through bars of his cell at Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad May 17, 2004. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“Abu Ghraib and the scandal with Iraqi prisoners being tortured was probably the biggest single story after the U.S. troops captured Baghdad. It was not the first time this prison was in the news –it was the most notorious jail during Saddam’s rule and we had already seen pictures of the execution chambers that hinted at the horror of the place.But, this was different and in my opinion, now from the distance of almost a decade, one of the most important moments that shaped the bloody war.
Naturally and unfortunately, it was not easy to cover the story. It was close to impossible and very dangerous. Our requests to get inside the prison were swiftly refused before we could even explain why and what we want to do. Outside the prison and over thick layers of razor wire protecting Abu Ghraib, families and some very angry Iraqi people gathered daily to protest against what was happening inside. Tensions were super high and fingers very nervously on the trigger. Reuters cameraman Mazen Dana was shot dead by a U.S. soldier outside Abu Ghraib as he was filming.
All I could do, and that proved to be right thing, was to camp at the gates of the prison complex taking some easy pictures and hoping to have a chance to get in. To my surprise, one of the visiting delegations (it was some British parliamentarians and NGOs, if I remember correctly) agreed to take me into the prison with their convoy. The soldiers inside, confused by the whole scandal, were much easier to work with than those outside protecting Abu Ghraib.
I had a few quick minutes to shoot pictures inside the prison, including in the block where those famous “happy snaps” came from. At one moment, as I was taking photos of empty corridors, a hand of an Iraqi prisoner came from behind the bars. I snapped a few frames.”
IRAQ/
RTR1MB5R
February 12, 2007
A man runs down a street warning people to flee shortly after a twin car bomb attack at Shorja market...
Baghdad, Iraq
A man runs down a street warning people to flee shortly after a twin car bomb attack at Shorja market...
A man runs down a street warning people to flee shortly after a twin car bomb attack at Shorja market in Baghdad February 12, 2007. REUTERS/Ceerwan Aziz

The first thing that I think about when I head to a blast scene is the difficulties that I will face on the way to the scene while covering an event in a place that I do not know how dangerous it is. All the difficulties prompted me to ask myself many questions and at the same time I tried to have answers. The first moments were of shock. Destruction and bodies lay on the ground at the scene as everybody ran for cover. I walked among them to do my job. I tried to be cool and neutral to convey the whole scene and to shoot the pictures that I needed as a journalist who reports the facts.
When I arrived at the Shorja market where the car bomb exploded, I saw the destruction caused by the explosion of a truck laden with explosive materials. A young man cried loudly, asking people to help him in evacuating victims. His expression represented all the struggles and stories of those fallen in the attack. The picture expressed honestly the destruction and pain of the place.”
BUSH-IRAQ/
RTR1TE6I
September 02, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush (L) walks in front of Humvees with Defense Secretary Robert Gates (C) and...
Al-Asad, Iraq
U.S. President George W. Bush walks with Gates and Rice in Al-Asad
U.S. President George W. Bush (L) walks in front of Humvees with Defense Secretary Robert Gates (C) and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice following remarks to the press after nightfall at Al-Asad airbase in Anbar Province September 3, 2007. REUTERS/Jason Reed

This picture was taken under the cover of darkness at an airbase in Anbar Province in the Iraq desert, on one of those secretive trips where you are told by a White House official to be at Andrews Air Force Base at a certain time on a particular day. No other details are given. You show up, surrender your cameras and communication devices until Air Force One is in the air, and then find out we are on a top secret trip to Iraq. No one back in Washington knew the President had even left the White House grounds until the travelling journalists with Bush broke news that we had landed at Al-Asad Airbase. This was really one of the only pictures that showed Bush in-country. I recall all the others featured meetings with Iraq leaders in air conditioned rooms on the base and I knew that Bush's brief remarks to the press outdoors were going to be the only opportunity to get something good. The sun was setting and we all wished for Bush to be seen in some natural light but we had to make do. The Hummvee vehicles were lit by one single floodlight and as Bush walked away from his remarks, I walked alongside with a then-new 50mm 1.2 lens and an original 5D camera, shooting it wide open in the dim light to get a shutter speed fast enough to capture the moment.
My editors back in Washington and New York, who were calling and emailing for hours during our communication blackout to see if I was indeed on the trip, were relieved to see my pictures start coming in over the wires before we lifted off to Australia for the annual APEC meeting. I was more relieved when they called again to let me know that this image made the front of the New York Times, nice and big.”
IRAQ/
RTR2V8N3
December 14, 2011
U.S. Air Force Major Stacie Shafran carries her luggage to a loading paddock while waiting for her departure...
Baghdad, Iraq
U.S. Air Force Major Stacie Shafran carries her luggage to a loading paddock while waiting for her departure...
U.S. Air Force Major Stacie Shafran carries her luggage to a loading paddock while waiting for her departure from Iraq at the former U.S. Sather Air Base near Baghdad, Iraq December 14, 2011. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
“I was in Iraq covering the final withdrawal of the U.S. troops for three weeks based out of the Baghdad bureau. I began an embed with the U.S. Air Force after a ceremonial closing at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center where a lot of the remaining U.S. Air Force members were stationed. I remember that day particularly because I almost didn’t make it inside the Green Zone to be transported via helicopter to the facility due to the numerous check points and hassles getting around. That time period in Iraq was very difficult because the checkpoints being handled by Iraqi security forces required a lot of persuasion and often luck to make it through checkpoints.
I remember the mood around the base and the sense of relief among the soldiers. I was looking for that “last one leaving” kind of image and this picture demonstrated that feeling of finally heading home. For me, personally, I remember it because I had spent close to 10 days in the Baghdad bureau doing day trips to bases and trying to cover daily life in Baghdad, something very difficult to do as a Westerner because of safety concerns. I was withdrawing with these soldiers leaving Iraq en route to Kuwait and eventually heading home myself.”
POY
RTRIEMV
November 10, 2004
U.S. Marines carry an injured colleague to a helicopter near the city of Falluja, November 10, 2004....
Falluja, Iraq
U.S. Marines carry injured colleague to a helicopter near Falluja.
U.S. Marines carry an injured colleague to a helicopter near the city of Falluja, November 10, 2004. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte

“I was sitting with a crew of soldiers playing cards next to military tanks. It was a boring day with nothing to do - just another day during my embed with the U.S. Marines from Charlie Company.
That crew was in charge of giving water and supplies to the soldiers who were inside Falluja, where there was heavy fighting. Many people died and many soldiers were injured. They went house by house looking for rebels.
Suddenly one mortar landed next to us, and we heard a very loud explosion. Nobody understood what happened in that moment, everybody jumped under the military vehicles. Those were scary seconds; you don't have too much time to react.
And then after 15 seconds another one. That one landed 50 yards from us – close enough for us to see how another crew of soldiers in front of us were blown to pieces. For my job I have seen many dead bodies and blood but this was my first time seeing how people disappeared into pieces - heads, arms, legs.

Everybody was completely paralyzed. U.S. Master Sergeant Roy Meek from Charlie Company, screamed so loudly “This is Iraq, move!” And all the soldiers ran. I started to take pictures from where we were. They didn’t let me move closer, the scene was really dramatic, Dante-esque. The only pictures were the soldiers carrying their colleagues, all of them trying to do something. The helicopters arrived so quickly. In the end, eight soldiers died - soldiers, young people, looking for a place to work in the army, without any experience in war.
This was one of the worse days of my life. You can lose everything in just one second.”
IRAQ
RTRK9BI
March 18, 2003
An Iraqi woman watches U.N. weapons inspectors leave Saddam airport in Baghdad March 18, 2003. REUTERS/Goran...
Baghdad
AN IRAQI WOMAN WATCHES U.N. WEAPONS INSPECTORS LEAVE SADDAM AIRPORT IN BAGHDAD.
An Iraqi woman watches U.N. weapons inspectors leave Saddam airport in Baghdad March 18, 2003. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

“It was the day that the U.N. withdrew from Iraq. This Iraqi woman watched as U.N. staff entered the plane. The Iraqi people seemed sure that an attack was coming. They expected bad things to happen.”
IRAQ
RTXMAO5
November 13, 2003
A soldier of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) searches through dense vegetation...
Baquba, Iraq
A soldier of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) searches through dense vegetat.....
A soldier of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) searches through dense vegetation around the Diala river where Iraqi militants are hiding outside Baquba early November 13, 2003. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“It started as just another regular night raid outside Baquba. But, something went wrong and men that U.S soldiers were after escaped from their houses just before they were raided. The men were obviously important targets (one was apparently the executioner for the Saddam regime) and the commander of the unit I was embedded with decided to chase them. The chase went through the villages into the dense vegetation around the Diala river. I thought it was not such a great idea to follow soldiers into the grass and instead I just stayed on the little hill above the river from where I shot this picture. Later in the base (no one was captured during the raid, target escaped) I edited what I shot. This picture I saved as lost.jpg and that is exactly how I saw it at the time – a soldier lost in unknown and very hostile territory but very determined to capture something he was not exactly sure what is it.”
IRAQ/
RTX7CR2
June 25, 2008
An Iraqi baby lies in a cradle while a woman argues with U.S. soldiers of 1/8 Bravo Company searching...
Mosul, Iraq
An Iraqi baby lies in a cradle while a woman argues with U.S. soldiers of 1/8 Bravo Company on a foot...
An Iraqi baby lies in a cradle while a woman argues with U.S. soldiers of 1/8 Bravo Company searching for weapons, explosives and information about militants in the area during a foot patrol in a neighbourhood of Mosul June 26, 2008. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

