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Search results for: quantum computer

TECH-CES/
RTS2XJDS
January 07, 2020
A man takes a photo of a model of the IBM Q System One quantum computer during the 2020 CES in Las Vegas,...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
A man takes a photo of a model of the IBM Q System One quantum computer during the 2020 CES in Las Vegas...
A man takes a photo of a model of the IBM Q System One quantum computer during the 2020 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. January 7, 2020. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
AUSTRIA-GLACIER/
RTX79OTT
November 20, 2019
A computer monitor displays the detection program interpreting the signal of the avalanche photodiode...
Heidelberg, Germany
A computer monitor displays the detection program interpreting the signal of the avalanche photodiode...
A computer monitor displays the detection program interpreting the signal of the avalanche photodiode APD of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis system at the ArTTA laboratory at the Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, December 6, 2018. Atom Trap Trace Analysis for 39Ar is an ultra-sensitive detection method based on principles of quantum mechanics and found its first application in dating ground water and ice samples. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
What is quantum computing and how will it affect you?
8 PICTURES
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT8J
December 08, 2015
Rupak Biswas, director of exploration technology at NASA Ames research center, speaks in front of a D-Wave...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
Rupak Biswas speaks in front of a D-Wave 2X quantum computer during a media tour at the NASA Ames Research...
Rupak Biswas, director of exploration technology at NASA Ames research center, speaks in front of a D-Wave 2X quantum computer during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, December 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT8C
December 08, 2015
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
A D-Wave 2X Quantum Computer pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, December 8, 2015. Housed inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility, the 1,097-qubit system is the largest quantum annealer in the world and a joint collaboration between NASA, Google, and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT8B
December 08, 2015
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
A D-Wave 2X Quantum Computer pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California December 8, 2015. Housed inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility, the 1,097-qubit system is the largest quantum annealer in the world and a joint collaboration between NASA, Google, and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT87
December 08, 2015
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
A D-Wave 2X Quantum Computer pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
A D-Wave 2X quantum computer is pictured during a media tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, December 8, 2015. Housed inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility, the 1,097-qubit system is the largest quantum annealer in the world and a joint collaboration between NASA, Google, and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT7Z
December 08, 2015
David Bell, director of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science at the Universities Space...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
Bell speaks on a panel during a tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory inside the NASA...
David Bell, director of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science at the Universities Space Research Association, speaks on a panel during a tour of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, December 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NASA-RESEARCH/QUANTUMCOMPUTING
RTX1XT7Q
December 08, 2015
(L-R) Rupak Biswas, director of exploration technology at NASA Ames research center speaks next to Hartmut...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
Biswas from NASA, Neven from Google and Bell, director of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science...
(L-R) Rupak Biswas, director of exploration technology at NASA Ames research center speaks next to Hartmut Neven, director of engineering at Google and David Bell, director of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science at the Universities Space Research Asociation during a tour of the Quantum Artificial Inteligence Laboratory (QuAIL) inside the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, December 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSM
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland smiles while talking with friend prior to a news conference in Boulder,...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland smiles while talking with friend in Boulder after learning he and Haroche of...
U.S. physicist David Wineland smiles while talking with friend prior to a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSL
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland talks about is experiment in his lab during a media tour after a news conference...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland talks about is experiment in his lab in Boulder after learning he and Haroche...
U.S. physicist David Wineland talks about is experiment in his lab during a media tour after a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSH
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland (R) has his photo taken by Dr. Shane Allman (L) while shaking hands with...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland has his photo taken by Dr. Allman while shaking hands with Dr. Lecoca at a reception...
U.S. physicist David Wineland (R) has his photo taken by Dr. Shane Allman (L) while shaking hands with Dr. Florent Lecoca at a reception in Boulder, Colorado after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSG
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland shakes hands with colleague Fred Wells after a news conference in Boulder,...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland shakes hands with colleague in Boulder after learning he and Haroche of France...
