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Search results for: sedentary lifestyles

COSTARICA/
RTR34T39
July 10, 2012
Women take part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Women take part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
Women take part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T34
July 10, 2012
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T32
July 10, 2012
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T2U
July 10, 2012
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T2R
July 10, 2012
A woman takes part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A woman takes part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
A woman takes part in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T2P
July 10, 2012
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T2M
July 10, 2012
A child waits in his pram while his mother participates in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A child waits in his pram while his mother participates in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports...
A child waits in his pram while his mother participates in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participate in aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR34T2B
July 10, 2012
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago
People participate in an aerobics class at the gymnasium of a sports center in Cartago, east of San Jose July 10, 2012. More than 300 people participated in an aerobics program organized by a local committee, with the objective of reducing heart disease, obesity and sedentary lifestyle of the population of Cartago, according to program director Ivonne Martinez. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FT5
May 01, 2012
Medical personnel are reflected in an x-ray viewbox as they walk down a corridor in the radiotherapy...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Medical personnel are reflected in an x-ray viewbox as they walk down a corridor in the radiotherapy department of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FT4
May 01, 2012
Clinical oncologists Dr. Joel Yarney (R) and Dr. Clement Edusa look at a scan of a cancer patient on...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Clinical oncologists Dr. Joel Yarney (R) and Dr. Clement Edusa look at a scan of a cancer patient on a computer screen at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSW
May 01, 2012
Radiotherapist Kofi Kyei, 30, points at a tumour on an x-ray from a patient suffering from bladder cancer...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Radiotherapist Kofi Kyei, 30, points at a tumour on an x-ray from a patient suffering from bladder cancer at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSU
May 01, 2012
Radiotherapist Enock Okine operates a radiotherapy simulator at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Radiotherapist Enock Okine operates a radiotherapy simulator at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FST
May 01, 2012
Cancer patients sit in a chemotherapy ward while receiving treatment at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Cancer patients sit in a chemotherapy ward while receiving treatment at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSO
May 01, 2012
Radiotherapist Enock Okine operates a radiotherapy simulator at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Radiotherapist Enock Okine operates a radiotherapy simulator at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSL
May 01, 2012
Retired cocoa farmer Emanuel Adu, 73, who is receiving treatment for a facial melanoma, sits during a...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Retired cocoa farmer Emanuel Adu, 73, who is receiving treatment for a facial melanoma, sits during a consultation at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth.
Yet Adu's is one of an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSI
May 01, 2012
Cancer patients sit in a chemotherapy ward while receiving treatment at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Cancer patients sit in a chemotherapy ward while receiving treatment at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSH
May 01, 2012
A 52-year-old woman suffering from bladder cancer lies under a radiotherapy simulator used to pinpoint...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
A 52-year-old woman suffering from bladder cancer lies under a radiotherapy simulator used to pinpoint areas to treat at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth.
Yet there are an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
RTR31FSE
May 01, 2012
Verna Vanderpuye (R), a clinical oncologist and radiotherapy consultant, speaks with retired cocoa farmer...
Accra, Ghana
To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA
Verna Vanderpuye (R), a clinical oncologist and radiotherapy consultant, speaks with retired cocoa farmer Emanuel Adu, 73, who is receiving treatment for a facial melanoma, during a consultation at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra April 24, 2012. Most of Africa's around 2,000 languages have no word for cancer. The common perception in both developing and developed countries is that it's a disease of the wealthy world, where high-fat, processed-food diets, alcohol, smoking and sedentary lifestyles fuel tumour growth. Yet Adu's is one of an estimated one million new cancer cases sub-Saharan Africa will see this year - a number predicted to double to 2 million a year in the next decade. Picture taken April 24, 2012. To match Insight CANCER-AFRICA/GHANA REUTERS/Olivier Asselin (GHANA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/
RTR25FL5
July 08, 2009
A man inspects organic bananas from central Taiwan which are five times more expensive than regular bananas...
