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Search results for: Bruno Kelly

BRAZIL/
RTXRS2U 
December 12, 2009 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal... 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal settlement, near Manaus December 11, 2009. Brazil's efforts to protect the Amazon are under the global spotlight this month as heads of state meet at the climate conference in Copenhagen. Picture taken December 11, 2009. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly-Amazonaspress (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTXRS2X 
December 12, 2009 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal... 
A seedling pokes through the ground in an area of the Amazon jungle that was deforested for an illegal settlement, near Manaus December 11, 2009. Brazil's efforts to protect the Amazon are under the global spotlight this month as heads of state meet at the climate conference in Copenhagen. Picture taken December 11, 2009. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly/Amazonaspress (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR2KJ4Y 
March 28, 2011 
Canadian film director James Cameron listens as leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous tribe... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Canadian film director James Cameron listens as leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous tribe... 
Canadian film director James Cameron listens as leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous tribe speaks about the construction of the Belo Monte dam along the Xingu River, during the Global Sustainability Forum in Manaus, March 25, 2011. The second edition of the forum brought together political, business and environmental leaders to discuss the sustainability of the Amazon, according to the organization's website. Picture taken March 25, 2011. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly-A Critica (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR2KJ4Z 
March 28, 2011 
Canadian film director James Cameron shakes hands with leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Canadian film director James Cameron shakes hands with leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous... 
Canadian film director James Cameron shakes hands with leader Raoni Txucarramae of the Kaiapo indigenous tribe after he spoke about the construction of the Belo Monte dam along the Xingu River, during the Global Sustainability Forum in Manaus, March 25, 2011. The second edition of the forum brought together political, business and environmental leaders to discuss the sustainability of the Amazon, according to the organization's website. Picture taken March 25, 2011. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly-A Critica (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR2KJ50 
March 28, 2011 
Sir Richard Branson poses with Amazon natives and organizers of the Global Sustainability Forum, after... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Sir Richard Branson poses with Amazon natives and organizers of the Global Sustainability Forum in Manaus... 
Sir Richard Branson poses with Amazon natives and organizers of the Global Sustainability Forum, after he spoke about the "Strategies for the Decarbonization of the Economy," in Manaus March 25, 2011. The second edition of the forum brought together political, business and environmental leaders to discuss the sustainability of the Amazon, according to the organization's website. Picture taken March 25, 2011. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly-A Critica (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRH8 
March 03, 2012 
Ongoing construction work is seen at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is set to be one of the host... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Ongoing construction work is seen at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is set to be one of the host... 
Ongoing construction work is seen at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is set to be one of the host stadiums for the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRH9 
March 03, 2012 
Pedestrians walk past a temporary wall put up to obscure the ongoing construction work at the Arena da... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Pedestrians walk past a temporary wall put up to obscure the ongoing construction work at the Arena da... 
Pedestrians walk past a temporary wall put up to obscure the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is set to be one of the host stadiums for the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRHB 
March 03, 2012 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the... 
Manaus, Brazil 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium is seen in Manaus 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums of the 2014 World Cup, is seen in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRHN 
March 03, 2012 
Ongoing construction work is seen being carried out at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Aerial view of ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium in Manaus 
Ongoing construction work is seen being carried out at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums for the 2014 World Cup, in this aerial view taken in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRHP 
March 03, 2012 
A man jogs past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Man jogs past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium... 
A man jogs past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums for the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRIJ 
March 03, 2012 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the... 
Manaus, Brazil 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium is seen in Manaus 
An aerial view of the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums of the 2014 World Cup, is seen in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION) 
SOCCER-FIFA/BOARD-VALCKE
RTR2YRIL 
March 03, 2012 
A man walks past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man walks past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia... 
