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RTXBR20
Allen Stanford Gets 110 Years in Jail for Ponzi Scheme - 14 Jun 2012
Allen Stanford Gets 110 Years in Jail for Ponzi Scheme - 14 Jun 2012
STANFORD-PONZI/
RTR33L5W
June 14, 2012
Convicted financier Allen Stanford, who faces up to 230 years in prison for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Convicted financier Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston for sentencing.
Convicted financier Allen Stanford, who faces up to 230 years in prison for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives at Federal Court in Houston for sentencing June 14, 2012. In a demand more likely to remain symbolic than be fulfilled, the U.S. government wants Allen Stanford to forfeit $5.9 billion from his massive Ponzi scheme, even though the convicted financier has been declared indigent. The demand requires court approval, and was made two days before Stanford, who was once considered a billionaire, is to be sentenced for operating a multi-billion dollar fraud. Stanford, 62, could spend the rest of his life behind bars. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-PONZI
RTR33LB0
June 14, 2012
Convicted financier Allen Stanford, who faces up to 230 years in prison for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Convicted financier Allen Stanford, who faces up to 230 years in prison for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme,...
Convicted financier Allen Stanford, who faces up to 230 years in prison for his $7 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives at Federal Court in Houston for sentencing June 14, 2012. In a demand more likely to remain symbolic than be fulfilled, the U.S. government wants Allen Stanford to forfeit $5.9 billion from his massive Ponzi scheme, even though the convicted financier has been declared indigent. The demand requires court approval, and was made two days before Stanford, who was once considered a billionaire, is to be sentenced for operating a multi-billion dollar fraud. Stanford, 62, could spend the rest of his life behind bars. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YY43
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston
Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy. He was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. REUTERS/Donna W. Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YY3S
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston
Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy. He was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YY40
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012....
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy. He was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. REUTERS/Donna W. Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YY4X
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012....
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy. He was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YY4M
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012....
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston
Allen Stanford leaves the Federal Courthouse where the jury found him guilty, in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy. He was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YXJI
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal...
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud charges by a federal jury on Tuesday for leading a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank in Antigua. A jury of eight men and four women found Stanford, whose net worth was once estimated at more than $2 billion, guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YXJD
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his...
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud charges by a federal jury on Tuesday for leading a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank in Antigua. A jury of eight men and four women found Stanford, whose net worth was once estimated at more than $2 billion, guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YXJJ
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal...
Allen Stanford waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud charges by a federal jury on Tuesday for leading a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank in Antigua. A jury of eight men and four women found Stanford, whose net worth was once estimated at more than $2 billion, guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YXJF
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict...
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud charges by a federal jury on Tuesday for leading a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank in Antigua. A jury of eight men and four women found Stanford, whose net worth was once estimated at more than $2 billion, guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2YX9M
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his...
Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford, 61, on trial in federal court in Houston, is accused of running a $7.1 billion Ponzi scheme. During the trial, prosecutors say that the former Texas financier used Stanford International Bank in Antigua as his own personal ATM, spending the deposits of his investors to finance a playboy lifestyle. Stanford's attorneys say he was not involved in day-to-day business decisions or any fraud. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/VERDICT
RTR2YXJQ
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford enters the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford enters the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial...
Allen Stanford enters the Federal Courthouse where the jury has reached a verdict in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud charges by a federal jury on Tuesday for leading a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from his offshore bank in Antigua. A jury of eight men and four women found Stanford, whose net worth was once estimated at more than $2 billion, guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2YX9I
March 06, 2012
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his criminal trial...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his criminal trial...
Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where the jury is deliberating in his criminal trial in Houston March 6, 2012. Stanford, 61, on trial in federal court in Houston, is accused of running a $7.1 billion Ponzi scheme. During the trial, prosecutors say that the former Texas financier used Stanford International Bank in Antigua as his own personal ATM, spending the deposits of his investors to finance a playboy lifestyle. Stanford's attorneys say he was not involved in day-to-day business decisions or any fraud. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2YMHO
February 29, 2012
Texas financier Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where final arguments and jury deliberations...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas financier Stanford arrives at the Federal Court in Houston
Texas financier Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal Courthouse where final arguments and jury deliberations are set to begin in his criminal trial in Houston February 29, 2012. Stanford, 61, is accused of bilking investors from more than 100 countries by selling fraudulent certificates of deposit from Stanford International Bank in Antigua, and then using those deposits to finance his own lifestyle. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTR2YMHZ
February 29, 2012
Texas financier Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where final arguments...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas financier Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse in Houston
Texas financier Allen Stanford smiles as he waits to enter the Federal Courthouse where final arguments and jury deliberations are set to begin in his criminal trial in Houston February 29, 2012. Stanford, 61, is accused of bilking investors from more than 100 countries by selling fraudulent certificates of deposit from Stanford International Bank in Antigua, and then using those deposits to finance his own lifestyle. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTR2YD88
February 24, 2012
Allen Stanford (C) arrives at the Federal Court in Houston February 24, 2012. Stanford is on trial battling...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Stanford arrives at the Federal Court in Houston
Allen Stanford (C) arrives at the Federal Court in Houston February 24, 2012. Stanford is on trial battling charges that he orchestrated a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. Prosecutors contend that Stanford stole money deposited at Stanford International Bank in Antigua and spent it on girlfriends, mansions, private jets and yachts. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2YD7N
February 24, 2012
Allen Stanford (C) arrives at the Federal Court in Houston February 24, 2012. Stanford is on trial battling...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Stanford arrives at the Federal Court in Houston
Allen Stanford (C) arrives at the Federal Court in Houston February 24, 2012. Stanford is on trial battling charges that he operated a $7 billion Ponzi scheme from Stanford International Bank, his offshore bank on the Caribbean island of Antigua. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2HHTU
August 24, 2010
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston...
Houston, UNITED STATES
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston...
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston August 24, 2010. Stanford, accused of masterminding a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, has lost a bid to get out of jail to work on a separate trial seeking to hold Lloyd's of London responsible for his defense costs. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD-PONZI
RTR2F5XV
June 14, 2010
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court in Houston...
Houston, UNITED STATES
File image of R. Allen Stanford leaving federal court in Houston
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court in Houston after a hearing in this file image from October 14, 2009.The judge handling the criminal case against accused Ponzi schemer Allen Stanford is allowing parties to review documents related to allegations that the Texas financier's lawyers engaged in insurance fraud. The order released June 14, 2010 by U.S. District Judge David Hittner in Houston adds a twist to an already unusual case in which Stanford has cycled through many lawyers, prompting three co-defendants to ask that their trials be severed because the case has become a "circus." REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS HEADSHOT)
STANFORD/
RTR2NAI0
June 04, 2011
Auctioneer Harry Worstell starts the bidding during a court-ordered auction of property seized from Stanford...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Auctioneer Harry Worstell starts the bidding during a court-ordered auction of property seized from Stanford...
Auctioneer Harry Worstell starts the bidding during a court-ordered auction of property seized from Stanford Financial's offices in Houston June 4, 2011. U.S. Prosecutors have accused Texas financier Allen Stanford of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme and defrauding investors who bought bogus certificates of deposit issued by his Antigua-based SIBL. Stanford, who has denied any wrongdoing, is scheduled to go on trial in September. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2NAHR
June 04, 2011
A prospective bidder takes a photo of disgraced financier Allen Stanford's purported $3 million antique...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford's purported $3m antique desk is among items in a court-ordered auction of property seized...
A prospective bidder takes a photo of disgraced financier Allen Stanford's purported $3 million antique desk, which he claimed was once owned by a King, which is among items in a court-ordered auction of property seized from Stanford's offices in Houston June 4, 2011. The 8 foot by 4 foot Victorian partner's library table is likely worth about $10,000, according to research conducted by the auction house. U.S. Prosecutors have accused Stanford of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme and defrauding investors who bought bogus certificates of deposit issued by his Antigua-based SIBL. Stanford, who has denied any wrongdoing, is scheduled to go on trial in September. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR2HHSR
August 24, 2010
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston...
Houston, UNITED STATES
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston...
R. Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston August 24, 2010. Stanford, accused of masterminding a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, has lost a bid to get out of jail to work on a separate trial seeking to hold Lloyd's of London responsible for his defense costs. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTR2HHTR
