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Search results for: Bay St. Louis

STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJL2
September 14, 2020
Kitesurfers surf over the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Kitesurfers surf over the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis
Kitesurfers surf over the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJKS
September 14, 2020
A kitesurfer surfs the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Kitesurfers surf the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis
A kitesurfer surfs the ocean as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJKQ
September 14, 2020
A gas pump is seen wrapped in plastic as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S.,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A gas pump is seen wrapped in plastic as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis
A gas pump is seen wrapped in plastic as Hurricane Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJ3T
September 14, 2020
Sam Dorsey helps Dianne Fredrick load a sandbag in the back of her truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Sam Dorsey helps Dianne Fredrick load a sandbag in the back of her truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches...
Sam Dorsey helps Dianne Fredrick load a sandbag in the back of her truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJ3R
September 14, 2020
Cornell Dorsey ties a sandbag in the back of his truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St....
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Cornell Dorsey ties a sandbag in the back of his truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St....
Cornell Dorsey ties a sandbag in the back of his truck as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJ3Q
September 14, 2020
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-SALLY/
RTX7VJ3S
September 14, 2020
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis
Rodney and Peggy Thomas fill sandbags as Tropical Storm Sally approaches in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-GORDON/
RTS202LF
September 05, 2018
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon...
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
STORM-GORDON/
RTS201EO
September 04, 2018
Residents fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Residents fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis
Residents fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-GORDON/
RTS201DK
September 04, 2018
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon...
Inmates with the Hancock County Department of Corrections fill bags with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-GORDON/
RTS201D6
September 04, 2018
An inmate with the Hancock County Department of Corrections helps Janice Labat fill a bag with sand as...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
An inmate with the Hancock County Department of Corrections helps Janice Labat fill a bag with sand as...
An inmate with the Hancock County Department of Corrections helps Janice Labat fill a bag with sand as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, U.S., September 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1NI
August 28, 2015
Boutique shops are seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Boutique shops are seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
Boutique shops are seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1ND
August 28, 2015
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1NC
August 28, 2015
The Bay Saint Louis Municipal Harbor is pictured in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
The Bay Saint Louis Municipal Harbor is pictued in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
The Bay Saint Louis Municipal Harbor is pictured in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1NA
August 28, 2015
The Hancock County court house is pictured in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
The Hancock County court house is pictured in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,
The Hancock County court house is pictured in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1N6
August 28, 2015
A boutique shop is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A boutique shop is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
A boutique shop is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1N4
August 28, 2015
An empty lot is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
An empty lot is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
An empty lot is seen on Main St. in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1MW
August 28, 2015
Bay St. Louis Mayor Les Fillingame poses for a photograph at his office in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Bay St. Louis Mayor Fillingame poses for a photograph at his office in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,
Bay St. Louis Mayor Les Fillingame poses for a photograph at his office in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1MI
August 28, 2015
A man paints the wall of an antique shop in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A man paints the wall of an antique shop in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
A man paints the wall of an antique shop in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1MF
August 28, 2015
A man drives past Gallery 220 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A man drives past Gallery 220 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
A man drives past Gallery 220 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1MD
August 28, 2015
A man crosses the street in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A man crosses the street in Bay St. Louis
A man crosses the street in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
USA-KATRINA/MISSISSIPPI
RTX1Q1M9
August 28, 2015
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
Jennifer Green, manager of Gallery 220, poses for a photograph in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 26, 2015. Ten years ago this week, the eye of Hurricane Katrina ripped through Pass Christian and Bay St. Louis, which face each other across a small bay 60 miles (97 km) east of New Orleans. The storm, the costliest disaster of its kind in U.S. history, caused some of the worst damage in the region here, leaving few buildings standing, killing dozens and forcing thousands to flee. The appearance now is one of impressive regeneration, thanks in part to government grants that helped these towns and others nearby recover more quickly than some urban areas of New Orleans. But behind the fresh white paint of the city buildings and the growing optimism, there are signs of persistent difficulties for these picturesque towns, which can no longer rely on government grants. Picture taken August 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQY7
September 03, 2011
A swing set sits in a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A swing set sits in a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly...
