Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Moab

USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMY
January 09, 2019
Cars sit in the parking lot of the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Cars sit in the parking lot of the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Cars sit in the parking lot of the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMW
January 09, 2019
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMV
January 09, 2019
Government vehicles sit idle at the visitor center which is closed because of the partial government...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Government vehicles sit idle at the visitor center which is closed because of the partial government...
Government vehicles sit idle at the visitor center which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMU
January 09, 2019
A car drives past an entrance station, which is unmanned because of the partial government shutdown,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A car drives past an entrance station, which is unmanned because of the partial government shutdown,...
A car drives past an entrance station, which is unmanned because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMT
January 09, 2019
Hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National...
Hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMS
January 09, 2019
A hiker walks past the main road gate, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A hiker walks past the main road gate, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in...
A hiker walks past the main road gate, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZMQ
January 09, 2019
Restrooms at the visitor center are closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Restrooms at the visitor center are closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National...
Restrooms at the visitor center are closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZM0
January 09, 2019
A visitor looks at information signs at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed ...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A visitor looks at information signs at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed ...
A visitor looks at information signs at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZLV
January 09, 2019
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown,...
Two hikers walk past large red rock cliffs on a road which is closed due to the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZLS
January 09, 2019
A padlock hangs from the gate that closes the main road, which is closed because of the partial government...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A padlock hangs from the gate that closes the main road, which is closed because of the partial government...
A padlock hangs from the gate that closes the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, as visitors stand in the parking lot in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZL6
January 09, 2019
A man from Saudi Arabia walks back to the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A man from Saudi Arabia walks back to the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government...
A man from Saudi Arabia walks back to the visitor center, which is closed due to the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZL4
January 09, 2019
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial...
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZL1
January 09, 2019
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial...
Visitors walk through the visitor center parking lot past a road which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZKY
January 09, 2019
Local residence Jeff Cox volunteers to pick up trash at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Local residence Jeff Cox volunteers to pick up trash at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which...
Local residence Jeff Cox volunteers to pick up trash at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZJX
January 09, 2019
Local resident Jeff Cox (L) gives hiking advice to Martin Snyder (C) and Maria Ingeboreg (R) from Germany...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Local resident Jeff Cox gives hiking advice to Martin Snyder and Maria Ingeboreg from Germany at the...
Local resident Jeff Cox (L) gives hiking advice to Martin Snyder (C) and Maria Ingeboreg (R) from Germany at the visitor center of Arches National Park, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZJW
January 09, 2019
Visitors walk down the main road, which is closed to vehicle traffic because of the partial government...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Visitors walk down the main road, which is closed to vehicle traffic because of the partial government...
Visitors walk down the main road, which is closed to vehicle traffic because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZJG
January 09, 2019
Two hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Two hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches...
Two hikers walk up the main road, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Arches National Park, Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZJ9
January 09, 2019
A man walks past the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A man walks past the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because...
A man walks past the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
USA-SHUTDOWN/
RTS29ZJ3
January 09, 2019
Two wom?n take a picture in front of the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Two wom?n take a picture in front of the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which...
Two wom?n take a picture in front of the main sign at the visitor center in Arches National Park, which is closed because of the partial government shutdown, in Utah, U.S., January 9, 2019. REUTERS/George Frey
UTAH-GRAFFITI
RTX2C4D3
April 29, 2016
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. Graffiti etched into one of the...
Moab, UNITED STATES
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. Graffiti etched into one of the popular red rock arches in Utah's Arches National Park may be too deep to be repaired, the park's superintendent said on April 28, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Platiau/File photo
USA/
RTX18YNZ
February 17, 2014
An aerial view of Deanna Irvin as she sledboards past her mother Mary Irvin (L), on a sand hill outside...
Moab, UNITED STATES
An aerial view Deanna Irvin as sledboards past her mother Mary Irvin on a sand hill outside Moab Utah...
An aerial view of Deanna Irvin as she sledboards past her mother Mary Irvin (L), on a sand hill outside Moab, Utah, February 16, 2014. Temperatures in southeastern Utah were in the upper 60's Fahrenheit over the Presidents' Day holiday weekend. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTX18YNX
February 17, 2014
An aerial view as Deanna Irvin sledboards on a sand hill outside Moab, Utah, February 16, 2014. Temperatures...
Moab, UNITED STATES
An aerial view as Deanna Irvin as she sledboards on a sand hill outside Moab Utah
An aerial view as Deanna Irvin sledboards on a sand hill outside Moab, Utah, February 16, 2014. Temperatures in southeastern Utah were in the upper 60's Fahrenheit over the Presidents' Day holiday weekend. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AG7Z
November 15, 2012
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AG7W
November 15, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, harvests a beet from the community garden...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster harvests a beet from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, harvests a beet from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AG7V
November 15, 2012
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (L),shops with her sister-wife Betsy Barlow...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Bradee Barlow shops with her sister wife Betsy Barlow in the store room at the Rockland Ranch community...
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (L),shops with her sister-wife Betsy Barlow in the store room at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEYK
November 14, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina Foster in their home blasted from a rock...
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina Foster, second from left, and several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
USA/
RTR3AEYJ
November 14, 2012
Evangelina Foster, whose parents are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, eats dinner at her home...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Evangelina Foster eats dinner at her home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside...
Evangelina Foster, whose parents are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, eats dinner at her home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
USA/
RTR3AEYH
November 14, 2012
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, eats...
Moab, UNITED STATES
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster eats dinner in their home blasted a rock wall at...
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, eats dinner in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