U.S. physicist David Wineland shakes hands with colleague Fred Wells after a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSD
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YSA
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder
U.S. physicist David Wineland speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YS8
October 09, 2012
Dr. Carl Cornell (L), Noble Prize winner in 1995, and U.S. physicist David Wineland (R) joke before the...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland joke before a news conference in Boulder after learning that he and Haroche of...
Dr. Carl Cornell (L), Noble Prize winner in 1995, and U.S. physicist David Wineland (R) joke before the start of a news conference in Boulder, Colorado after the latter learnt that he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YS0
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland (L) laughs with John Cumalat (R) before speaking to reporters at a news...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland laughs before speaking to reporters in Boulder after learning he and Haroche...
U.S. physicist David Wineland (L) laughs with John Cumalat (R) before speaking to reporters at a news conference in Boulder, Colorado after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/QUANTUM
RTR38YRY
October 09, 2012
U.S. physicist David Wineland jokes with colleagues prior to the start of a news conference in Boulder,...
Boulder, UNITED STATES
U.S. physicist Wineland jokes with colleagues prior to the start of a news conference in Boulder
U.S. physicist David Wineland jokes with colleagues prior to the start of a news conference in Boulder, Colorado, after learning he and Serge Haroche of France were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, October 9, 2012. The two men were awarded the prize for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. REUTERS/Mark Leffingwell (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YLW
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris,...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche poses after a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YKK
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YK1
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJT
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, reacts as he attends a news conference...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, reacts as he attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJM
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris,...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche poses after a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJH
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJC
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJ9
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YJ3
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris,...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche poses after a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, poses after a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YIX
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YIR
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YII
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-PHYSICS/
RTR38YIG
October 09, 2012
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October...
Paris, France
French scientist and Nobel Prize for Physics winner Haroche attends a news conference in Paris
Nobel Prize for Physics winner, French scientist Serge Haroche, attends a news conference in Paris, October 9, 2012. Serge Haroche and American David Wineland, both 68, won the Nobel Prize on Tuesday for finding ways to measure quantum particles without destroying them, which could make it possible to build a new kind of computer far more powerful than any seen before. The French and the American scientists found ways to manipulate the very smallest particles of matter and light to observe strange behaviour that previously could only be imagined in equations and thought experiments. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE- Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
RTR28AXT
December 23, 2009
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/ - Diagram detailing chronological progress of supercomputer technology. Previously...
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/ - Diagram detailing chronological progress of supercomputer technology. Previously transmitted on 27/09/2007
RTR28AXS
December 23, 2009
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/ - Diagram detailing chronological progress of supercomputer technology. Previously...
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/ C
COMPUTERS-QUANTUM/ - Diagram detailing chronological progress of supercomputer technology. Previously transmitted on 27/09/2007
CHAYES
RTXM324
July 09, 2003
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes talks to Reuters during a five-day...
Sydney, Australia
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes talks to Reuters during a five-day.....
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes talks to Reuters during a five-day International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics in Sydney July 9, 2003. [The Theory Group that Chayes and her husband head is at the cutting edge of blending mathematics, theoretical physics and computer science to solve problems, develop quantum computers and probe the frontiers of future cryptography. They are also heavily involved in Microsoft co-founder Bill Gate's push to make the world's top software firm a leading player in the search engine field.]
TECH MICROSOFT CHAYES
RTRB8Q
July 09, 2003
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes talks
to Reuters during a five-day...
Sydney, Australia
THEORETICAL PHYSICIST AND MATHEMATICS TALENT JENNIFER TOUR CHAYES AT A
MATHEMATICS CONGRESS IN SYDNEY....
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes talks
to Reuters during a five-day International Congress on Industrial and
Applied Mathematics in Sydney July 9, 2003. The Theory Group that
Chayes and her husband head is at the cutting edge of blending
mathematics, theoretical physics and computer science to solve
problems, develop quantum computers and probe the frontiers of future
cryptography. They are also heavily involved in Microsoft co-founder
Bill Gate's push to make the world's top software firm a leading player
in the search engine field. REUTERS/David Gray

