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Search results for: Arctic polar bear

Pictures Report
Pictures Report
Exhausted polar bear rescued after wandering into Siberian city
11 PICTURES
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6MJ9P
February 13, 2019
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia February 13, 2019. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6MJ9O
February 13, 2019
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia February 13, 2019. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6MJ9N
February 13, 2019
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia February 13, 2019. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6MJ8E
February 13, 2019
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk
Ursula, a one-year-old female polar bear which was found stray in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, plays in a cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia February 13, 2019. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6IER4
December 13, 2018
Polar bears Felix (L) and Aurora eat fish and vegetables, attached to a Christmas tree, during an entertainment...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Polar bears Felix and Aurora eat fish and vegetables during an entertainment event in Krasnoyarsk
Polar bears Felix (L) and Aurora eat fish and vegetables, attached to a Christmas tree, during an entertainment event, marking the upcoming holidays and the beginning of the Polar Night in the Arctic region, at the Royev Ruchey Zoo on the suburbs of Krasnoyarsk, Russia December 13, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6IER2
December 13, 2018
Zoo keepers, dressed in fancy costumes, decorate a Christmas tree with fish and vegetables for polar...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Zoo keepers decorate a Christmas tree with fish and vegetables for polar bears Felix and Aurora during...
Zoo keepers, dressed in fancy costumes, decorate a Christmas tree with fish and vegetables for polar bears Felix and Aurora during an entertainment event, marking the upcoming holidays and the beginning of the Polar Night in the Arctic region, at the Royev Ruchey Zoo on the suburbs of Krasnoyarsk, Russia December 13, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6FOP6
October 19, 2018
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
A polar bear cub bites a rope at a zoo in Krasnoyarsk
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, bites a rope inside an adaptation cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 19, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6FOOX
October 19, 2018
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
A polar bear cub eats meat at a zoo in Krasnoyarsk
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, eats meat inside an adaptation cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 19, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6FOOQ
October 19, 2018
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
A polar bear cub plays with a ball at a zoo in Krasnoyarsk
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, plays with a ball inside an adaptation cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 19, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTX6FOOO
October 19, 2018
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
A polar bear cub looks out of a cage at a zoo in Krasnoyarsk
A polar bear cub, which is about 10 months old and was recently found in the Arctic settlement of Dikson on the Taymyr Peninsula, looks out of an adaptation cage at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 19, 2018. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
WILDLIFE-POLARBEARS/ARCTIC
RTSPUEW
September 28, 2016
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town...
Longyearbyen, Norway
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town...
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town on Spitsbergen Island, Norway, September 19, 2016. Picture taken September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Gwladys Fouche
WILDFLIFE-POLARBEARS/ARCTIC
RTSPU8L
September 28, 2016
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town...
Longyearbyen, Norway
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town...
A stuffed polar bear is on display in the arrival hall of the airport of Longyearbyen, the main town on Spitsbergen Island, Norway, September 19, 2016. Picture taken September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Gwladys Fouche
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTSCO26
March 29, 2016
A couple of polar bears, Felix (L), a nine-year-old, and Aurora, a six-year-old, walk inside its enclosure...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Couple of polar bears walk inside its enclosure at Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk
A couple of polar bears, Felix (L), a nine-year-old, and Aurora, a six-year-old, walk inside its enclosure at the Royev Ruchey Zoo in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia, March 29, 2016. Zoo keepers have allowed the bears to live together hoping that they will mate. Both bears were rescued by people in the Arctic Ocean, and were brought to the Krasnoyarsk zoo. A weak orphaned cub, Felix was delivered to the zoo from a scientific polar station on the Wrangel Island in May 2006. Aurora and her sister, Victoria, were found without their mother along a coast of Russia's Taymyr Peninsula in May 2010, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The Wider Image
The Wider Image
Research in the Arctic
18 PICTURES
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX7
January 28, 2016
Radar antennas at the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT) facility on Breinosa,...
BREINOSA, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Radar antennas at the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT) facility on Breinosa, Svalbard, Norway October 24, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 02 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX4
January 28, 2016
A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna Filipova ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "RESEARCH IN THE ARCTIC" SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL 19 IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX3
January 28, 2016
Breinosa is seen from the research Zeppelin Observatory that is operated by operated by the Norwegian...
BREINOSA, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Breinosa is seen from the research Zeppelin Observatory that is operated by operated by the Norwegian Polar Institute and Norwegian Institute for Air Research in Svalbard in Norway October 17, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna Filipova TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 01 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX2
January 28, 2016
Snow is seen on the research centre, formerly a coal mining town, in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Snow is seen on the research centre, formerly a coal mining town, in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 13, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 04 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES


ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX1
January 28, 2016
The old radio station for the mining town which is now a telegraph museum in Ny-Alesund Svalbard, Norway,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
The old radio station for the mining town which is now a telegraph museum in Ny-Alesund Svalbard, Norway, October 13, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 06 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES


ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CX0
January 28, 2016
Dawn at the scientific base of Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 14, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Dawn at the scientific base of Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 14, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 03 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWZ
January 28, 2016
Snow is seen on the Ny-Alesund research centre, that was formerly a coal mining town October 19, 2015....
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Snow is seen on the Ny-Alesund research centre, that was formerly a coal mining town October 19, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 08 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWN
January 28, 2016
A weather station is seen in Ny Alesund, one of the most northerly settlements in the world, a base for...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
A weather station is seen in Ny Alesund, one of the most northerly settlements in the world, a base for international scientists, Svalbard October 17, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 07 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWM
January 28, 2016
The northernmost non-military post office in the world in the Kings Bay research station in Ny-Alesund,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
The northernmost non-military post office in the world in the Kings Bay research station in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 18, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 10 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES


ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWK
January 28, 2016
Dogs, some that are family pets and others that are used for dog sledges, are seen waiting in their yard...
LONGYERBYEAN, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Dogs, some that are family pets and others that are used for dog sledges, are seen waiting in their yard outside the settlement in Longyerbyean, Svalbard, Norway, October 22, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 11 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWJ
January 28, 2016
A scupted bust of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen is seen at the scientific base of Ny Alesund, in...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
A scupted bust of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen is seen at the scientific base of Ny Alesund, in Norway, October 18, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 09 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWE
January 28, 2016
Radar dish and antennas systems are seen at the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association facility...
BREINOSA, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Radar dish and antennas systems are seen at the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association facility on Breinosa, Svalbard, in Norway, October 24, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna Filipova TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 13 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWD
January 28, 2016
An old locomotive train that was used for transporting coal is preserved as a monument at Ny-Alesund,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
An old locomotive train that was used for transporting coal is preserved as a monument at Ny-Alesund, in Svalbard, Norway, October 13, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna Filipova
PICTURE 12 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CWC
January 28, 2016
Warehouses and the old part of the Ny-Alesund, Norway settlement from the coal mining period which closed...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Warehouses and the old part of the Ny-Alesund, Norway settlement from the coal mining period which closed in 1963, are seen October 11, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 15 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CW9
January 28, 2016
An overview of the residential and research settlement areas for scientists at the Kings Bay in Ny-Alesund,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
An overview of the residential and research settlement areas for scientists at the Kings Bay in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 15, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 17 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES


ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CW8
January 28, 2016
An old locomotive train that was used for transporting coal is preserved as a monument at Ny-Alesund,...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
An old locomotive train that was used for transporting coal is preserved as a monument at Ny-Alesund, in Svalbard, Norway, October 11, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna Filipova
PICTURE 14 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES
ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CW7
January 28, 2016
Dinghies and research vessels are pictured in the small harbour near Ny-Alesund on Spitsbergen, Norway...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Dinghies and research vessels are pictured in the small harbour near Ny-Alesund on Spitsbergen, Norway October 15, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 16 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CVT
January 28, 2016
Snow covers Broggerdalen mountain near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 11, 2015. A Norwegian chain...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Snow covers Broggerdalen mountain near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 11, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 18 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

ARCTIC-STATION/
RTX24CVQ
January 28, 2016
Low clouds are seen in the Kings Bay of Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 12, 2015. A Norwegian chain...
NY-ALESUND, Norway
The Wider Image: Research in the Arctic
Low clouds are seen in the Kings Bay of Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 12, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world's most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea region in 2014. REUTERS/Anna FilipovaPICTURE 19 OF 19 - SEARCH "SVALBARD FILIPOVA" FOR ALL IMAGES

SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28H1
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental gathering, as Greenpeace Executive Director John Sauven listens outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28GZ
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she helps to pull a robot...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face during an environmental gathering...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she helps to pull a robot polar bear, during an environmental gathering outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28GW
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she stands in front of a...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face during an environmental gathering...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she stands in front of a robot polar bear, during an environmental gathering outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28F6
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she holds an 'environmental...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face during an environmental gathering...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she holds an 'environmental wish' during an environmental gathering outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28E3
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she speaks during an environmental gathering, as Greenpeace Executive Director John Sauven listens outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTS28C3
September 29, 2015
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she listens to speakers during...
London, United Kingdom
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she listens to speakers during...
British actress Emma Thompson wears a painted polar bear paw on her face as she listens to speakers during an environmental gathering outside the Shell Centre in central London, Britain September 29, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude, a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTX1SURO
September 28, 2015
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell...
London, United Kingdom
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell...
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell Building by Greenpeace campaigners in London, Britain September 28, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude in a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTX1SURN
September 28, 2015
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell...
London, United Kingdom
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell...
Pedestrians stop to look at a robot polar bear built using animatronics as it is parked outside the Shell Building by Greenpeace campaigners in London, Britain September 28, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude in a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTX1SURM
September 28, 2015
A worker guides a car to an alternate car parking area near a robot polar bear built using animatronics...
London, United Kingdom
A worker guides a car to an alternate car parking area near a robot polar bear built using animatronics...
A worker guides a car to an alternate car parking area near a robot polar bear built using animatronics which is parked outside the Shell Building by Greenpeace campaigners in London, Britain September 28, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude in a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
SHELL-ALASKA/
RTX1SURH
September 28, 2015
A pedestrian walks past a robot polar bear built using animatronics, which is parked outside the Shell...
London, United Kingdom
A pedestrian walks past a robot polar bear built using animatronics, which is parked outside the Shell...
A pedestrian walks past a robot polar bear built using animatronics, which is parked outside the Shell Building by Greenpeace campaigners in London, Britain September 28, 2015. Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its Arctic search for oil after failing to find enough crude in a move that will appease environmental campaigners and shareholders who said its project was too expensive and risky. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTR4UD8W
March 22, 2015
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time after winter at the Royev Ruchey...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time after winter at the Royev Ruchey...
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time after winter at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk March 22, 2015. Felix was delivered to the zoo as a weak, orphaned cub from a scientific polar station on the Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean in May 2006, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTR4UD8K
March 22, 2015
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, shakes off water after swimming in a pool for the first time after...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, shakes off water after swimming in a pool for the first time after...
Felix, a 9-year-old male polar bear, shakes off water after swimming in a pool for the first time after winter at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk March 22, 2015. Felix was delivered to the zoo as a weak, orphaned cub from a scientific polar station on the Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean in May 2006, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CLIMATECHANGE-LIMA
RTR4GR0T
December 04, 2014
Security stand near a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic...
Lima, Peru
Security stand near a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic...
Security stand near a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic Methane Emergency Group at the venue of the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP 20 in Lima December 4, 2014. The two-week long United Nations climate summit opened on December 1 in Lima, with experts and analysts from around the world gathering to discuss melting glaciers and extreme weather patterns. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
CLIMATECHANGE-LIMA
RTR4GR09
December 04, 2014
A man walks past a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic Methane...
Lima, Peru
A man walks past a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic Methane...
A man walks past a teddy polar bear displayed to bring attention to a news conference by the Arctic Methane Emergency Group at the venue of the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP 20 in Lima December 4, 2014. The two-week long United Nations climate summit opened on December 1 in Lima, with experts and analysts from around the world gathering to discuss melting glaciers and extreme weather patterns. REUTERS/ Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
CZECH-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR49Y49
October 13, 2014
Street performers look at Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October...
Prague, Czech Republic
Street performers look at Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague
Street performers look at Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13, 2014. The event is part of a campaign to raise awareness about the threats to the Arctic and to advocate a ban on drilling for oil. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
CZECH-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR49Y3N
October 13, 2014
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13,...
Prague, Czech Republic
