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Search results for: Rare Earth mineral

USA-MINERALS/
RTX1IC9H
June 30, 2015
Samples of rare earth minerals from left, Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
Samples of rare earth minerals, Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate are...
Samples of rare earth minerals from left, Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate are on display during a tour of Molycorp's Mountain Pass Rare Earth facility in Mountain Pass, California June 29, 2015. REUTERS/David Becker
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHGB
July 05, 2011
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth from the United States, is pictured next to cell phones,...
Tokyo, Japan
Photo illustration of bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth from the United States, pictured in Tokyo...
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth from the United States, is pictured next to cell phones, which utilises the minerals during manufacturing at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, in this photo illustration taken July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHG3
July 05, 2011
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate...
Tokyo, Japan
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured in Tokyo
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHFY
July 05, 2011
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate...
Tokyo, Japan
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured in Tokyo
A bastnaesite mineral containing rare earth is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHEJ
July 05, 2011
Mud samples extracted from below the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, is pictured...
Tokyo, Japan
Mud samples extracted from below the Pacific ocean surface is pictured in Tokyo
Mud samples extracted from below the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHEH
July 05, 2011
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface...
Tokyo, Japan
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface...
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHEE
July 05, 2011
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, shows off a mud sample...
Tokyo, Japan
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, shows off a mud sample...
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, shows off a mud sample extracted from the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, during a photo opportunity at his laboratory in Tokyo July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHE0
July 05, 2011
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample...
Tokyo, Japan
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample...
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample extracted from the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, during a photo opportunity at his laboratory in Tokyo July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHDZ
July 05, 2011
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample...
Tokyo, Japan
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample...
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, looks at a mud sample extracted from the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, during a photo opportunity at his laboratory in Tokyo July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHDS
July 05, 2011
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, displays a mud sample...
Tokyo, Japan
Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, displays a mud sample extracted...
Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, displays a mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, at his laboratory in Tokyo July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
RAREEARTH/JAPAN
RTR2OHDR
July 05, 2011
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface...
Tokyo, Japan
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface...
A mud sample extracted from the depths of about 4,000 metres (13,123 ft) below the Pacific ocean surface where rare earth elements were found, is pictured at a laboratory of Yasuhiro Kato, an associate professor of earth science at the University of Tokyo, July 5, 2011. Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59K
November 03, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59I
November 03, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59D
November 03, 2010
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant as he takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings...
Baotou, China
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of...
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant as he takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59B
November 03, 2010
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang...
Baotou, China
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang...
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU598
November 03, 2010
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of...
Baotou, China
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of...
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of a rare earth smelting plant in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU597
November 03, 2010
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth...
Baotou, China
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth...
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU595
November 03, 2010
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village,...
Baotou, China
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village,...
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU592
November 03, 2010
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant...
Baotou, China
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant...
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant spews heavily polluted water into near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU590
November 03, 2010
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing...
Baotou, China
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing...
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing the banner that reads "Be at the vanguard of rare earths' business, create the mother ship for Chinese rare earths" near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58X
November 03, 2010
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Baotou, China
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58W
November 03, 2010
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Baotou, China
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58V
November 03, 2010
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast...
Baotou, China
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast...
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58S
November 03, 2010
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near...
Baotou, China
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near...
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58Q
November 03, 2010
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast...
Baotou, China
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast...
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58G
November 03, 2010
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia...
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/
RTXU1HY
October 31, 2010
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing...
Baotou, China
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing...
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HW
October 31, 2010
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HV
October 31, 2010
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HR
October 31, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HO
October 31, 2010
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
Baotou, China
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HM
October 31, 2010
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
multiple cities, China
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1HK
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near the town of Damao, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HG
October 31, 2010
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory...
Baotou, China
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory...
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory in the city of Baotou, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The factory refines China's rare earth metals - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1EC
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, watches over pots containing the rare...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, watches over pots containing the rare earth...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, watches over pots containing the rare earth metal Lanthanum before he pours it into a mould near the town of Damao, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT POLITICS EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-RAREEARTH/
RTXU1E6
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, prepares to pour molten rare earth metal...
DAMAO, China
A worker at a smelting workshop prepares to pour molten rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, prepares to pour molten rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near the town of Damao in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
CHINA-RAREEARTH/
RTXU1E2
October 31, 2010
Molten rare earth metal Lanthanum is poured into a mould at Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop near...
DAMAO, China
Molten rare earth metal Lanthanum is poured into a mould at a smelting workshop near the town of Damao...
Molten rare earth metal Lanthanum is poured into a mould at Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop near the town of Damao in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
CHINA-RAREEARTH/
RTXU1E1
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, prepares to pour the rare earth metal...
DAMAO, China
A worker at the a smelting workshop prepares to pour the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, prepares to pour the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near the town of Damao in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
CHINA-
RTXU1CM
October 31, 2010
A worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop for rare earth metals, walks through thick smoke...
DAMAO, China
A worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop for rare earth metals, walks through thick smoke...
A worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop for rare earth metals, walks through thick smoke billowing from factories next door near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1CK
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal Lanthanum before he pours it into a mould near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1CJ
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near the town of Damao, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1C1
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal Lanthanum before he pours it into a mould near the town of Damao, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1C0
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, rests his leg on a tray containing the...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, rests his leg on a tray containing the rare...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, rests his leg on a tray containing the rare earth metal Lanthanum in front of melting pots near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1BU
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, walks out into the storing yard while...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, walks out into the storing yard while taking...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, walks out into the storing yard while taking a break from working on making moulds of the rare earth metal Lanthanum near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1BQ
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing the rare earth metal Lanthanum before he pours it into a mould near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT POLITICS EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU1BO
October 31, 2010
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum...
DAMAO, China
Ren, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a...
Ren Limin, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, pours the rare earth metal Lanthanum into a mould near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT POLITICS EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-
RTXU1BH
October 31, 2010
Jia Yulong, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing rare earth...
DAMAO, China
Jia, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing rare earth metal...
Jia Yulong, a worker at the Jinyuan Company's smelting workshop, stokes the pots containing rare earth metal Lanthanum before he pours it into a mould near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXTVVA
October 27, 2010
Marks made by an excavator is pictured at the old site of a rare earth metals mine on the outskirts of...
LONGNAN, China
Marks made by an excavator is pictured at the old site of a rare earth metals mine on the outskirts of...
Marks made by an excavator is pictured at the old site of a rare earth metals mine on the outskirts of Longnan county, in Jiangxi Province October 27, 2010. The near monopoly China has in producing 97 percent of the world's supply of rare earths has been well-known among industrial users for years, but came under the international spotlight after reports Beijing halted shipments to Japan over a territorial dispute with Tokyo last month. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AOC
August 31, 2009
Lab technician Shirley Robinson measures out samples of the different rare earth oxides for quality assurance...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Lab technician Shirley Robinson measures out samples of the different rare earth oxides for quality assurance testing at the Molycorp Minerals laboratory at the Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California August 19, 2009. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AOB
August 31, 2009
Samples of the different rare earth elements are measured before quality assurance testing at the Molycorp...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Samples of the different rare earth elements are measured before quality assurance testing at the Molycorp Minerals laboratory at the Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California in this August 19, 2009 photo. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AOA
August 31, 2009
Lab technician Shirley Robinson checks on her fluxer machines, which takes rare earth oxides and converts...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Lab technician Shirley Robinson checks on her fluxer machines, which takes rare earth oxides and converts them to glass discs, (R) during quality assurance testing procedures at the Molycorp Minerals laboratory at the Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California on August 19, 2009. The open pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO9
August 31, 2009
Ground water pumped from the bottom of the Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine is atomized August 19,...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
Ground water pumped from the bottom of the Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine at the Mountain Pass...
Ground water pumped from the bottom of the Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine is atomized August 19, 2009 in mountain Pass, California. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO8
August 31, 2009
Rick Pacheco, precipitation operator at Molycorp Minerals in Mountain Pass, Calif. transfers the didymium...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Rick Pacheco, precipitation operator at Molycorp Minerals in Mountain Pass, Calif. transfers the didymium from holding tanks to the finishing room during the production of the rare earth elements at the Mountain Pass Mine on August 19, 2009. The open pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO7
August 31, 2009
Didymium oxide, a combination of neodymium and praseodymium, two rare earth elements is shown at at Molycorp...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Didymium oxide, a combination of neodymium and praseodymium, two rare earth elements is shown at at Molycorp Mineral's Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California August 19, 2009. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO6
August 31, 2009
A truck (L) makes it way up the side of Molycorp Minerals open pit Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass,...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
A truck (L) makes it way up the side of Molycorp Minerals open pit Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California in this August 19, 2009 photo. The mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO5
August 31, 2009
Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine sits along Interstate 15 in Mountain Pass, Califonia in this August...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine sits along Interstate 15 in Mountain Pass, Califonia in this August 19, 2009 photo. The open-pit mine at Mountain Pass, California, is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO4
August 31, 2009
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
Lanthanum, a rare earth element, is loaded for processing at the Mountain...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
Lanthanum, a rare earth element, is loaded for processing at the Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California in this August 19 2009 photo. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27AO1
August 31, 2009
Rich Sixberry, operations general foreman at Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain pass, California,...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
Rich Sixberry, operations general foreman at Molycorp Minerals Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain pass, California, looks over sacks of didymium oxide, a combination of two rare earth elements, in this August 19 2009 photo. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTAREUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27ANY
August 31, 2009
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
Brock O'Kelly, assistant general manager with Molycorp Minerals, surveys...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
Brock O'Kelly, assistant general manager with Molycorp Minerals, surveys the property around the Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California in this August 19 2009 photo. The open-pit mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
ENVIRONMENT-MINING/
RTR27ANX
August 31, 2009
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
A truck (L) makes it way up the side of Molycorp Minerals open pit Mountain...
Mountain Pass, UNITED STATES
To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA
FTR MOVING MONDAY AUGUST 31
A truck (L) makes it way up the side of Molycorp Minerals open pit Mountain Pass Mine in Mountain Pass, California on in this August 19 2009 photo. The mine is home to the world's richest proven reserve of "rare earth" metals, a family of minerals vital to producing the powerful, lightweight magnets used in the engines of Toyota Motor Corp's Prius and generators in wind turbines. The same kind of magnets power the fins that steer precision-guided missiles. To match feature ENVIRONMENT-MINING/TOYOTA REUTERS/David Becker (UNITED STATES)
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