DG/FA
TECH MICROSOFT CHAYES
RTRB8M
July 09, 2003
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes is
reflected in a mirror at a five-day...
Sydney, Australia
THEORETICAL PHYSICIST AND MATHEMATICS TALENT JENNIFER TOUR CHAYES POSE
AT A CONFERENCE IN SYDNEY.
Theoretical physicist and mathematics talent Jennifer Tour Chayes is
reflected in a mirror at a five-day International Congress on
Industrial and Applied Mathematics in Sydney July 9, 2003. The Theory
Group that Chayes and her husband head is at the cutting edge of
blending mathematics, theoretical physics and computer science to solve
problems, develop quantum computers and probe the frontiers of future
cryptography. They are also heavily involved in Microsoft co-founder
Bill Gate's push to make the world's top software firm a leading player
in the search engine field. REUTERS/David Gray

DG/FA
ISRAEL
RTXKFTR
April 13, 2001
The inventor of the VirTouch computer mouse for the blind and partially sighted, Ramon Gouzman, poses...
Jerusalem, Israel
The inventor of the VirTouch computer mouse for the blind and partially sighted, Ramon Gouzman, pose.....
The inventor of the VirTouch computer mouse for the blind and partially sighted, Ramon Gouzman, poses with an example of his invention Jerusalem March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.
ISRAEL
RTXKFTQ
April 13, 2001
Blind Israeli Ariel Gamliel uses a special computer mouse to study a map of the Old City of Jerusaelm...
Jerusalem, Israel
Blind Israeli Ariel Gamliel uses a special computer mouse to study a map of the Old City of Jerusael.....
Blind Israeli Ariel Gamliel uses a special computer mouse to study a map of the Old City of Jerusaelm March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.
ISRAEL
RTXKFTP
April 13, 2001
Blind Israeli Tammy Rimon uses a computer mouse to play a video game as her seeing-eye dog waits under...
Jerusalem, Israel
Blind Israeli Tammy Rimon uses a computer mouse to play a video game as her seeing-eye dog waits und.....
Blind Israeli Tammy Rimon uses a computer mouse to play a video game as her seeing-eye dog waits under her chair in Jerusalem March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.
TECH ISRAEL BLIND
RTRGXY3
March 05, 2001
Blind Israeli Ariel Gamliel uses a special computer mouse to study a map of the Old City of Jerusaelm...
Jerusalem
FEATURE FOR RELEASE WITH BC-TECH-ISRAEL-BLIND.
Blind Israeli Ariel Gamliel uses a special computer mouse to study a map of the Old City of Jerusaelm March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.

NB/AA
TECH ISRAEL BLIND
RTRGXX4
March 05, 2001
The inventor of the VirTouch computer mouse for the blind and partially sighted, Ramon Gouzman, poses...
Jerusalem
INVENTOR OF VIRTOUCH MOUSE RAMON GOUZMAN WITH HIS INVENTION IN JERUSALEM.
The inventor of the VirTouch computer mouse for the blind and partially sighted, Ramon Gouzman, poses with an example of his invention Jerusalem March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.

NB
TECH ISRAEL BLIND
RTRGXWZ
March 05, 2001
Blind Israeli Tammy Rimon uses a computer mouse to play a video game as her seeing-eye dog waits under...
Jerusalem
BLIND ISRAELI TAMMY RIMON USES A NEW MOUSE FOR BLIND PEOPLE TO PLAY COMPUTER GAME IN JERUSALEM.
Blind Israeli Tammy Rimon uses a computer mouse to play a video game as her seeing-eye dog waits under her chair in Jerusalem March 5, 2001. The mouse acts as the eyes of the partially sighted and blind by helping them view computer graphics through touch. Manufacturers tout the VirTouch systems (VTS), as a quantum leap toward their integration into the world of the sighted. VTS allows the blind to recognise graphic shapes, pictures, play tactile computer games and read text in normal letters or Braille by placing fingers in three pads that respond when a cursor on the computer screen touches a graphic or letter.

NB
TECH INDIA EDUCATION
RTR9U6N
October 23, 2000
Indian students watch a downloaded videotaped lecture at the Quantum Institute in New Delhi October 23,...
New Delhi, Republic of India
STUDENTS WATCH A DOWNLOADED VIDEOTAPED LECTURE IN NEW DELHI.
Indian students watch a downloaded videotaped lecture at the Quantum Institute in New Delhi October 23, 2000. The videotaped lecture was downloaded from a leading U.S. university, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The students who enrolled for the online computer science course will get the same degree as the U.S. university's on-campus students. Online education is catching on fast in India, with portals and institutes offering courses, homework and help to students over the Internet.

KK/HL
NOBEL SWEDEN
RTRK871
December 10, 1998
(L-R) Daniel C. Tsui of the USA, Germany's Horst L. Stoermer and Robert B. Laughlin of the USA, winners...
Stockholm, Sweden
NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS AT AWARDS CEREMONY.
(L-R) Daniel C. Tsui of the USA, Germany's Horst L. Stoermer and Robert B. Laughlin of the USA, winners of the Nobel prizes in physics sit next to John A. Pople of Britain, Nobel prize winner in chemistry during awards ceremony December 10. Tsui, Stroemer and Laughlin were awared for their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations and Pople, a professor at the Northwestern University in Evanston (USA) got the award for his development of computional methods in quantum chemistry.

PEM/ME
NOBEL SWEDEN
RTRK7U1
December 10, 1998
John A. Pople from Great Britain receives the Nobel prize for chemistry from Swedish King Carl Gustaf...
Stockholm, Sweden
JOHN POPLE RECEIVES NOBEL PRIZE IN CHEMISTRY.
John A. Pople from Great Britain receives the Nobel prize for chemistry from Swedish King Carl Gustaf December 10. Pople, who is professor of the Northwestern University in Evanston (U.S.A.), got the award for his development of computional methods in quantum chemistry. The second part of the Nobel prize for chemistry was awarded to Walter Kohn from the United States.

PEM/ME
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