“I went on patrol with U.S. soldiers of 1/8 Bravo Company. We were still keeping an eye on houses where possible insurgents could be producing homemade IED's for rebels in Iraq. We went almost house by house searching for explosives but nothing showed up. After a few hours we arrived at this house where some women were meeting and taking care of their children. As soon as the women saw the soldiers invading their home, they got scared. I think all of us got scared at that moment. Probably it was because of all the screams of some children and some women. A few seconds later the whole place paused and was silent. I saw this little baby in that position, held in what I assume was a handmade cradle. It was a moment of impact for me with all that was happening at that moment. When I see this picture, I feel sad for all those people affected by a local, international or even global conflict that nobody wanted to be involved in.”
IRAQ/
RTR1TFQ3
September 03, 2007
U.S. soldiers blindfold an Iraqi man after arresting him during a night patrol at the Zafraniya neighborhood,...
Baghdad, Iraq
U.S. soldiers blindfold an Iraqi man after arresting him during a night patrol at the Zafraniya neighborhood,...
U.S. soldiers blindfold an Iraqi man after arresting him during a night patrol at the Zafraniya neighborhood, southeast of Baghdad September 4, 2007. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

“During my second trip to Iraq in 2007 I was embedded with a U.S. Army unit that mostly operated through the night. The mission of this unit was to approach areas where intelligence reports indicated insurgents were operating, then arrest suspects and question them. One night soldiers arrived at the entrance of a local hospital in the Zafraniya neighborhood in the southeast of Baghdad. They approached a man acting suspiciously. Soldiers surrounded the man and arrested him. They put handcuffs on him and a soldier covered his eyes with a bandana. The man looked disoriented.”
IRAQ
RTR6NTB
November 11, 2003
An assault team member of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) carries a crying Iraqi...
U.S. SOLDIERS CARRIES CRYING CHILD OUT OF HOUSE DURING A RAID IN GRITZ.
An assault team member of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) carries a crying Iraqi child out of a house during a pre-dawn raid in the village of Gritz, south of Baquba November 11, 2003. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
“Soldiers of the 4th Infantry division were particularly nervous these days – their base was rocketed, their vehicles attacked constantly in Baquba, the ugly town far from everything. Journalists embedded with the unit were not much happier either – for me, that was one of the dullest embeds ever. Time was spent eating and reading and waiting for the night raids with an occasional game of basketball in the meantime. Mortar rounds and some weird rockets landed from time to time inside the camp, just as a reminder where we were.
Raids would be often cancelled – sometimes due to too much dust in the air, sometimes because of the fear of roadside bombs – and we would go back to our books and hamburgers. When they happened, the raids were very quick – if everything went smoothly and without shooting, half an hour after invading the village troops would be speeding back to their base.
This raid was smooth. Naturally, the assault team went into the targeted house first. Others, including me, nervously waited outside the house to see, actually to hear, how the raid went. As we waited, one of the soldiers ran from inside the house carrying a child. The kid was crying and his screams gave me just enough time to get my camera up. The picture is blurred not because I wanted it to be blurred but because everything happened too quickly for me to set-up my camera better.
A few more kids were brought out from the house, followed by terrified women in their night robes. Wrapped in blankets, women and children watched as soldiers collected an arsenal of weapons found in the house and took their men away.”
USA/
RTR2KZAL
April 07, 2011
Staff Sgt. Keith Fidler kisses his wife Cynthia, as their son Kolin looks on, during a homecoming ceremony...
New York, UNITED STATES
Staff Sgt. Keith Fidler kisses his wife Cynthia during a homecoming ceremony in New York
Staff Sgt. Keith Fidler kisses his wife Cynthia, as their son Kolin looks on, during a homecoming ceremony in New York, April 8, 2011 for the New York Army National Guard's 442nd Military Police Company's return from Iraq. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

For some time I had been covering homecoming stories hoping for that picture of the soldier coming home to his or her wife and baby. This was one of those days that I went to cover the assignment hoping for that to happen and the photo God’s blessed me. It was a nice moment that was genuine and worth the wait. Watching them leave the Armory filled with such joy was good for the soul.”
IRAQ/
RTR1QRHU
June 12, 2007
U.S. soldiers push the car of an Iraqi man to start the engine at a check point in north Baghdad June...
Baghdad, Iraq
U.S. soldiers push the car of an Iraqi man to start the engine at a check point in north Baghdad
U.S. soldiers push the car of an Iraqi man to start the engine at a check point in north Baghdad June 13, 2007. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

“This was a really boring day and nothing was happening. The Americans even took a picture of me while I slept under a tree. They were laughing at me and I woke up and saw them start pushing this car of an Iraqi man. His engine wouldn’t start so the Americans helped him.”
IRAQ
RTR1R9N2
June 28, 2007
An Iraqi soldier sleeps next to his Kalashnikov rifle on the roof of a base in Baquba June 29, 2007....
Baquba, Iraq
An Iraqi soldier sleeps next to his Kalashnikov rifle on the roof of a base in Baquba
An Iraqi soldier sleeps next to his Kalashnikov rifle on the roof of a base in Baquba June 29, 2007. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

