Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Bird in Hand

USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42POC
August 17, 2014
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO2
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO1
August 17, 2014
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvaniaty
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNW
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNU
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNT
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA EDUCATION TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNS
August 17, 2014
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: FOOD RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNM
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNL
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNH
August 17, 2014
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION TRAVEL AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN9
August 17, 2014
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT RELIGION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN8
August 17, 2014
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMY
August 17, 2014
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT EDUCATION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMX
August 17, 2014
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMR
August 17, 2014
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT AGRICULTURE TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMM
August 17, 2014
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media presentation at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ANIMALS AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMD
August 17, 2014
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY)
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1