USA/
RTR3AEYG
November 14, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, left, prepares dinner with his first wife...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster prepares dinner with his first wife Catrina Foster in their home blasted from a rock wall...
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, left, prepares dinner with his first wife Catrina Foster and their daughter Evangelina, 1, the youngest of several of his 13 children from his two wives, in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA/
RTR3AEYF
November 14, 2012
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Bradee Barlow holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she shops at the store room at the Rockland Ranch...
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she shops at the store room at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEYE
November 14, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, visits with several of his 13 children from...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster visits with several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock...
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, visits with several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
USA/
RTR3AEYD
November 14, 2012
Catrina Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, brushes her daughter Christa Foster's hair,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Catrina Foster brushes her daughter's hair in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch...
Catrina Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, brushes her daughter Christa Foster's hair, 9, in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AEYC
November 14, 2012
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, sorts potatoes from the community garden...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Suzanne Morrison sorts potatoes from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab...
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, sorts potatoes from the community garden with her daughter Eve, 2, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEYB
November 14, 2012
Melinda Gilbert and her husband Brian Gilbert, fundamentalist Mormons who are monogamous, harvest potatoes...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Melinda Gilbert, left, and her husband Brian Gilbert harvests potatoes at the Rockland Ranch community...
Melinda Gilbert and her husband Brian Gilbert, fundamentalist Mormons who are monogamous, harvest potatoes at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEYA
November 14, 2012
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community...
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA/
RTR3AEY9
November 14, 2012
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who are practicing polygamy, harvest the...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Fundamentalist Mormons harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community...
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who are practicing polygamy, harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEY8
November 14, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children at the Rockland...
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children from his two wives at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AEY7
November 14, 2012
Moroni Foster, 13, whose family are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, holds a beet he collected...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Moroni Foster holds a beet he collected from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside...
Moroni Foster, 13, whose family are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, holds a beet he collected from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEY5
November 14, 2012
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, along with his first wife Catrina Foster and...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Enoch Foster along with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children enters the Charity...
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, along with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children from his two wives, enter the Charity House at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AEY4
November 14, 2012
Cary Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, (L), harvests potatoes with Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Cary Knecht harvest potatoes with Enoch Foster at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Cary Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, (L), harvests potatoes with Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEY0
November 14, 2012
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who practice polygamy, harvest the community...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Fundamentalist Mormons harvest the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who practice polygamy, harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE)
USA/
RTR3AEXX
November 14, 2012
Anna Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, tends to her newborn daughter Evahny Knecht,...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Anna Knecht tends to her newborn daughter at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Anna Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, tends to her newborn daughter Evahny Knecht, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA/
RTR3AEXU
November 14, 2012
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (2nd L) harvests beets with her daughter...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Suzanne Morrison harvests beets at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (2nd L) harvests beets with her daughter Sophia Morrison, 8, (L), and Melinda Gilbert, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD)
USA/
RTR3AEXT
November 14, 2012
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA/
RTR3AEXQ
November 14, 2012
Abel Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, tends to a community garden with several...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Abel Morrison tends to a community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab
Abel Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, tends to a community garden with several of his children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
MOAB/
RTR38KIB
September 29, 2012
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012....
Moab, UNITED STATES
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KI9
September 29, 2012
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012....
Moab, UNITED STATES
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab
A vintage western carriage is put on display near the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KI3
September 29, 2012
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED...
Moab, UNITED STATES
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KI2
September 29, 2012
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KI1
September 29, 2012
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED...
Moab, UNITED STATES
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
Tourists gather at the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KHY
September 29, 2012
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED...
Moab, UNITED STATES
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
MOAB/
RTR38KHX
September 29, 2012
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE...
Moab, UNITED STATES
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah
General view of the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah August 16, 2012. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
SPORT OLYMPICS
RTR151LR
February 04, 2002
Tribal elder Frank Arrowchio hands off the Olympic Torch to the first
runner of the day, Stephanie Spann,...
Moab, USA
OLYMPIC TORCH IS PASSED NEAR ARCHES NATIONAL PARK IN MOAB.
Tribal elder Frank Arrowchio hands off the Olympic Torch to the first
runner of the day, Stephanie Spann, during the Olympic Torch Relay at
the Arches National Park in Moab, Utah February 4, 2002.
REUTERS/Pool/Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

KL/SV
SPORT OLYMPICS
RTRSB2U
February 04, 2002
Stephanie Spann (L) takes the Olympic Torch from tribal elder Frank
Arrowchio after Arrowchio performed...
Moab, United States of America
OLYMPIC TORCH IS PASSED IN ARCHES NATIONAL PARK IN MOAB.
Stephanie Spann (L) takes the Olympic Torch from tribal elder Frank
Arrowchio after Arrowchio performed a ceremony at the Arches National
Park in Moab, Utah during the Olympic Torch Relay February 4, 2002.
REUTERS/Todd Warshaw/Getty Images/Pool

KL
SPORT OLYMPICS
RTRSB2Q
February 04, 2002
Stephanie Spann (L) takes the Olympic Torch from tribal elder Frank
Arrowchio after Arrowchio performed...
Moab, United States of America
OLYMPIC TORCH IS PASSED IN ARCHES NATIONAL PARK IN MOAB.
Stephanie Spann (L) takes the Olympic Torch from tribal elder Frank
Arrowchio after Arrowchio performed a ceremony at the Arches National
Park in Moab, Utah during the Olympic Torch Relay February 4, 2002.
REUTERS/Todd Warshaw/Getty Images/Pool

KL
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1