A swing set sits in a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Tropical Storm Lee threatened the Louisiana coast on Friday with torrential rains and flooding and shut nearly half of U.S. offshore crude oil production and a third of offshore gas production. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQVX
September 03, 2011
Fred Shipman sits in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Fred Shipman sits in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical...
Fred Shipman sits in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Tropical Storm Lee threatened the Louisiana coast on Friday with torrential rains and flooding and shut nearly half of U.S. offshore crude oil production and a third of offshore gas production. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQVP
September 03, 2011
Frede Shipman and Debbie Shifter stand in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Frede Shipman and Debbie Shifter stand in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis
Frede Shipman and Debbie Shifter stand in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Tropical Storm Lee threatened the Louisiana coast on Friday with torrential rains and flooding and shut nearly half of U.S. offshore crude oil production and a third of offshore gas production. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQVF
September 03, 2011
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical...
Bay St. Louis, United Kingdom
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Tropical Storm Lee threatened the Louisiana coast on Friday with torrential rains and flooding and shut nearly half of U.S. offshore crude oil production and a third of offshore gas production. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQTQ
September 03, 2011
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical...
Debbie Shifter stands in the middle of a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQTO
September 03, 2011
Ken Roberts walks through a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Ken Roberts walks through a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes...
Ken Roberts walks through a flooded trailer park in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQQO
September 03, 2011
Kristen Stanford, 16, (L) walks along the beach with her dogs and her father Brian in Bay St. Louis,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Kristen Stanford walks along the beach with her dogs and her father Brian in Bay St. Louis as Tropical...
Kristen Stanford, 16, (L) walks along the beach with her dogs and her father Brian in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQOZ
September 03, 2011
Brian Stanford (L) walks with his daughter Kristen, 16, on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Brian Stanford walks with his daughter Kristen on the beach in Bay St. Louis as Tropical Storm Lee slowly...
Brian Stanford (L) walks with his daughter Kristen, 16, on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQOO
September 03, 2011
Brian Stanford walks with his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Brian Stanford walks with his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall...
Brian Stanford walks with his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
STORM-USA/GULF
RTR2QQOD
September 03, 2011
Brian Stanford walks his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Brian Stanford walks his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall...
Brian Stanford walks his dog on the beach in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Tropical Storm Lee slowly makes landfall September 3, 2011. Slow-moving Tropical Storm Lee strengthened as it lumbered toward the Louisiana coast on Saturday, bringing torrential rains that will put the flood defenses of low-lying New Orleans to the test. REUTERS/Dan Anderson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMTO
May 08, 2010
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. The class was designed to qualify people for paid positions to work in hands-on oil cleanup if the BP oil spill reaches the coast. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMTN
May 08, 2010
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. The class was designed to qualify people for paid positions to work in hands-on oil cleanup if the BP oil spill reaches the coast. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMTM
May 08, 2010
A man raises his hand to ask a question at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A man raises his hand to ask a question at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay...
A man raises his hand to ask a question at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. The class was designed to qualify people for paid positions to work in hands-on oil cleanup if the BP oil spill reaches the coast. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMTJ
May 08, 2010
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis
People listen at a free BP-provided hazardous material handling class at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. The class was designed to qualify people for paid positions to work in hands-on oil cleanup if the BP oil spill reaches the coast. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMTE
May 08, 2010
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis...
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. L-R are Dawson McCall, Jonas Powers and Judith McCall. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMS8
May 08, 2010
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis...
A mother and two of her sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. L-R are Judith McCall, Dawson McCall and Jonas Powers. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMS5
May 08, 2010
A mother and her three sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A mother and her three boys remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis...