August 24, 2010
R. Allen Stanford exits a van upon arriving at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge...
Houston, UNITED STATES
R. Allen Stanford exits a van upon arriving at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge...
R. Allen Stanford exits a van upon arriving at federal court for a hearing before U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas in Houston August 24, 2010. Stanford, accused of masterminding a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, has lost a bid to get out of jail to work on a separate trial seeking to hold Lloyd's of London responsible for his defense costs. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTR2H9D7
August 11, 2010
Allen Stanford, accused of masterminding a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives at federal court in Houston,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
File photo of Allen Stanford arriving at federal court in Houston
Allen Stanford, accused of masterminding a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives at federal court in Houston, Texas, in this December 17, 2009 file photograph. Stanford lost his bid to get out of jail to work on a separate trial seeking to hold Lloyd's of London responsible for his defense costs. REUTERS/Donna Carson/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTXRY3H
December 17, 2009
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston December 17, 2009. A federal judge...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston December 17, 2009. A federal judge found Stanford and his attorneys in contempt of a court order on Wednesday over their attempts to collect insurance policy proceeds to pay defense costs. Stanford, 59, is accused of leading a Ponzi scheme centered on certificates of deposit issued by his Stanford International Bank Ltd, his offshore bank in Antigua. He has denied any wrongdoing. REUTERS/Donna Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTXRY3N
December 17, 2009
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston in the rain December 17, 2009. A...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston in the rain
Accused swindler Allen Stanford arrives at Federal Court in Houston in the rain December 17, 2009. A federal judge found Stanford and his attorneys in contempt of a court order on Wednesday over their attempts to collect insurance policy proceeds to pay defense costs. Stanford, 59, is accused of leading a Ponzi scheme centered on certificates of deposit issued by his Stanford International Bank Ltd, his offshore bank in Antigua. He has denied any wrongdoing. REUTERS/Donna Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS) QUALITY FROM SOURCE
STANFORD/
RTXPNBC
October 14, 2009
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, boards a prison van as he leaves...
Houston, UNITED STATES
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court in Houston...
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, boards a prison van as he leaves federal court in Houston after a hearing October 14, 2009. Stanford fell ill during a hearing on Wednesday where a judge denied the U.S. government's request to set a trial date. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTXPMK9
October 14, 2009
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in...
Houston, United Kingdom
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in...
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in Houston wearing handcuffs and leg irons October 14, 2009. Stanford's status hearing begins on Wednesday. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTXPMKL
October 14, 2009
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in...
Houston, UNITED STATES
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in...
R. Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, arrives at federal court in Houston wearing handcuffs and leg irons October 14, 2009. Stanford's status hearing begins on Wednesday. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
STANFORD/
RTR27W33
September 15, 2009
Allen Stanford the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court after it was...
Houston, multiple countries
Allen Stanford the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court
Allen Stanford the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court after it was determined he has no money to pay an attorney, and a federal judge ordered the Public Defender's Office to take his case in Houston September 15, 2009. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STANFORD/CANADA
RTR27V99
September 15, 2009
Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing sporting hand cuffs, leg irons and an orange jumpsuit...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Allen Stanford arrives at federal court in Houston
Allen Stanford arrives at federal court for a hearing sporting hand cuffs, leg irons and an orange jumpsuit in Houston September 15, 2009. Stanford faces civil and criminal fraud charges related to a suspected Ponzi scheme which prosecutors claim funded his luxurious lifestyle. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT)
STANFORD/LAWYER
RTR27W1Y
September 15, 2009
Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court after it was...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court in Houston
Allen Stanford, the former billionaire accused of a $7 billion fraud, leaves federal court after it was determined he has no money to pay for an attorney, and a federal judge ordered the Public Defender's Office to take his case in Houston September 15, 2009. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES BUSINESS CRIME LAW IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STANFORD/
RTR256FR
June 29, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford gives members of the media a thumbs up as he leaves the Bob Casey Federal...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Stanford leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford gives members of the media a thumbs up as he leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in the custody of U.S. Marshals in Houston June 29, 2009. Stanford will spend Monday night in jail after U.S. prosecutors told a federal judge that the accused swindler would likely flee the country rather than face life in prison if released on bail. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR256FU
June 29, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in the custody of U.S. Marshals...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Stanford leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford (C) leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in the custody of U.S. Marshals in Houston June 29, 2009. Stanford will spend Monday night in jail after U.S. prosecutors told a federal judge that the accused swindler would likely flee the country rather than face life in prison if released on bail. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR256FX
June 29, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford boards the transport van as he leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Stanford leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford boards the transport van as he leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in Houston, Texas June 29, 2009. Stanford will spend Monday night in jail after U.S. prosecutors told a federal judge that the accused swindler would likely flee the country rather than face life in prison if released on bail. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-FINANCIAL/
RTR2527Q
June 27, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford gives a "thumbs up" to the media as he arrives at the Federal courthouse...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford gives a "thumbs up" to the media as he arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of U.S. marshals June 26, 2009. Stanford's bond was set at $500,000 and he pled not guilty yesterday to 21 criminal charges that he ran a seven billion dollar Ponzi scheme. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CONFLICT SOCIETY CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR252YL
June 26, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston,...