A man walks past a temporary wall surrounding the ongoing construction work at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus March 2, 2012. FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke made a scathing attack on Brazil's preparations for the 2014 World Cup on Friday, saying "not a lot is moving" and organisers needed "a kick up the backside". Valcke, who has continually raised concerns about the tournament, said time was running out and there was no "Plan B" in place. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP) 
SOCCER-WORLD/BRAZIL
RTR2YSQJ 
March 03, 2012 
Ongoing construction work is seen being carried out at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Ongoing construction work is seen being carried out at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium in Manaus 
Ongoing construction work is seen being carried out at the Arena da Amazonia Stadium, which is one of the host stadiums for the 2014 World Cup, in this aerial view taken in Manaus March 2, 2012. Brazil has ruled out dealing with FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke after he said the country needed a "kick up the backside" to be ready in time to host the 2014 World Cup. Sports Minister Rebelo told a news conference on Saturday that Valcke's words a day earlier were "offensive" and "unacceptable". Picture taken March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP) 
SOCCER-WORLD-BRAZIL/FIFA
RTR2Z4HE 
March 10, 2012 
Workers take a break before their shift building the new Arena da Amazonia Stadium, one of the hosts... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Workers take a break before their shift building the new Arena da Amazonia Stadium, one of the hosts... 
Workers take a break before their shift building the new Arena da Amazonia Stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus, the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, March 9, 2012. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will meet Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff to clear the air after FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke's remarks about the country's slow progress in preparing for the 2014 World Cup caused an uproar. Valcke was due to visit South America next week but his tour of construction sites in some World Cup host cities has been put back until Blatter and Rousseff have met, a FIFA statement added. Picture taken March 9. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION TRAVEL WORLD CUP) 
SOCCER-WORLD-BRAZIL/FIFA
RTR2Z4TU 
March 10, 2012 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus, the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, March 9, 2012. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will meet Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff to clear the air after FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke's remarks about the country's slow progress in preparing for the 2014 World Cup caused an uproar. Valcke was due to visit South America next week but his tour of construction sites in some World Cup host cities has been put back until Blatter and Rousseff have met, a FIFA statement added. Picture taken March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION WORLD CUP TRAVEL) 
SOCCER-WORLD-BRAZIL/FIFA
RTR2Z4U0 
March 10, 2012 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus, the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, March 9, 2012. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will meet Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff to clear the air after FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke's remarks about the country's slow progress in preparing for the 2014 World Cup caused an uproar. Valcke was due to visit South America next week but his tour of construction sites in some World Cup host cities has been put back until Blatter and Rousseff have met, a FIFA statement added. Picture taken March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION WORLD CUP TRAVEL) 
SOCCER-WORLD-BRAZIL/FIFA
RTR2Z4U5 
March 10, 2012 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus, the heart of the Brazilian Amazon March 9, 2012. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will meet Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff to clear the air after FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke's remarks about the country's slow progress in preparing for the 2014 World Cup caused an uproar. Valcke was due to visit South America next week but his tour of construction sites in some World Cup host cities has been put back until Blatter and Rousseff have met, a FIFA statement added. Picture taken March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION WORLD CUP) 
SOCCER-WORLD-BRAZIL/FIFA
RTR2Z4U8 
March 10, 2012 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup,... 
Labourers work on the site of the new Arena da Amazonia stadium, one of the hosts of the 2014 World Cup, in Manaus, the heart of the Brazilian Amazon March 9, 2012. FIFA president Sepp Blatter will meet Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff to clear the air after FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke's remarks about the country's slow progress in preparing for the 2014 World Cup caused an uproar. Valcke was due to visit South America next week but his tour of construction sites in some World Cup host cities has been put back until Blatter and Rousseff have met, a FIFA statement added. Picture taken March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER POLITICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION WORLD CUP) 
BRAZIL-CRACK/
RTR30B98 
April 04, 2012 
Women consume crack in downtown Manaus March 19, 2012. Many Brazilian cities now have their own "cracklands,"... 