A mother and her three sons remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. L-R are Jonas Powers, Dawson McCall, Judith McCall and Sierre Anton. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMS4
May 08, 2010
Brothers Jonas Powers (L) and Dawson McCall (R) remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Brothers Jonas Powers and Dawson McCall remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at...
Brothers Jonas Powers (L) and Dawson McCall (R) remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMS2
May 08, 2010
Brothers Sierre Anton (L) and Jonas Powers (R) remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Brothers Sierre Anton and Jonas Powers remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at...
Brothers Sierre Anton (L) and Jonas Powers (R) remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
ENVIRONMENT-OIL/
RTR2DMRC
May 08, 2010
A mother and her three boys remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis,...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A mother and her three boys remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis...
A mother and her three boys remove debris from the beach in a coast-wide cleanup effort at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi May 8, 2010. Citizens all along the Gulf of Mexico were asked to remove debris that could hinder efforts to clean up the BP oil spill if it reaches the shore. L-R are Jonas Powers, Dawson McCall, Sierre Anton and Judith McCall. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7YW
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7YN
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7Y6
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7XZ
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7XE
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7X6
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7WY
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush arrives to make a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Bush arrives to make a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
U.S. President George W. Bush arrives to make a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA-BUSH/
RTR1T7WV
August 29, 2007
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the...
U.S. President George W. Bush makes a statement on the Hurricane Katrina rebuilding efforts at Our Lady of the Gulf Community Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 29, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS
RTR1J4FN
November 07, 2006
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place held at a church, during U.S. midterm elections...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St....
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place held at a church, during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, November 7, 2006. REUTERS/Lee Celano (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS
RTR1J4FM
November 07, 2006
A family departs a polling place at a church heavily damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during U.S. midterm...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A family departs a polling place at a church heavily damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during U.S. midterm...
A family departs a polling place at a church heavily damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, November 7, 2006. REUTERS/Lee Celano (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS
RTR1J4FL
November 07, 2006
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place held at a church, during U.S. midterm elections...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St....
A voter uses an electronic voting machine at a polling place held at a church, during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, November 7, 2006. REUTERS/Lee Celano (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS
RTR1J4FK
November 07, 2006
A voter prepares to enter a polling place near a church steeple damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A voter prepares to enter a polling place near a church steeple damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during...
A voter prepares to enter a polling place near a church steeple damaged in Hurricane Katrina, during U.S. midterm elections in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, November 7, 2006. REUTERS/Lee Celano (UNITED STATES)
WEATHER KATRINA
RTRM2R7
August 31, 2005
Man tries to make a call while standing on a cement block in front of a washed out part of US 90 in Bay...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Man tries to make a call while standing on a cement block in front of a washed out part of US 90 in Bay...
Man tries to make a call while standing on a cement block in front of a washed out part of US 90 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Kevin Schaumburg tries to make a cell phone call while standing on a cement block in front of a washed out part of U.S. 90 in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi August 31, 2005. Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast on August 29, caused numerous deaths, severe property damage and power outages in that part of the region. REUTERS/Frank Polich
WEATHER KATRINA
RTRM2QN
August 31, 2005
A man drives a tractor past a row of damaged houses in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi August 31, 2005. Hurricane...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
A man drives a tractor past houses in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi....
A man drives a tractor past a row of damaged houses in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi August 31, 2005. Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast on August 29, caused numerous deaths, severe property damage and power outages in that part of the region. REUTERS/Frank Polich FJP/DH
WEATHER KATRINA
RTRM2P6
August 31, 2005
Clothes hang on a mailbox and in trees, and a car sits in a ditch in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina...
Bay St. Louis, UNITED STATES
Clothes hang on mailbox in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.
Clothes hang on a mailbox and in trees, and a car sits in a ditch in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi August 31, 2005. Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast August 29, caused numerous deaths, severe property damage and power outages in that part of the region. REUTERS/Frank Polich FJP/DH
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