Taipei, Taiwan
To match feature HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/
A man inspects organic bananas from central Taiwan which are five times more expensive than regular bananas at an organic food chain store in Taipei June 30, 2009. Affluence and sedentary lifestyles have brought health problems such as obesity and diabetes to Asia, prompting locals to fill up their shopping carts with products such as oats, yoghurt and vitamins. Picture taken June 30, 2009. To match feature HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/ REUTERS/Pichi Chuang (TAIWAN SOCIETY HEALTH)
HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/
RTR25FL2
July 08, 2009
A customer walks past organic products in an organic food chain store in Taipei June 30, 2009. Affluence...
Taipei, Taiwan
To match feature HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/
A customer walks past organic products in an organic food chain store in Taipei June 30, 2009. Affluence and sedentary lifestyles have brought health problems such as obesity and diabetes to Asia, prompting locals to fill up their shopping carts with products such as oats, yoghurt and vitamins. Picture taken June 30, 2009. To match feature HEALTHFOOD-ASIA/ REUTERS/Pichi Chuang (TAIWAN SOCIETY HEALTH)
USA
RTXKN77
July 24, 2001
Dr. Mark Butterbrodt (R), a white doctor on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and speaks...
Porcupine, USA
Dr. Mark Butterbrodt (R), a white doctor on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and sp.....
Dr. Mark Butterbrodt (R), a white doctor on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and speaks the Lakota language, checks a young Native American boy at the Porcupine Clinic. Butterbrodt says regarding an ongoing report thats states more than 50 percent of Native Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic, the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent supply of food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive into a deadly negative. "Sadly, a lot of our children and teenagers are not very physically active," says Dr. Butterbrodt. He knows many parents who sequester their children indoors fearing gangs, stray dogs and the broken glass that litters the Great Plains reservation. "It's no coincidence that in Arizona, diabetes is known as the television disease". Photo Taken June 26, 2001.
USA
RTXKN76
July 24, 2001
A lone vehicle travels one of the many monotonous roads on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South...
Porcupine, USA
A lone vehicle travels one of the many monotonous roads on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in Sout.....
A lone vehicle travels one of the many monotonous roads on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Many residents have to travel the long distances to endure hours of dialysis every week a routine that is becoming necessary for an increasing number of Native Americans across the rural United States. A ongoing report by the Strong Heart Study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, says that more than 50 percent of Native Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic. Researchers believe there is a very big genetic component, and it was an advantage many years ago. In the days of feast or famine Native Americans could consume large quantities of food in one sitting and their efficient bodies stored it for the lean times. Today the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent supply of food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive into a deadly negative. Photo taken June 24, 2001.
USA
RTXKN75
July 24, 2001
An Oglala Lakota warrior is silhouetted against the late afternoon sky during a three-day PowWow on the...
Porcupine, USA
An Oglala Lakota warrior is silhouetted against the late afternoon sky during a three-day PowWow on .....
An Oglala Lakota warrior is silhouetted against the late afternoon sky during a three-day PowWow on the Pine Ridge Indian Resveration in South Dakota. A ongoing report by the Strong Heart Study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, says that more than 50 percent of Native Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic. Researchers believe there is a very big genetic component, and it was an advantage many years ago. In the days of feast or famine Native Americans could consume large quantities of food in one sitting and their efficient bodies stored it for the lean times. Today the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent supply of food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive into a deadly negative. Photo taken June 24, 2001.
FEATURE HEALTH NATIVES
RTRL25Q
July 24, 2001
Dr. Mark Butterbrodt (R), a white doctor on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation in South Dakota and speaks...
Porcupine, United States of America
FOR FEATURE STORY HEALTH NATIVES.
Dr. Mark Butterbrodt (R), a white doctor on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation in South Dakota and speaks the Lakota language, checks a
young Native American boy at the Porcupine Clinic. Butterbrodt says
regarding an ongoing report thats states more than 50 percent of Native
Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic, the sedentary reservation
lifestyle combined with a consistent supply of food that's high in
sugar has turned what was once a positive into a deadly negative.
"Sadly, a lot of our children and teenagers are not very physically
active," says Dr. Butterbrodt. He knows many parents who sequester
their children indoors fearing gangs, stray dogs and the broken glass
that litters the Great Plains reservation. "It's no coincidence that in
Arizona, diabetes is known as the television disease". Photo Taken June
26, 2001.