“I was on a rooftop sending pictures when I saw this soldier sleeping so I took a few frames. I remember Baquba well as I would lose 12 kilos over 3 weeks, because it was so hot. I was like a donkey - carrying 2-3 cameras, body armor, at least 3 liters of water in a camel pack and extra water bottles in my pockets. I used to carry heavy body armor as there were so many IEDs. At the end of the day you would drop everything and put on some dry clothes as yours were full of sweat.”
IRAQ
RTR1FV3D
July 26, 2006
A wounded Iraqi woman is helped after several bomb attacks in central Baghdad July 27, 2006. The death...
Baghdad, Iraq
A wounded Iraqi woman is helped after several bomb attacks in central Baghdad
A wounded Iraqi woman is helped after several bomb attacks in central Baghdad July 27, 2006. The death toll from a car bombing and mortar attacks in central Baghdad on Thursday has risen to at least 25, Ministry of Interior sources said. They said 45 people were wounded in the attacks. REUTERS/Mohammed Ameen
“These were days of violence in Iraq and in Baghdad, in particular after 2003.

I headed to the scene of the blast where a building packed with explosive materials was leveled to the ground; the last thing I expected to see was a walking victim. She was covered with blood, moaning and screaming to people to help her to save the children who were stuck under the collapsed building.
I was confused and hesitant whether to take photos or help her. In the end I had no choice but to help her after taking some pictures of the site. Unfortunately, we failed to save the children due to the smoke and fire that set the building ablaze. I will not forget that tragic day forever. Dozens were killed and hundreds wounded in one of Baghdad's bloody days.”
IRAQ
RTRIOR9
July 24, 2005
U.S. soldiers from the Stryker brigade are reflected in a mirror as they detain suspected insurgents...
Mosul
US soldiers are reflected in a mirror as they detain suspects during a night raid in Mosul.
U.S. soldiers from the Stryker brigade are reflected in a mirror as they detain suspected insurgents during a night raid in Mosul in northern Iraq July 25, 2005. Sunni Arabs said on Monday they would rejoin talks to hammer out a new constitution for Iraq, in the hope of rescuing a political process that has been severely strained by unrelenting bloodshed. REUTERS/Andrea Comas

“The picture was taken during a night raid in Mosul. Apparently the Americans had received a phone call accusing somebody in the house of belonging to the insurgent’s movement. When we went into the house what seemed to be a family was sitting on the floor having dinner. There were several children looking very scared at the soldiers storming the house. The soldiers searched through all the rooms and finally arrested the three adult men that were there. I think the two younger ones were brothers and an elderly man was their father, the grandfather of the children. I remember that I was very surprised that the children were able to stay almost silent and sitting on the floor all the time we were there. The three suspects were taken blindfolded into the garden of the house, where they had to kneel down. One by one they were taken separately to the backyard of the house. There they were interrogated by Americans that were not wearing soldier uniforms. They also had longer hair then the soldiers and beards. I had seen one of them before at the military camp. I was not allowed to attend the questioning. After a while all three men were taken into one of the military vehicles which had been brought to the house. None of them said anything or protested in any way. I have a vague memory of us stopping at a place where they were taken out of the vehicle. Then I think we drove back to the main military camp. But I'm not 100% sure about this.”
IRAQ/
RTX7BKG
June 24, 2008
A U.S. soldier of the 1/8 Infantry Battalion keeps watch from the roof of a building during a battlefield...
Mosul, Iraq
A U.S. soldier keeps watch from the roof of a building during a battlefield circulation patrol in Mosul...
A U.S. soldier of the 1/8 Infantry Battalion keeps watch from the roof of a building during a battlefield circulation patrol in Mosul June 25, 2008. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

“During my second trip to Iraq, I was assigned to cover Mosul, in the north of the country. I was told that the most important aspect during my assignment was to follow the U.S. troops searching for IEDs. These searches were made house by house. It was a really difficult month, not only being scared at the possibility of taking my last breath of life, but also because I spent almost half of my assignment waiting for the sandstorms to pass.
In June 2008, I was assigned to 1/8 Infantry Battalion in Mosul. We were patrolling the streets on foot for hours when we heard some shots ahead of us. The Commander gave us the order to take cover inside a construction area. As soon as we reached the place some soldiers ran up the stairs to take up positions as another soldier watched from the roof. As soon as I saw the other soldier on the roof, I made my way upstairs. But when I reached the spot, I only took two frames because we were in the middle of a battlefield and the scene was broken. This was the only picture that worked, an American soldier watching from the roof of a construction site at those shooting back at them with some smoke billowing on the skyline.
IRAQ USA MEMORIAL
RTR6EDF
November 06, 2003
A row of U.S. Army helmets are perched on M-16 rifles during a memorial at Al Asad air base November...
Al Asad
ROW OF HELMETS SIT ON M-16 RIFLES DURING MEMORIAL IN IRAQ FOR U.S. ARMY HELICOPTER CRASH VICTIMS.
A row of U.S. Army helmets are perched on M-16 rifles during a memorial at Al Asad air base November 6, 2003 for the 15 victims of a Chinook helicopter which was shot down by insurgents on the weekend. Against a backdrop of 15 helmets resting on M-16 rifles, American soldiers on Thursday honoured their comrades, victims of the single deadliest incident for U.S. forces sinces they invaded Iraq. Pictures of the Month November 2003 REUTERS/Chris Helgren