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston, Texas June 26, 2009, in the custody of a US Marshal. Stanford will remain in a Texas jail at least until Monday as a federal judge reconsiders his $500,000 bond at the urging of prosecutors who say the accused swindler is a flight risk, according to a ruling on Friday. REUTERS/Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR255WX
June 29, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford's shackled feet are pictured as he arrives at the Bob Casey Federal...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Stanford's shackled feet are pictured as he arrives at the Bob Casey Federal courthouse...
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford's shackled feet are pictured as he arrives at the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in the custody of U.S. Marshals in Houston June 29, 2009. Stanford faces criminal charges for a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CONFLICT SOCIETY CRIME LAW BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STANFORD/
RTR251KR
June 26, 2009
Gilbert Lopez (C), the chief accounting officer at Stanford Group walks with his lawyers, Jim Levine...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Gilbert Lopez the chief accounting officer at Stanford Group leaves the Bob Casey Federal courthouse...
Gilbert Lopez (C), the chief accounting officer at Stanford Group walks with his lawyers, Jim Levine (L) and Jack Zimmermann (R) as they leave the Bob Casey Federal courthouse in Houston, Texas, June 25, 2009. Texas financier Allen Stanford will spend another night in a Texas jail after he pleaded not guilty Thursday to 21 criminal charges that he ran a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. U.S. Magistrate Judge Frances Stacy set Stanford's bond at $500,000 with a $100,000 cash deposit. But Judge Stacy stayed her order until 4:30 p.m. CDT Friday (2130 GMT) after the U.S. Justice Department said it plans to appeal, arguing that Stanford was likely to flee the country rather than face life in prison if convicted of the charges. REUTERS/Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-FINANCIAL/
RTR2527R
June 27, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford yells to the media as he arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford yells to media at the Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford yells to the media as he arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of U.S. marshals June 26, 2009. Stanford's bond was set at $500,000 and he pled not guilty yesterday to 21 criminal charges that he ran a seven billion dollar Ponzi scheme. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CONFLICT SOCIETY CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR251L6
June 26, 2009
James Stanford (with walker), father of Texas billionaire Allen Stanford, leaves the Federal courthouse...
Houston, UNITED STATES
James Stanford father of Texas billionaire Allen Stanford leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston Texas...
James Stanford (with walker), father of Texas billionaire Allen Stanford, leaves the Federal courthouse after attending his son's hearing in Houston, Texas, June 25, 2009. At right is James Stanford's wife Billie. Texas financier Allen Stanford will spend another night in a Texas jail after he pleaded not guilty Thursday to 21 criminal charges that he ran a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. U.S. Magistrate Judge Frances Stacy set Stanford's bond at $500,000 with a $100,000 cash deposit. But Judge Stacy stayed her order until 4:30 p.m. CDT Friday (2130 GMT) after the U.S. Justice Department said it plans to appeal, arguing that Stanford was likely to flee the country rather than face life in prison if convicted of the charges. REUTERS/Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR252YN
June 26, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston,...
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford flashes a "thumb up" as he leaves the Federal courthouse in Houston, Texas June 26, 2009. Stanford will remain in a Texas jail at least until Monday as a federal judge reconsiders his $500,000 bond at the urging of prosecutors who say the accused swindler is a flight risk, according to a ruling on Friday. REUTERS/Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-FINANCIAL/
RTR250PT
June 25, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of US marshalls,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston.
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of US marshalls, June 25, 2009. The Security and Exchange Commission estimates that 30,000 investors were affected by what federal officials describe as a seven billion dollar pyramid scam executed by Stanford, three associates and a top Caribbean regulator. The 59-year-old Stanford has denied all wrongdoing. REUTERS/Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-FINANCIAL/
RTR250Q6
June 25, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of U.S....
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston.
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of U.S. marshalls, June 25, 2009. The Security and Exchange Commission estimates that 30,000 investors were affected by what federal officials describe as a seven billion dollar pyramid scam executed by Stanford, three associates and a top Caribbean regulator. The 59-year-old Stanford has denied all wrongdoing. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-FINANCIAL/
RTR250NM
June 25, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of US marshalls,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston, in the custody of US marshalls, June 25, 2009. The Security and Exchange Commission estimates that 30,000 investors were affected by what federal officials describe as a seven billion dollar pyramid scam executed by Stanford, three associates and a top Caribbean regulator. The 59-year-old Stanford has denied all wrongdoing. REUTERS/ Steve Campbell (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD FINANCIAL/
RTR250PD
June 25, 2009
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston in the custody of Federal...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston in the custody of Federal...