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13, 2014. The event is part of a campaign to raise awareness about the threats to the Arctic and to advocate a ban on drilling for oil. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
CZECH-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR49Y3J
October 13, 2014
People stroke Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13, 2014....
Prague, Czech Republic
People stroke Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague
People stroke Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13, 2014. The event is part of a campaign to raise awareness about the threats to the Arctic and to advocate a ban on drilling for oil. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
CZECH-ENVIRONMENT/
RTR49Y2Z
October 13, 2014
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13,...
Prague, Czech Republic
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague
A woman walks past Greenpeace environmental activists dressed up as a polar bear in Prague October 13, 2014. The event is part of a campaign to raise awareness about the threats to the Arctic and to advocate a ban on drilling for oil. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
USA-SCIENCE/IGNOBELPRIZES
RTR46TXN
September 19, 2014
Eigil Reimers (2nd L) and Sindre Eftestol (3rd L) of Norway accept the Ig Nobel prize for Arctic Science...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Reimers and Eftestol of Norway accept the Ig Nobel prize for Arctic Science at the 24th First Annual...
Eigil Reimers (2nd L) and Sindre Eftestol (3rd L) of Norway accept the Ig Nobel prize for Arctic Science for "testing how reindeer react to seeing humans who are disguised as polar bears" at the 24th First Annual Ig Nobel Prizes awards ceremony at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts September 18, 2014. The annual prizes, meant to entertain and encourage global research and innovation, are awarded by the Annals of Improbable Research as a whimsical counterpoint to the Nobel Prizes which will be announced next month. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION SOCIETY)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JXXO
April 04, 2014
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, walks near a swimming pool for the first time in the season,...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, walks near a swimming pool for the first time in the season...
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, walks near a swimming pool for the first time in the season, with the air temperature at about 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 4, 2014. Two female polar bear cubs, Aurora and Victoria, were found without their mother in Russia's Taymyr Peninsula on the Arctic Ocean coast in May 2010 and were later brought to the zoo in Krasnoyarsk, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JXX5
April 04, 2014
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, plays with a canister near a swimming pool for the first time...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, plays with a canister near a swimming pool for the first time...
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, plays with a canister near a swimming pool for the first time in the season, with the air temperature at about 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 4, 2014. Two female polar bear cubs, Aurora and Victoria, were found without their mother in Russia's Taymyr Peninsula on the Arctic Ocean coast in May 2010 and were later brought to the zoo in Krasnoyarsk, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JXWZ
April 04, 2014
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, jumps into a pool for the first time in the season, with the...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, jumps into a pool for the first time in the season at the...
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, jumps into a pool for the first time in the season, with the air temperature at about 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 4, 2014. Two female polar bear cubs, Aurora and Victoria, were found without their mother in Russia's Taymyr Peninsula on the Arctic Ocean coast in May 2010 and were later brought to the zoo in Krasnoyarsk, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JXWB
April 04, 2014
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time in the season, with the...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time in the season at the Royev...
Aurora, a four-year-old female polar bear, swims in a pool for the first time in the season, with the air temperature at about 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 4, 2014. Two female polar bear cubs, Aurora and Victoria, were found without their mother in Russia's Taymyr Peninsula on the Arctic Ocean coast in May 2010 and were later brought to the zoo in Krasnoyarsk, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JXSQ
April 04, 2014
Felix, an eight-year-old male polar bear, shakes water off after swimming in a pool for the first time...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Felix, an eight-year-old male polar bear, shakes water after off swimming in a pool for the first time...
Felix, an eight-year-old male polar bear, shakes water off after swimming in a pool for the first time in the season, with the air temperature at about 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), at the Royev Ruchey zoo in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 4, 2014. A weak orphaned cub Felix was delivered to the zoo from a scientific polar station on the Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean in May 2006, according to zoo representatives. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
USA-WEATHER/
RTX174FQ
January 06, 2014
The Chicago skyline is seen beyond the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois,...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Chicago skyline is seen beyond the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago
The Chicago skyline is seen beyond the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois, January 6, 2014. A blast of Arctic air gripped the mid-section of the United States on Monday, bringing the coldest temperatures in two decades, forcing businesses and schools to close and causing widespread airline delays and hazardous driving conditions. Meteorologists said temperatures were dangerously cold and life-threatening in some places, with 0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 18 Celsius) recorded in Chicago, St. Louis and Indianapolis. The chill was set to bear down on eastern and southern states as the day wore on. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CITYSCAPE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-WEATHER/
RTX1746N
January 06, 2014
A man is silhouetted against the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois January...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
A man is silhouetted against the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago
A man is silhouetted against the arctic sea smoke rising off Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois January 6, 2014. A blast of Arctic air gripped the mid-section of the United States on Monday, bringing the coldest temperatures in two decades. Meteorologists said temperatures were dangerously cold and life-threatening in some places, with 0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 18 Celsius) recorded in Chicago, St. Louis and Indianapolis. The chill was set to bear down on eastern and southern states as the day wore on. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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