“Within about six months after the fall of Saddam Hussein’s regime, Iraq’s occupation was getting ugly. Roadside bombs had begun to take their toll, and in early November, 2003 our bureau in Baghdad was alerted to news that a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter had crashed. Very shortly afterward it was apparent the chopper had been shot down, killing 15 soldiers and crew and wounding 26. A few days later one more of them died at a hospital in Germany.
This was the largest single U.S. loss of life to date in the Iraq war, and it really shook America. Most of the victims were from bases in the Midwest and Texas, as well as soldiers from Fort Carson, Colorado. Three days after the crash I arrived at Al Asad air base to witness a memorial to the fallen. It was quite a sobering event, as troops quite visibly shaken formed up in front of a flatbed truck on which helmets were perched atop 15 rifles and pairs of desert boots. The light was just starting to go and I made a few pictures of this scene with an azure sky before it faded to black. Later, eulogies were made and a 21-gun salute was fired, and many of the mourners became overcome, supported by comrades as they knelt or wept openly. I felt for them, just due to the connection of Fort Carson, a town lying just off the same Rocky Mountains chain that stretches into my home province of British Columbia, Canada. Besides the usual duty of being an objective journalist, I really wanted to show respect and I think the photo manages that.”
USA-BUSH/
RTX4BY2
December 03, 2007
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Tears run from the eyes of U.S. President George W. Bush during a ceremony...
Washington, UNITED STATES
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 -
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Tears run from the eyes of U.S. President George W. Bush during a ceremony in honor of Medal of Honor winner Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham in the East room of the White House in Washington, January 11, 2007. Cpl. Dunham was killed when he jumped on a grenade to save fellow members of his Marine patrol while serving in Iraq. REUTERS/Jim Bourg

“During a 2007 White House ceremony awarding U.S. Marine Corps Corporal Jason Dunham the Medal Of Honor after his death in Iraq, tears emerged from the eyes and streamed down the cheeks of President George W. Bush. Standing beside the Marine’s mother Debra, the president was listening to a description of how Dunham selflessly threw himself atop a grenade about to explode to save the lives of those around him. Luckily, in an effort to make a picture different than the dozens of other photographers in the room, I had taken the furthest possible position off to the side, and the glint of the lights off the tears made them far more visible than from the front, where they were hard or impossible to see.”
IRAQ/
RTR1MDSQ
February 14, 2007
An Iraqi policeman watches a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter leaving an Iraqi Police base southeast of Baghdad,...
Baghdad, Iraq
An Iraqi policeman watches a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter leaving an Iraqi Police base southeast of Baghdad...
An Iraqi policeman watches a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter leaving an Iraqi Police base southeast of Baghdad, February 14, 2007. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

“This Iraqi policeman was watching a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter leaving his base in the southeast of Baghdad. The day was very hot and a lot of the policemen in the guardtowers were taking a nap. You didn't hear much more than the wind running over the desert, until this spaceship of a machine appeared, disturbing dreams.”
IRAQ/
RTR1YD4Z
March 16, 2008
U.S. soldiers stand near the Swords of Qadisiyah monument in Baghdad March 13, 2008. Picture taken March...
Baghdad, Iraq
U.S. soldiers stand near Swords of Qadisiyah monument in Baghdad
U.S. soldiers stand near the Swords of Qadisiyah monument in Baghdad March 13, 2008. Picture taken March 13, 2008. REUTERS/Ceerwan Aziz

“While I was on my way to cover an event and at a gathering point where journalists and photographers used to wait in Baghdad, two American soldiers standing near the monument of cross-swords attracted my attention. I took this picture to make the comparison between the symbols of the monument and the presence of the U.S. soldiers who occupied the country, it was a moment to document the contrast that we lived.”
IRAQ
RTROOZV
September 18, 2005
British soldier jumps from a burning tank which was set ablaze after a shooting incident in the southern...
Basra
British soldier jumps from burning tank in southern Iraq city of Basra.
British soldier jumps from a burning tank which was set ablaze after a shooting incident in the southern Iraqi city of Basra September 19, 2005. Angry crowds attacked a British tank with petrol bombs and rocks in Basra on Monday after Iraqi authorities said they had detained two British undercover soldiers in the southern city for firing on police. Two Iraqis were killed in the violence, an Interior Ministry official said. Pictures of the Year 2005 REUTERS/Atef Hassan