Texas billionaire Allen Stanford arrives at the Federal courthouse in Houston in the custody of Federal marshalls, June 25, 2009. The Security and Exchange Commission estimates that 30,000 investors were affected by what federal officials describe as a seven billion dollar pyramid scam executed by Stanford, three associates and a top Caribbean regulator. The 59-year-old Stanford has denied all wrongdoing. REUTERS/Donna Carson (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR24U2I
June 19, 2009
Tim Johnson (C), US Attorney of the Southern Disctrict of Texas, speaks as Lanny A. Breuer (L), Assistant...
Washington, United Kingdom
Tim Johnson, US Attorney of the Southern Disctrict of Texas, announces indictments against Robert Allen...
Tim Johnson (C), US Attorney of the Southern Disctrict of Texas, speaks as Lanny A. Breuer (L), Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division at the US Department of Justice and Robert Khuzami Director of Enforcement at the Securities Exchange Commission listen to an announcement of indictments against Robert Allen Stanford, Chairman of the Stanford Financial Group on fraud and obstruction charges related to a $7 billion scheme to defraud investors in Washington, June 19, 2009. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD/
RTR24TXV
June 19, 2009
A general view shows the federal court in Richmond, Virginia June 19, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen Stanford...
Richmond, UNITED STATES
A general view shows the federal court in Richmond, Virginia
A general view shows the federal court in Richmond, Virginia June 19, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen Stanford and four associates were indicted on fraud, conspiracy and obstruction charges in a $7 billion pyramid scheme to bilk investors, U.S. Justice Department officials announced on Friday. Stanford, a flamboyant 59-year-old financier, will appear in the court to answer charges by a Texas grand jury that he orchestrated the fraud through his Antigua bank with the aid of company executives and an Antigua regulator. REUTERS/Mike Theiler (UNITED STATES CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
STANFORD-MEXICO/
RTXBU0V
February 19, 2009
Juan Alcocer, a client of Stanford Fondos speaks to Reuters outside a Stanford office in Mexico City,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Juan Alcocer, a client of Stanford Bank speaks to Reuters outside a Stanford office in Mexico City
Juan Alcocer, a client of Stanford Fondos speaks to Reuters outside a Stanford office in Mexico City, February 19, 2009. Mexico's banking regulator is investigating a local Stanford bank unit for possible violation of banking laws, an official at the financial industry watchdog said on Thursday. The CNBV regulator is looking into whether Mexican unit Stanford Fondos broke laws on investing abroad, Carlos Lopez-Moctezuma, a senior official told Reuters. REUTERS/Henry Romero(MEXICO)
STANFORD/
RTXBU8L
February 20, 2009
Mark Tidwell (L) and Charles Rawl, former employees of billionaire Allen Stanford who quit and filed...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Former Stanford employees Tidwell and Rawl stand outside Houston law offices
Mark Tidwell (L) and Charles Rawl, former employees of billionaire Allen Stanford who quit and filed a whistleblower lawsuit against their employer, stand outside a law office in Houston, Texas, February 19, 2009. Stanford was preparing to surrender his passport after the FBI served him with court papers accusing him of massive fraud, a law enforcement official said on Thursday. REUTERS/Chris Baltimore (UNITED STATES)
STANFORD-MEXICO/
RTXBVCF
February 20, 2009
Oscar Santoyo, a client of Stanford Fondos speaks to a journalist, after he leaves Stanford office in...
Mexico City, Mexico
Oscar Santoyo, a client of Stanford Fondos, speaks to journalist after he leaves Stanford office in Mexico...
Oscar Santoyo, a client of Stanford Fondos speaks to a journalist, after he leaves Stanford office in Mexico City, February 20, 2009. Mexico's banking regulator is investigating a local Stanford bank unit for possible violation of banking laws, an official at the financial industry watchdog said on Thursday. The CNBV regulator is looking into whether Mexican unit Stanford Fondos broke laws on investing abroad, Carlos Lopez-Moctezuma, a senior official told Reuters. REUTERS/Henry Romero(MEXICO)
STANFORD-COLOMBIA/
RTXBTV1
February 19, 2009
Colombia's Financial Superintendent Roberto Borras speaks to the media during a news conference in Bogota...
