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Search results for: high frequency trading

GLOBAL-TIME/
RTX4KY7I
January 26, 2018
A salesman at Breitling boutique shows one of the high-end dual frequency SOS pilot watches at Moda Mall...
Manama, Bahrain
A salesman at Breitling boutique shows one of the high-end dual frequency SOS pilot watches at Moda Mall...
A salesman at Breitling boutique shows one of the high-end dual frequency SOS pilot watches at Moda Mall in Manama, Bahrain, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MILKEN/
RTR3N3ML
April 29, 2014
Rishi Narang, Founding Principal of T2AM LLC speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate on High-Frequency...
Beverly Hills, UNITED STATES
Rishi Narang, Founding Principal of T2AM LLC speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate on High-Frequency...
Rishi Narang, Founding Principal of T2AM LLC speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate on High-Frequency Trading session of the 2014 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California April 29, 2014. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
MILKEN/
RTR3N3LN
April 29, 2014
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate...
Beverly Hills, UNITED STATES
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate...
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate on High-Frequency Trading session of the 2014 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California April 29, 2014. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
MILKEN/
RTR3N3L1
April 29, 2014
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate...
Beverly Hills, UNITED STATES
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate...
James McCaughan, CEO of Principal Global Investors speaks during the Trust and the Markets: A Debate on High-Frequency Trading session of the 2014 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California April 29, 2014. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
TDBANK/
RTR3JUXH
April 03, 2014
Customers leave a TD Waterhouse investment centre after the company held its annual general meeting in...
Calgary, Canada
Customers leave a TD Waterhouse investment centre after the company held its annual general meeting in...
Customers leave a TD Waterhouse investment centre after the company held its annual general meeting in Calgary, Alberta, April 3, 2014. Toronto-Dominion Bank Chief Executive Ed Clark said on Thursday he believes high frequency trading (HFT) gives an unfair advantage to some market participants and wants curbs by U.S. Regulators. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS)
TDBANK/
RTR3JUQA
April 03, 2014
General view of a TD Bank branch and its drive-thru after the company held its annual general meeting...
Calgary, Canada
General view of a TD Bank branch and its drive-thru after the company held its annual general meeting...
General view of a TD Bank branch and its drive-thru after the company held its annual general meeting in Calgary, Alberta, April 3, 2014. Toronto-Dominion Bank Chief Executive Ed Clark said on Thursday he believes high frequency trading (HFT) gives an unfair advantage to some market participants and wants curbs by U.S. Regulators. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTPA
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading...
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTP7
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading...
Author Michael Lewis smiles during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTP4
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTOI
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTNZ
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTN6
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency...
Author Michael Lewis gestures during an interview at Reuters regarding his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS)
USA/
RTR3JTLF
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS PORTRAIT)
USA/
RTR3JTKY
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS PORTRAIT)
USA/
RTR3JTKU
April 03, 2014
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT)...
Author Michael Lewis poses for a portrait while promoting his book about high-frequency trading (HFT) named "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt," in New York April 3, 2014. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA BUSINESS PROFILE)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WV0
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUZ
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUY
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUX
July 24, 2013
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22,...
Paris, France
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUW
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUU
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUT
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUS
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36KOZ
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (L) smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court with his...
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (L) smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court with his lawyer Kevin Marino (2nd L) in New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36KO7
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov appears at Manhattan Criminal Court in New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov appears at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov appears at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Steven Hirsch/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36KNJ
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (C) appears with his lawyer Kevin Marino (L)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov appears with his lawyer Marino at Manhattan Criminal...
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (C) appears with his lawyer Kevin Marino (L) at Manhattan Criminal Court in New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Steven Hirsch/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36KMU
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (R) smiles at his lawyer Kevin Marino in Manhattan...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov smiles at his lawyer Marino in Manhattan Criminal...
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (R) smiles at his lawyer Kevin Marino in Manhattan Criminal Court at New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Steven Hirsch/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36KL5
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (2nd L) waits to appear in Manhattan Criminal...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov waits to appear in Manhattan Criminal Court at New...
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (2nd L) waits to appear in Manhattan Criminal Court at New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Steven Hirsch/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
GOLDMAN-PROGRAMMER/CHARGES
RTR36K9H
August 09, 2012
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (L) smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court...
New York, UNITED STATES
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Aleynikov smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court in New...
Former Goldman Sachs computer programmer Sergey Aleynikov (L) smiles as he exits Manhattan Criminal Court in New York, August 9, 2012. Aleynikov, who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
FINANCIAL-REGULATION/ALGOS
RTR2QNEY
September 01, 2011
The Nasdaq Composite stock market index is seen inside their studios at Times Square in New York in this...
New York, UNITED STATES
File image of the Nasdaq Composite stock market index seen inside their studios at Times Square in New...