AC
FEATURE HEALTH NATIVES
RTRL26Y
June 25, 2001
Norm Underbaggage sits in the Porcupine Clinic on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation in South Dakota....
Porcupine, United States of America
FOR FEATURE STORY HEALTH NATIVES.
Norm Underbaggage sits in the Porcupine Clinic on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation in South Dakota. Underbaggage a Oglala Lakota, is forced to
endure a monotonous routine of dialysis three times a week, and one
that is becoming necessary for an increasing number of Native Americans
across the rural United States. A ongoing report by the Strong Heart
Study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, says that more
than 50 percent of Native Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic.
Researchers believe there is a very big genetic component, and it was
an advantage many years ago. In the days of feast or famine Native
Americans could consume large quantities of food in one sitting and
their efficient bodies stored it for the lean times. Today the
sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent supply of
food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive into a
deadly negative. Phot taken June 25, 2001.

AC
FEATURE HEALTH NATIVES
RTRL268
June 24, 2001
A member of the Oglala Lakota tribe prepares to eat an ice cream float
during a three-day PowWow on...
Kyle, United States of America
FOR FEATURE STORY HEALTH NATIVES.
A member of the Oglala Lakota tribe prepares to eat an ice cream float
during a three-day PowWow on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservaration in
South Dakota. An ongoing report funded by the U.S. National Institutes
of Health, says that more than 50 percent of Native Americans over the
age of 45 are diabetic. Researchers believe there is a very big genetic
component, and it was an advantage many years ago. In the days of feast
or famine Native Americans could consume large quantities of food in
one sitting and their efficient bodies stored it for the lean times.
Today the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent
supply of food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive
into a deadly negative. Photo taken June 24, 2001.

AC
FEATURE HEALTH NATIVES
RTRL25Y
June 24, 2001
A lone vehicle travels one of the many monotonous roads on the Pine Ridge
Indian Reservation in South...
Porcupine, United States of America
FOR FEATURE STORY HEALTH NATIVES.
A lone vehicle travels one of the many monotonous roads on the Pine Ridge
Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Many residents have to travel the long
distances to endure hours of dialysis every week a routine that is becoming
necessary for an increasing number of Native Americans across the rural
United States. A ongoing report by the Strong Heart Study, funded by the
U.S. National Institutes of Health, says that more than 50 percent of Native
Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic. Researchers believe there is a
very big genetic component, and it was an advantage many years ago. In the
days of feast or famine Native Americans could consume large quantities of
food in one sitting and their efficient bodies stored it for the lean times.
Today the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined with a consistent supply
of food that's high in sugar has turned what was once a positive into a
deadly negative. Photo taken June 24, 2001. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/ANDY CLARK

AC
FEATURE HEALTH NATIVES
RTRJYHX
June 24, 2001
An Oglala Lakota warrior is silhouetted against the late afternoon sky
during a three-day PowWow on...
Kyle, United States of America
FOR FEATURE STORY HEALTH NATIVES.
An Oglala Lakota warrior is silhouetted against the late afternoon sky
during a three-day PowWow on the Pine Ridge Indian Resveration in South
Dakota. A ongoing report by the Strong Heart Study, funded by the U.S.
National Institutes of Health, says that more than 50 percent of Native
Americans over the age of 45 are diabetic. Researchers believe there is
a very big genetic component, and it was an advantage many years ago.
In the days of feast or famine Native Americans could consume large
quantities of food in one sitting and their efficient bodies stored it
for the lean times. Today the sedentary reservation lifestyle combined
with a consistent supply of food that's high in sugar has turned what
was once a positive into a deadly negative.June 24, 2001. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE
REUTERS/ANDY CLARK

AC
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