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Search results for: Simon Gardner

USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WIK
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado points to the United States across the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo),...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Guardado points to the United States across the border between Mexico and the U.S. as...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado points to the United States across the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), the border between Mexico and the U.S., as he speaks to Reuters in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WIF
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WID
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WI6
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014....
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WGF
October 12, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014....
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WFW
October 12, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
MEXICO-REFORMS/LEFTIST
RTX132R4
August 31, 2013
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures during an interview with Reuters in Catemaco August...
Catemaco, Mexico
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador during interview in Catemaco
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures during an interview with Reuters in Catemaco August 30, 2013. Obrador has vowed to stop the government's energy and tax reforms and hopes to lead even bigger protests than when he brought central Mexico City to a standstill after narrowly losing the 2006 presidential election. Picture taken August 30, 2013. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS PROFILE)
MEXICO-REFORMS/LEFTIST
RTX132R2
August 31, 2013
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures during an interview with Reuters in Catemaco August...
Catemaco, Mexico
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador during interview in Catemaco
Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures during an interview with Reuters in Catemaco August 30, 2013. Obrador has vowed to stop the government's energy and tax reforms and hopes to lead even bigger protests than when he brought central Mexico City to a standstill after narrowly losing the 2006 presidential election. Picture taken August 30, 2013. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS PROFILE)
CUBA-POPE/VIRGIN
RTR2ZUVS
March 25, 2012
Teenager Lisette Catanares poses for her parents in the dress she is wearing to celebrate her 15th birthday,...
EL COBRE, Cuba
A teenager poses for her parents in front of a table of offerings left for the Virgin of Charity of El...
Teenager Lisette Catanares poses for her parents in the dress she is wearing to celebrate her 15th birthday, in front of a table of offerings that she and many other Cuban Catholics left for the Virgin of Charity of El Cobre, the country's patron saint, in a sanctuary in El Cobre village March 25, 2012. The icon of the Virgin, revered by Cuba's independence heroes ever since it was discovered floating in a bay by fishermen in 1612, is the centerpiece of a visit by Pope Benedict XVI in the country starting on March 26. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (CUBA - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION)
CHILE/TRIBE
RTR22GKL
December 10, 2008
A general view of Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south of Santiago November 29, 2008....
Santiago, Chile
A general view of Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south of Santiago
A general view of Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south of Santiago November 29, 2008. Hawking sea lion skin souvenir canoes at one of South America's most remote outposts, Francisco Arroyo is among the last of the line of a Patagonian tribe staring down the barrel of extinction. Picture taken November 29, 2008. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (CHILE)
CHILE/TRIBE
RTR22GKG
December 10, 2008
A boat sails past the Serrano glacier next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south...
Santiago, Chile
A boat sails past the Serrano glacier next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south...
A boat sails past the Serrano glacier next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south of Santiago November 29, 2008. Hawking sea lion skin souvenir canoes at one of South America's most remote outposts, Francisco Arroyo is among the last of the line of a Patagonian tribe staring down the barrel of extinction. Picture taken November 29, 2008. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (CHILE)
CHILE/TRIBE
RTR22GK9
December 10, 2008
A member of the Kawesqar tribe, Francisco Arroyo, sells handcrafted canoes in Puerto Eden at the Patagonia...
Santiago, Chile
A member of Kawesqar tribe Francisco Arroyo sells handcrafted canoes at Puerto Eden at the Patagonia...
A member of the Kawesqar tribe, Francisco Arroyo, sells handcrafted canoes in Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region some 2300 km south of Santiago November 29, 2008. Hawking sea lion skin souvenir canoes at one of South America's most remote outposts, Arroyo is among the last of the line of a Patagonian tribe staring down the barrel of extinction. Picture taken November 29, 2008. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (CHILE)
CHILE/
RTR22GJO
December 10, 2008
Magallanes gooses fly over the Ultima Esperanza fiord next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region, November...
Santiago, Chile
Magallanes gooses fly over the Ultima Esperanza fiord next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region
Magallanes gooses fly over the Ultima Esperanza fiord next to Puerto Eden at the Patagonia region, November 29, 2008. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (CHILE)
SRILANKA-RECRUITMENT/
RTR1S1L3
July 20, 2007
Tamil Tiger rebels take up position as they fire a rocket in an attack on a mock-up of a Sri Lankan Government...