Bogota, Colombia
Colombia's Financial Superintendent Borras speaks to the media during a news conference in Bogota
Colombia's Financial Superintendent Roberto Borras speaks to the media during a news conference in Bogota February 19, 2009. Colombia has asked U.S.-based Stanford representatives for details of local investors' overseas holdings in the scandal-hit financial empire, the market regulator said on Thursday. REUTERS/John Vizcaino (COLOMBIA)
SWITZERLAND/
RTXBSK1
February 18, 2009
A Stanford Group AG logo is seen on the main entrance of its building in Zurich February 18, 2009. REUTERS/Christian...
Zurich, Switzerland
A Stanford Group AG logo is seen on the main entrance of its building in Zurich
A Stanford Group AG logo is seen on the main entrance of its building in Zurich February 18, 2009. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (SWITZERLAND)
STANFORD/
RTXBQT5
February 17, 2009
A worker is seen in a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas February 17, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen Stanford...
Caracas, Venezuela
A worker is seen in a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas
A worker is seen in a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas February 17, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen Stanford and three of his companies were charged with "massive ongoing fraud" Tuesday as federal agents swooped in on his U.S. headquarters. In a complaint filed in federal court in Dallas, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused the cricket-loving Stanford, 58, and two other top executives at Stanford Financial Group of fraudulently selling $8 billion in high-yield certificates of deposit in a scheme that stretched from Texas to Antigua and around the world. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA)
SWITZERLAND/
RTXBSJL
February 18, 2009
A man is silhouetted as he walks past the Stanford Group AG building in Zurich February 18, 2009. REUTERS/Christian...
Zurich, Switzerland
A man is silhouetted as he walks past the Stanford Group AG building in Zurich
A man is silhouetted as he walks past the Stanford Group AG building in Zurich February 18, 2009. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (SWITZERLAND)
STANFORD/
RTXBQTS
February 17, 2009
A view of the outside of a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas February 17, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen...
Caracas, Venezuela
A view of the outside of a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas
A view of the outside of a Stanford Bank branch in Caracas February 17, 2009. Texas billionaire Allen Stanford and three of his companies were charged with "massive ongoing fraud" Tuesday as federal agents swooped in on his U.S. headquarters. In a complaint filed in federal court in Dallas, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused the cricket-loving Stanford, 58, and two other top executives at Stanford Financial Group of fraudulently selling $8 billion in high-yield certificates of deposit in a scheme that stretched from Texas to Antigua and around the world. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA)
STANFORD/VENEZUELA
RTXBS2P
February 18, 2009
People line up outside a branch of Stanford International in Caracas February 18, 2009. Hundreds of...
Caracas, Venezuela
People line up outside a branch of Stanford International in Caracas
People line up outside a branch of Stanford International in Caracas February 18, 2009. Hundreds of Venezuelans on Wednesday sought to withdraw their investments at local offices of Stanford International after U.S. authorities charged the company with "massive fraud." It was the second day that long lines formed at offices in Venezuela, people with investments at the company said. Venezuelans have an estimated $2.5 billion invested in Stanford International, Venezuela's banking regulator said. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA)
STANFORD/
RTXBRVG
February 18, 2009
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage February 18, 2009. Bank...
Collage, Antigua and Barbuda
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage February 18, 2009. Bank of Antigua, with three branches in the twin-island state of Antigua and Barbuda, is part of Texas billionaire Allen Stanford's sprawling global business interests but is separate from an Antigua-based offshore affiliate, Stanford International Bank Ltd (SIB), at the heart of fraud charges lodged by U.S. Regulators. The tycoon was charged with an $8 billion fraud on Tuesday. REUTERS/Philip Brown (ANTIGUA)
STANFORD/
RTXBRUE
February 18, 2009
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage February 18, 2009. Bank...
Collage, Antigua and Barbuda
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage
People seeking to withdraw funds line up outside the Bank of Antigua in Collage February 18, 2009. Bank of Antigua, with three branches in the twin-island state of Antigua and Barbuda, is part of Texas billionaire Allen Stanford's sprawling global business interests but is separate from an Antigua-based offshore affiliate, Stanford International Bank Ltd (SIB), at the heart of fraud charges lodged by U.S. Regulators. The tycoon was charged with an $8 billion fraud on Tuesday. REUTERS/Philip Brown (ANTIGUA)
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