“It was a tough situation following confrontations and shootings between the British army and the Mehdi Army. It was very dangerous because people were angry. I was worried and scared.”
IRAQ
RTR5YCS
October 30, 2003
A detained Iraqi man with a plastic bag covering his head sits in garden of a house searched by U.S....
A detained Iraqi man with a plastic bag covering his head sits in garden of a house searched by U.S....
A detained Iraqi man with a plastic bag covering his head sits in garden of a house searched by U.S. soldiers during a night raid in Tikrit October 30, 2003.
REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“I was embedded in Tikrit, Saddam Hussein’s hometown with the U.S. army unit that would capture the Iraqi dictator not long after I shot this picture. Our mission was very simple – go with the U.S. troops to as many raids as possible and see what happens. Rumors were saying Saddam was somewhere near.
Americans traveled and conducted their raids only at nights – apparently it was too dangerous to move outside Saddam’s deluxe palace into the city during the day. The raids themselves were very quick – soldiers would break into the targeted house without asking too many questions. Women and children would be forced into the corner, men handcuffed and plastic bags put over their heads.
This man was sleeping outside a house when the Americans stormed in. Since soldiers put the plastic bag over his head, he did not move nor make a sound until they left. I think I could have taken this picture with a minute long exposure – it would be still sharp. The man just did not move. That was the time when a small mistake or a wrong move could have been fatal and everyone knew that.
IRAQ/
RTX4ZO3
December 24, 2007
An Iraqi man unbuttons his shirt as U.S. soldiers point their laser sights on him during an operation...
Baiji, Iraq
Iraqi man unbuttons shirt as U.S. soldiers point laser sights on him during operation near Baiji oil...
An Iraqi man unbuttons his shirt as U.S. soldiers point their laser sights on him during an operation near Baiji oil refinery December 24, 2007. REUTERS/Bob Strong (IRAQ)
“I was on an embed with the U.S. Army in Baiji, north of Baghdad. One of the things they were responsible for was Iraq's largest oil refinery north of the city. We were on an early morning patrol through the worker's housing area and this man began to approach the troops carrying a rucksack. The soldiers shouted for him to stop and put their laser rifle sights on his face and chest. He stopped, dropped his pack and opened his shirt to show he did not have an explosive vest or weapons underneath. The soldiers put down their weapons and he was allowed to continue.”
IRAQ
RTRKXRZ
March 25, 2003
A body of Iraqi man lies by the road side north of Al Nassiriyah on March 25, 2003. More than 30 men...
Al Nassiriyah, Iraq
THE BODY OF AN IRAQI MAN LIES BY THE ROAD OUTSIDE NASSIRIYAH.
A body of Iraqi man lies by the road side north of Al Nassiriyah on March 25, 2003. More than 30 men of military age were killed on the key northern highway by an apparent U.S. air strike on the vehicles carrying the Iraqis. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“With short stops to fight brief battles, fix equipment or merge with other units the road to Baghdad for Marines I was embedded with during the Iraqi invasion was pretty much driving, driving and more driving. The road cut straight through the desert and it was obvious that the troops were avoiding towns and villages – the main target was way up north and troops were rushing toward Baghdad from all the sides. However, dead bodies were all around. There would be the wreckage of a bus with bodies in colorful clothes all around, like a broken child’s toy dropped in the dirt or just a single body left helpless and lifeless under the desert sun. There was a mighty force from the air that “cleaned” the road for the troops on the ground. Whoever was unlucky or crazy enough to use the same road was a potential target.
I shot this picture from atop armored Marines vehicle speeding toward the Iraqi capital - a simple picture of an unknown man “of military age” killed and left in the ugly landscape among tank trails, surrounded by nothing but dust and the noise of war.”
IRAQ
RTRLTPL
January 30, 2005
An Iraqi police officer checks a donkey, pulling a disabled man on a cart, before allowing it to enter...
Basra
Iraqi police officer checks donkey in polling station in Basra.
An Iraqi police officer checks a donkey, pulling a disabled man on a cart, before allowing it to enter a polling station in the country's second largest city of Basra, January 30, 2005. Insurgents unleashed a wave of bloody attacks on Iraq's historic election on Sunday, killing at least 22 people and wounding dozens in suicide bombings and mortar strikes at polling stations across the country. Pictures of the month January 2005 Pictures of the Year 2005 REUTERS/Atef Hassan

“This picture shows a donkey-drawn cart ridden by a handicapped man being inspected as it entered a polling station. These were the first elections after the fall of Saddam Hussein.”
BSR100D
RTRL1FN
March 28, 2003
A family flees past a destroyed Iraqi T-55 tank after a mortar attack on British Army positions in the...
Basra, multiple countries
BASRA RESIDENTS FLEE SITE OF SHELLING NEAR BRITISH POSITIONS IN SOUTHERN IRAQ.
A family flees past a destroyed Iraqi T-55 tank after a mortar attack on British Army positions in the southern city of Basra March 28, 2003. Iraqi forces fired on about 2,000 civilians trying to flee fighting and a humanitarian crisis in the beseiged southern city of Basra, forcing some to turn back, British military officials said on Friday. REUTERS/Chris Helgren