Kilinochchi, Sri Lanka
match feature SRILANKA-RECRUITMENT/
Tamil Tiger rebels take up position as they fire a rocket in an attack on a mock-up of a Sri Lankan Government military complex during jungle warfare tactics training in the north of Sri Lanka July 13, 2007. In Tamil Tiger territory, youths are living in hiding to avoid being forcibly recruited by the rebels and sent to fight in a Sri Lankan civil war they don't believe in. Picture taken July 13, 2007. To match feature SRILANKA-RECRUITMENT/ REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA REFUGEES
RTR1NI4G
March 15, 2007
An internal displaced ethnic Tamil boy holds a bag at a refugee camp in Batticaloa March 15, 2007. More...
Batticaloa, Sri Lanka
An internal displaced ethnic Tamil boy holds a bag at a refugee camp in Batticaloa
An internal displaced ethnic Tamil boy holds a bag at a refugee camp in Batticaloa March 15, 2007. More than 40,000 people have fled rebel-held territory in the eastern district of Batticaloa over the past week as the military seeks to drive Tamil Tiger rebels from the area amid a new chapter in a two-decade civil war. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRIEST/
RTR1M4F5
February 08, 2007
High Priest Parameshwara Kurukkal puts a religious swale on Sri Lanka's President Mahinda Rajapakse (L)...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
High Priest Kurukkal puts a religious swale on Sri Lanka's President Rajapakse in a traditional blessing...
High Priest Parameshwara Kurukkal puts a religious swale on Sri Lanka's President Mahinda Rajapakse (L) in a traditional blessing during Rajapakse's visit to Vakarai, about 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Rajapakse on Thursday condemned the Tamil Tigers for killing Kurukkal, the Hindu priest who blessed him during a landmark visit to a captured eastern rebel stronghold days earlier. Picture taken February 3, 2007. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRIEST/
RTR1M4F0
February 08, 2007
High Priest Parameshwara Kurukkal smears ash on Sri Lanka's President Mahinda Rajapakse's (L) forehead...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
High Priest Kurukkal smears ash on Sri Lanka's President Rajapakse's forehead in a traditional blessing...
High Priest Parameshwara Kurukkal smears ash on Sri Lanka's President Mahinda Rajapakse's (L) forehead in a traditional blessing during Rajapakse's visit to Vakarai, about 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Rajapakse on Thursday condemned the Tamil Tigers for killing Kurukkal, the Hindu priest who blessed him during a landmark visit to a captured eastern rebel stronghold days earlier. Picture taken February 3, 2007. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRESIDENT/
RTR1LXVJ
February 03, 2007
Army commandos gather to meet Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse (not pictured) during his visit...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
Army commandos gather to meet Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse during his visit to Vakarai
Army commandos gather to meet Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse (not pictured) during his visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Surveying the newly captured eastern rebel stronghold of Vakarai, Rajapakse on Saturday vowed to tame the Tamil Tiger rebels and liberate civilians, but said the door remained open to resume peace talks. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRESIDENT/
RTR1LXVC
February 03, 2007
Army commandos ride a military vehicle in Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
Army commandos ride a military vehicle in Vakarai
Army commandos ride a military vehicle in Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Surveying the newly captured eastern rebel stronghold of Vakarai, Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse on Saturday vowed to tame the Tamil Tiger rebels and liberate civilians, but said the door remained open to resume peace talks. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRESIDENT/
RTR1LXV7
February 03, 2007
A Hindu priest puts holy ash on the forehead of Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse during his visit...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
Hindu priest puts holy ash on forehead of Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse in Vakarai
A Hindu priest puts holy ash on the forehead of Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse during his visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Surveying the newly captured eastern rebel stronghold of Vakarai, Rajapakse on Saturday vowed to tame the Tamil Tiger rebels and liberate civilians, but said the door remained open to resume peace talks. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRESIDENT/
RTR1LXV0
February 03, 2007
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks to soldiers during a visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks to soldiers during a visit to Vakarai
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks to soldiers during a visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Surveying the newly captured eastern rebel stronghold, Rajapakse on Saturday vowed to tame the Tamil Tiger rebels and liberate civilians, but said the door remained open to resume peace talks. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
SRILANKA-PRESIDENT/
RTR1LXUM
February 03, 2007
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks with soldiers during a visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140...
Vakarai, Sri Lanka
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks with soldiers during a visit to Vakarai
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapakse talks with soldiers during a visit to Vakarai, around 225 km (140 miles) northeast of Colombo, February 3, 2007. Surveying the newly captured eastern rebel stronghold, Rajapakse on Saturday vowed to tame the Tamil Tiger rebels and liberate civilians, but said the door remained open to resume peace talks. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (SRI LANKA)
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