Manaus, Brazil 
To match Feature BRAZIL-CRACK/ 
Women consume crack in downtown Manaus March 19, 2012. Many Brazilian cities now have their own "cracklands," areas of the city where swarms of crack users have converted entire neighborhoods into nocturnal encampments doubling as open-air crack markets. At nightfall throngs of stupefied buyers crowd around dealers before skulking away behind the telltale glow of cigarette lighters. Sociologists, health experts, and law enforcement officials all agree that crack use is a rapidly growing problem that puts Brazil squarely in the center of the international drug trade, just a few years ahead of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. Picture taken March 19, 2012. To match Feature BRAZIL-CRACK/ REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW) ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 15 OF 24 FOR PACKAGE '24-SEVEN, CRACK IN BRAZIL' 
BRAZIL/
RTR31E94 
April 29, 2012 
A man travels by canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man travels by canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood... 
A man travels by canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood in Manaus, northern Brazil April 29, 2012. The city of Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding in the city, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31E97 
April 29, 2012 
A man travels by a canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man travels by a canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood... 
A man travels by a canoe through floodwaters in a canal branching off the Negro River on the Gloria neighborhood in Manaus, northern Brazil April 29, 2012. The city of Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding in the city, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EAZ 
April 30, 2012 
Children walk on wooden planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Children walk on wood planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
Children walk on wooden planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EB3 
April 30, 2012 
A boat navigates past a house flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A boat navigates past a house flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
A boat navigates past a house flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EB4 
April 30, 2012 
Children look out above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Children look out above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
Children look out above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EB5 
April 30, 2012 
A man walks on wooden planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man walks on wooden planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
A man walks on wooden planks above floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EB6 
April 30, 2012 
A boy uses a discarded refrigerator as a boat in floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A boy uses a discarded refrigerator as a boat in floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus... 
A boy uses a discarded refrigerator as a boat in floodwaters from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EB7 
April 30, 2012 
A man walks on wooden planks inside his home flooded by the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man walks on wooden planks inside his home flooded by the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
A man walks on wooden planks inside his home flooded by the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31EBB 
April 30, 2012 
A general view of homes flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A general view of homes flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro in Manaus 
A general view of homes flooded from the overflowing Rio Negro, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in the Gloria neighborhood of Manaus, April 29, 2012. Manaus declared a state of emergency due to river flooding, which is estimated to affect more than 3,600 families in the city and nearly 50,000 in the region, if the water levels continue to rise, according to the Civil Defense. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) POLITICS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J02 
May 02, 2012 
Children stand on a makeshift platform as their neighbourhood is flooded by waters from the Rio Negro,... 
Manaus, Brazil 
Children stand on a makeshift platform as their neighbourhood is flooded by waters from the Rio Negro... 
Children stand on a makeshift platform as their neighbourhood is flooded by waters from the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, in Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J2H 
May 02, 2012 
People look at the level of the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, against... 
Manaus, Brazil 
People look at the level of the Rio Negro, against a board marking the water levels during the highest... 
People look at the level of the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, against a board marking the water levels during the highest floods in the region's recorded history, at the Port of Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J2W 
May 02, 2012 
A man looks at the level of the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, against... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A man looks at the level of the Rio Negro, against a board marking the water levels during the highest... 
A man looks at the level of the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, against a board marking the water levels during the highest floods in the region's recorded history, at the Port of Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J3A 
May 02, 2012 
A woman walks on a makeshift platform above floodwaters from the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A woman walks on a makeshift platform above floodwaters from the Rio Negro in Manaus 
A woman walks on a makeshift platform above floodwaters from the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, in Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J3J 
May 02, 2012 
A couple remain inside their home flooded by the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A couple remain inside their home flooded by the Rio Negro in Manaus 
A couple remain inside their home flooded by the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, in Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J3Q 
May 02, 2012 
A woman walks past a pool table inside a restaurant flooded by the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A woman walks past a pool table inside a restaurant flooded by the Rio Negro in Manaus 
A woman walks past a pool table inside a restaurant flooded by the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, in Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31J44 
May 02, 2012 
A car with "for sale" written on its windshield, is seen partially submerged in the floodwaters of the... 