“A few days after crossing the Iraqi frontier from Kuwait, where we’d watched the night time assault from atop a water tower, British Army lines were edging closer and closer to the major southern city of Basra. Roads were jammed with local people heading towards us, but curiously enough a large number were also returning back home with supplies. This porous front line was rather curious, and our Reuters multi-media crew, riding in an armored Land Rover nicknamed “Brenda the Defender”, continually tried to keep an eye on what was going on. Finally, on May 28 cameraman Fedja Grulovic and I were able to make it across the Zubair bridge spanning the Shatt al-Basrah waterway and into Basra’s city limits. We were the first Western journalists to do so. The British Army were prodding the lines on the edge of the city up ahead, sending Warrior fighting vehicles up and down a road flanking the city’s technical institute. When the British got close, a barrage of mortars was unleashed by the Iraqi forces, prompting the withdrawal of the Warriors. Unfortunately, we and a number of civilians were also on the road. I saw a group of them running towards me and shot a few frames of this family passing a destroyed tank. Within seconds Fedja and I had to dive under the same tank, making room for an Iraqi cyclist too, as mortar shells exploded around us.

Luckily nobody was injured, but British propaganda officers soon appeared to announce that the Iraqis were shelling their own people, neglecting to mention that the barrage was prompted by the presence of British Army reconnaissance vehicles.”
USA/
RTXMUGG
May 23, 2009
Laura Youngblood, widow of U.S. Navy Petty Officer Travis L. Youngblood, touches his grave stone while...
Arlington, UNITED STATES
Widow of U.S. Navy Petty Officer killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom visits his grave during Memorial Day...
Laura Youngblood, widow of U.S. Navy Petty Officer Travis L. Youngblood, touches his grave stone while visiting his grave in Section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery during the Memorial Day weekend in Arlington, Virginia, May 24, 2009. Youngblood died of wounds received in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in July of 2005 in Iraq. REUTERS/Larry Downing

“My wife, Angelica, and I decided to walk around Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day in 2009 as tourists and I made sure my small, amateur looking pocket camera, a Panasonic Lumix, made the trip from home with us tucked inside my pocket. I'm a U.S. military veteran and wanted to pay my holiday respects to the fallen honored inside Section 60 (where military personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan are being buried). As we walked around, it was surprising how young all the men and women killed in combat were, judged by the obvious youth of the grieving parents, widows and children visiting their loved ones' graves. As I walked around reading the names and birthdates on the gravestones I noticed a woman lying on her back gently touching the ‘face’ of her husband's stone while ignoring everyone else around her. I raised my tiny camera and shot one, quiet, frame, of this tender moment and stepped away. She slowly got up and calmly gathered her purse before saying, ‘I'll see you later, honey’ to her husband. She then turned to me and introduced me to her husband, and two others buried next to him. The picture of her was the spark for me to devote the next four months of weekends along with my wife to walk around Section 60.”
IRAQ/
RTR6KJI
November 09, 2003
A barefoot Iraqi man is detained by soldiers of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Forse Ironhorse)...
Baquba
BAREFOOT IRAQI MAN IS DETAINED BY U.S. TROOPS DURING A RAID IN TIKRIT.
A barefoot Iraqi man is detained by soldiers of U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division (Task Forse Ironhorse) during a raid in the suburb of Baquba November 9, 2003. U.S. troops raided several houses in Baquba late afternoon looking for members of suspected terrorist cell planning attacks on coalition forces. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

To remember what happened in and around this picture, I had to go into my archive. It is an image that could have been taken on any day since U.S. troops and their allies invaded the country. The caption also does not offer a lot more – just basic information about the time and place and what army unit was involved.
And that’s it. Contrary to this man who was detained and later brought to the base – what happened to him after I don’t know – for us it was just another ugly day that it could have turned even more uglier if something went wrong. What I do remember is one petty officer during this operation in Baquba – I remember his cheap fake teeth, old fashioned mustaches and how brutal he was with Iraqis that were captured that day. His family name suggested he had roots in the former Yugoslavia, the place where I come from.”
BUSH/
RTR1ODOB
April 05, 2007
A photograph and dogtags of 20-year-old U.S. Marine Alexander Arredondo, killed in Najaf, Iraq on August...
Crawford, UNITED STATES
A picture of a Marine killed in Iraq is shown at a symbolic "cemetery" at Camp Casey in Crawford, Texas...
A photograph and dogtags of 20-year-old U.S. Marine Alexander Arredondo, killed in Najaf, Iraq on August 25, 2004, lie attached to a cross at a symbolic cemetery at "Camp Casey" near the ranch of U.S. President George W. Bush in Crawford, Texas, April 6, 2007. Dozens of crosses representing U.S. troops that have died in Iraq and Afghanistan have been set up by relatives of those killed, part of a protest against the war which began in August 2005 by peace activist Cindy Sheehan, who lost her son Casey in Iraq. REUTERS/Jason Reed