The Nasdaq Composite stock market index is seen inside their studios at Times Square in New York in this file image from April 1, 2011. U.S. securities regulators have taken the unprecedented step of asking high-frequency trading firms to hand over the details of their trading strategies, and in some cases, their secret computer codes. Picture taken April 1, 2011. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWR
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWP
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWO
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWK
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWJ
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWI
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWF
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWD
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT)
FINANCE-SUMMIT/ESMA
RTR2JBWA
March 02, 2011
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam
Outgoing Managing Director of the Dutch Financial Market Regulator, AFM, Steven Maijoor, speaks to Reuters in an exclusive interview in Amsterdam March 1, 2011. Maijoor, who officially joins as chairman of the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on April 1, said that the EU securities watchdog has begun a review of the use of high-frequency trading, given the huge economic impact and risks involved, and will state its position by year-end, the incoming chairman said on Wednesday. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
GOLDMAN/ALEYNIKOV
RTR2AFP4
February 17, 2010
Sergey Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group...
New York, UNITED STATES
Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York
Sergey Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group Inc computer programmer pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to charges he stole code from the bank's high-frequency trading platform before leaving the firm for another company last year. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
GOLDMAN/ALEYNIKOV
RTR2AFOY
February 17, 2010
Sergey Aleynikov and his lawyer, Sabrina Shroff, depart from federal court in New York February 17, 2010....
New York, UNITED STATES
Aleynikov and his lawyer depart from federal court in New York
Sergey Aleynikov and his lawyer, Sabrina Shroff, depart from federal court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group Inc computer programmer pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to charges he stole code from the bank's high-frequency trading platform before leaving the firm for another company last year. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
GOLDMAN/ALEYNIKOV
RTR2AFOQ
February 17, 2010
Sergey Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group...
New York, UNITED STATES
Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York
Sergey Aleynikov departs from federal court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. computer programmer pleaded not guilty to charges he stole code from the bank's high-frequency trading platform before leaving the firm for another company last year. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
GOLDMAN/ALEYNIKOV
RTR2AFOI
February 17, 2010
Sergey Aleynikov departs from Federal Court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs...
New York, UNITED STATES
Aleynikov departs from Federal Court in New York
Sergey Aleynikov departs from Federal Court in New York February 17, 2010. The former Goldman Sachs Group Inc computer programmer pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to charges he stole code from the bank's high-frequency trading platform before leaving the firm for another company last year. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ5
December 02, 2009
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ4
December 02, 2009
An employee works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
An employee works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ3
December 02, 2009
An employee works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
An employee works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ2
December 02, 2009
The company logo is seen on the door of the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009....
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
The company logo is seen on the door of the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ1
December 02, 2009
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCQ0
December 02, 2009
An employee sits below a television screen showing stock information at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank,...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
An employee sits below a television screen showing stock information at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPZ
December 02, 2009
A white board is seen covered with writing at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17,...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
A white board is seen covered with writing at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPY
December 02, 2009
Chief Technology Officer Mike Beller (R) and CEO Manoj Narang work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank,...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Chief Technology Officer Mike Beller (R) and CEO Manoj Narang work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this picture taken November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPX
December 02, 2009
Chief Technology Officer Mike Beller works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this picture...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Chief Technology Officer Mike Beller works at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this picture taken November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPW
December 02, 2009
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Employees work at the Tradeworx office in Red Bank, New Jersey November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPV
December 02, 2009
Manoj Narang, founder and CEO of Tradeworx, sits in his company's office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Manoj Narang, founder and CEO of Tradeworx, sits in his company's office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this picture taken November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/ REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
HIGHFREQUENCY/
RTXRCPT
December 02, 2009
Manoj Narang (R), founder and CEO of Tradeworx, speaks to an employee at his company's office in Red...
Red Bank, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report HIGHFREQUENCY/
Manoj Narang (R), founder and CEO of Tradeworx, speaks to an employee at his company's office in Red Bank, New Jersey in this picture taken November 17, 2009. Inside the offices of Tradeworx, an emerging player in the secretive and controversial world of high-frequency trading, it's dead quiet as staffers pore over the "tape," financial industry speak for the record of the day's transactions. Picture taken November 17, 2009. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
CHINA
RTRGWOQ
April 06, 2004
A Chinese visitor receives a massage demonstration from a promoter using an 'infra red high-frequency...
Nanjing, China - Peoples Republic of
VISITOR RECEIVES A MASSAGE DEMONSTRATION IN NANJING.
A Chinese visitor receives a massage demonstration from a promoter using an 'infra red high-frequency blood circulation machine" at a products exhibition in Nanjing, the capital city of China's Jiangsu province April 6, 2004. The product, which can massage almost all parts of the body, sells for 980 yuan ($118). The exhibit coincided with the Jiangsu International Manufacturing Industry Forum featuring locally manufactured products from toys, appliances, massage devices, sports gears, handicrafts as well as other imported goods. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/FA
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