Manaus, Brazil 
A car is seen partially submerged in the floodwaters of the Rio Negro in Manaus 
A car with "for sale" written on its windshield, is seen partially submerged in the floodwaters of the Rio Negro, one of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River, in Manaus May 2, 2012. As the water level of Rio Negro approaches its historic maximum level of 29.3 metres (96 feet) in 2009, Brazilian Geological Service estimates this year's flood to pass it by nearly one metre (3.28 feet) to break a new record. According to Brazil's Civil Defence, about 50,000 families have already been displaced by the flood. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M5Y 
May 04, 2012 
A man paddles his boat along a street of Anama flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles his boat along a street of Anama flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes 
A man paddles his boat along a street of Anama flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, 160 kms (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M60 
May 04, 2012 
Residents paddle a boat to navigate near a public telephone booth along the streets of Anama flooded... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Residents paddle a boat to navigate near a public telephone booth along the streets of Anama flooded... 
Residents paddle a boat to navigate near a public telephone booth along the streets of Anama flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M68 
May 04, 2012 
Residents use a boat to navigate past a bank flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Residents use a boat to navigate past a bank flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes 
Residents use a boat to navigate past a bank flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 kms (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M6D 
May 04, 2012 
Children stand on the porch of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Children stand on the porch of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
Children stand on the porch of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 kms (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M6M 
May 04, 2012 
Children arrive at their home by boat as a street sign is partially submerged in the water from the rising... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Children arrive at their home by boat as a street sign is barely visible in Anama 
Children arrive at their home by boat as a street sign is partially submerged in the water from the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M6P 
May 04, 2012 
A partially submerged street sign is seen in the water from the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A partially submerged street sign is seen in the water from the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
A partially submerged street sign is seen in the water from the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M6R 
May 04, 2012 
Homes sit in floodwater from the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River,... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Homes sit in floodwater from the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
Homes sit in floodwater from the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M70 
May 04, 2012 
A girl paddles past homes, flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A girl paddles past homes, flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
A girl paddles past homes, flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M77 
May 04, 2012 
A girl paddles past homes flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A girl paddles past homes flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
A girl paddles past homes flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M7D 
May 04, 2012 
Residents play in front of a home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Residents play in front of a home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
Residents play in front of a home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M7J 
May 05, 2012 
Children swim in front of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Children swim in front of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
Children swim in front of their home flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31M7Q 
May 05, 2012 
Girls play in the a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Girls play in the a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes in Anama 
Girls play in the a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 4, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIC 
May 05, 2012 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIF 
May 05, 2012 
A girl paddles past other residents in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A girl paddles past other residents in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
A girl paddles past other residents in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIH 
May 05, 2012 
Residents paddle in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Residents paddle in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the... 
Residents paddle in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIJ 
May 05, 2012 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIR 
May 05, 2012 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NIT 
May 05, 2012 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
A man paddles in a street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJ1 
May 05, 2012 
A man paddles in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A man paddles in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
A man paddles in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJ8 
May 05, 2012 
A view of a partially submerged church in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A view of a partially submerged church in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two... 
A view of a partially submerged church in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT RELIGION) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJB 
May 05, 2012 
Residents paddle in street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Residents paddle in street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
Residents paddle in street flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJF 
May 05, 2012 
A view of a partially submerged area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A view of a partially submerged area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
A view of a partially submerged area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJH 
May 05, 2012 
A view of a partially submerged area in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
A view of a partially submerged area in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main... 
A view of a partially submerged area in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJN 
May 05, 2012 
Dogs stand in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Dogs stand in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon... 
Dogs stand in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) 
BRAZIL/
RTR31NJS 
May 05, 2012 
Cattle move into a corral in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
ANAMA, Brazil 
Cattle move into a corral in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches... 
Cattle move into a corral in an area flooded by the rising Rio Solimoes, one of the two main branches of the Amazon River, in Anama, 160 km (100 miles) west of Manaus May 5, 2012. While a swath of the Brazilian Amazon is under a state of emergency as rivers overflow in one of the worst floods on record, the country's northeastern region faces its worst drought in the last 30 years, affecting well over 500 towns and cities, according to data from different government monitoring agencies. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) 
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