“This picture was taken at a symbolic cemetery for the hundreds of Americans killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, in a Texas field just down the road from the ranch of President George W. Bush where he was on summer vacation. The cemetery was started by peace activist Cindy Sheehan, who lost her son Casey, whom the cemetery is named after - Camp Casey. The site was a lightning rod for many peace activists and the parents of those who died serving their country. In the time that Bush was on his ranch, I would go down to Camp Casey periodically and take a look at the personal tributes, putting a human face on all the lost souls. This particular sight drew me in with the dog tags and photograph of the Alexander Arredondo, just 20 years old, who was killed in Najaf on August 25, 2004.”
IRAQ
RTXLZR6
May 20, 2003
Elderly Iraqi women hold on to each other as they wait in line for a $40 emergency salary payment from...
Baghdad, Iraq
Elderly Iraqi women hold on to each other as they wait in line for a $40 emergency salary payment fr.....
Elderly Iraqi women hold on to each other as they wait in line for a $40 emergency salary payment from ORHA (Organisation for Relief and Humanitarian Aid) outside the pension office in Baghdad May 21 2003. REUTERS/Kieran Doherty

I was working unilaterally in Baghdad in a period immediately following the U.S. liberation of the city. As a western journalist I was able to go anywhere and shoot anything because there was still a general sense of euphoria amongst Iraqis over the flight of Saddam Hussein and the pulling down of his statue in Paradise Square about a month earlier. On this particular occasion I was on my way back from shooting another story when we got caught up in traffic as we neared our base at the Palestine hotel. I noticed a compound where women were lining up in the midday heat for some form of monetary handout.

I could see the picture I wanted to take before I even got out of the car. The wizened hands of the three old women holding each other against the black silk of their garments immediately reminded me of Albrecht Durer's 'Betende Hande' (Praying Hands). I had wasted hours and hours as a youngster trying to copy this pen and ink drawing with very limited success. Hands and feet feature quite regularly in my photographs, and ironically they were the two elements of the human form I always struggled to paint. When I shot the picture, I didn't think it actually had any meaning at all, my reasons for doing so were purely aesthetic.”
IRAQ
RTRS0M7
April 30, 2003
The White House said on October 29, 2003 that it had helped with the production of a "Mission Accomplished"...
Aboard The Uss Abraham Lincoln, United States of America
FILE PHOTO OF US PRESIDENT BUSH DELIVERS SPEECH ABOARD THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
The White House said on October 29, 2003 that it had helped with the production of a "Mission Accomplished" banner as a backdrop for President George W. Bush's speech onboard the USS Abraham Lincoln to declare combat operations over in Iraq. This file photo shows Bush delivering a speech to crew aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln, as the carrier steamed toward San Diego, California on May 1, 2003. REUTERS/Larry Downing

“President George W. Bush flew in the back seat inside a U.S. Navy attack aircraft from San Diego to the aircraft carrier, USS Abraham Lincoln, to give a rah-rah speech to the ship's personnel on the flight deck of the warship shortly after the U.S. went to war in Iraq. The White House staff made a point of saving a shooting position head-on for the tight press pool traveling with Bush from Washington. It always seemed curious to me that the White House would declare "Mission Accomplished" to a war which lasted for many more years killing hundreds of American GI's and thousands of Iraqi citizens.”
IRAQ-USA/PROTEST
RTX4BXZ
December 03, 2007
Alicia Casilio, dressed as an Iraqi civilian, stands silently at an anti-Iraq war protest in Boston,...
Boston, UNITED STATES
Alicia Casilio, dressed as an Iraqi civilian, stands silently at an anti-Iraq war protest in Boston,...
Alicia Casilio, dressed as an Iraqi civilian, stands silently at an anti-Iraq war protest in Boston, Massachusetts January 11, 2007. The numbers on Casilio's face represent the number of Iraqi civilians killed in the war. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

“I took this photograph during a protest against the Iraq conflict. The woman in the photograph is one of three women, triplets, who staged a sort of performance art piece at the event. As she explained it, the numbers on her face referred to the number of Iraqi civilians killed up to that point (a range of estimates on either cheek). For me what makes the photograph more intriguing is the question mark in the middle.”
SOUVENIRS OF WAR/
RTXUE5S
November 08, 2010
San Antonio Rampage hockey player U.S. Army's Shane Parsons refreshes with a shower of cologne after...
Laurel, UNITED STATES
San Antonio Rampage hockey player U.S. Army's Shane Parsons during National Disabled Festival in Laurel,...
San Antonio Rampage hockey player U.S. Army's Shane Parsons refreshes with a shower of cologne after playing sled hockey game during National Disabled Festival in Laurel, Maryland, April 10, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

“Shane Parsons became one of the key components of the multimedia piece Jason Reed and I spent months working on entitled, ‘Souvenirs of War: Purple Hearts, Prosthetics and Phantom Pains.’ Shane is a young American soldier who showed true bravery every single day after waking up and never quitting after nearly losing his life along with both his legs fighting for the U.S. in the Iraq war. He epitomized the warrior spirit of can-do and puts a face to the common type of injury wounded veterans are living with... the loss of limbs.
I photographed him inside the locker room alone after he played in a sled hockey game in Maryland. He can't shower like his team mates using the standard, walk-in locker room showers so he carries a bottle of cologne to use after exercise to refresh himself.”
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