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Search results for: Carolina Camps

ARGENTINA-MACRI/
RTX1Y4NI
December 10, 2015
People gather at Plaza de Mayo Square in front of the Government House during the inauguration of Argentina's...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
People gather at Plaza de Mayo Square in front of the Government House during the inauguration of Argentina's...
People gather at Plaza de Mayo Square in front of the Government House during the inauguration of Argentina's President Mauricio Macri in Buenos Aires, December 10, 2015. REUTERS/Carolina Camps
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHJ2
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate in the shower after beating Excursionistas to...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate in the shower after beating Excursionistas in...
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate in the shower after beating Excursionistas to win their third league championship title in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014.Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHIQ
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third league championship title in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHIM
May 16, 2014
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club fixes her hair after celebrating the team's victory over...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club fixes her hair after celebrating the team's victory over...
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club fixes her hair after celebrating the team's victory over Excursionistas to win their third league championship title in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHID
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third league championship title in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHIC
May 16, 2014
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club ties the shoelaces of her team's goalkeeper during a league...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club ties the shoelaces of her team's goalkeeper during a league...
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club ties the shoelaces of her team's goalkeeper during a league match against Excursionistas in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHI5
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate after beating Excursionistas to win their third league championship title in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHI2
May 16, 2014
Fans of Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate a goal against River Plate in a league match in Buenos...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Fans of Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate a goal against River Plate in Buenos Aires
Fans of Boca Juniors women's soccer club celebrate a goal against River Plate in a league match in Buenos Aires December 8, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken December 8, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHHZ
May 16, 2014
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club cleans her cleats before playing a league match against...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club cleans her cleats before playing a league match against...
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club cleans her cleats before playing a league match against Excursionistas in Buenos Aires May 11, 2014. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken May 11, 2014. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHHW
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors (L) and River Plate women's soccer clubs battle for the ball in a league match...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors and River Plate women's soccer clubs battle for the ball in a league match...
Players from Boca Juniors (L) and River Plate women's soccer clubs battle for the ball in a league match in Buenos Aires December 8, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken December 8, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHHI
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club rally in the locker room before playing River Plate in...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club rally in the locker room before playing River Plate in...
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club rally in the locker room before playing River Plate in a league match in Buenos Aires December 8, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken December 8, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHHB
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors (R) and Villa San Carlos women's soccer clubs battle for the ball during a...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors and Villa San Carlos women's soccer clubs battle for the ball in Buenos Aires...
Players from Boca Juniors (R) and Villa San Carlos women's soccer clubs battle for the ball during a league match in Buenos Aires October 6, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken October 6, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHHA
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors (R) and Hebraica women's soccer clubs battle for the ball during a league match...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors and Hebraica women's soccer clubs battle for the ball in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors (R) and Hebraica women's soccer clubs battle for the ball during a league match in Buenos Aires November 9, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken November 9, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHH9
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk in the locker room at halftime in their match against...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk in the locker room at halftime in their match against...
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk in the locker room at halftime in their match against Villa San Carlos in Buenos Aires October 6, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken October 6, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHH8
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk before a photo session in Buenos Aires October 4,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk before a photo session in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club talk before a photo session in Buenos Aires October 4, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken October 4, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHH2
May 16, 2014
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club pose for a photo session in Buenos Aires October 4, 2013....
Buenos Aires, Brazil
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club pose for a photo session in Buenos Aires
Players from Boca Juniors women's soccer club pose for a photo session in Buenos Aires October 4, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken October 4, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN
RTR3PHGZ
May 16, 2014
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club holds the ball during a practice session in Buenos Aires...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club holds the ball during a practice session in Buenos Aires...
A player from Boca Juniors women's soccer club holds the ball during a practice session in Buenos Aires September 20, 2013. Long on the soccer sidelines, more and more South American women are striking back by lacing up their boots and embracing the region's most cherished sport. The surge is part of a global boom, with an estimated 29 million women and girls playing worldwide. But it is especially salient for South America, a region revered for its ball game and infamous for its machismo. To match Feature SOCCER-LATAM/WOMEN Picture taken September 20, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZY3
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio (L), sister of Pope Francis, accompanied by an unidentified person, arrives at...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, arrives at her home in Buenos Aires
Maria Elena Bergoglio (L), sister of Pope Francis, accompanied by an unidentified person, arrives at her home in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZY0
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, arrives at her home in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, arrives at her home in Buenos Aires
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, arrives at her home in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZXX
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, receives letters from children for her brother as she...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, receives letters from children for her brother as she...
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, receives letters from children for her brother as she arrives at her home in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZK1
March 14, 2013
Our Lady of Itati chapel, where Pope Francis, then Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, used...
Ituzaingo, Argentina
Our Lady of Itati chapel is seen in Ituzaingo
Our Lady of Itati chapel, where Pope Francis, then Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, used to perform baptisms, is seen in Ituzaingo, Buenos Aires province March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZJZ
March 14, 2013
A man cycles past Our Lady of Itati chapel, where Pope Francis, then Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of...
Ituzaingo, Argentina
A man cycles past Our Lady of Itati chapel in Ituzaingo
A man cycles past Our Lady of Itati chapel, where Pope Francis, then Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, used to perform baptisms, in Ituzaingo, Buenos Aires province March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZIZ
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio (R), sister of Pope Francis, is congratulated by a neighbor outside her home in...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, is congratulated by a neighbor outside her home in Buenos...
Maria Elena Bergoglio (R), sister of Pope Francis, is congratulated by a neighbor outside her home in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZIW
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires March...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-FRANCIS/
RTR3EZIN
March 14, 2013
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires March...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires
Maria Elena Bergoglio, sister of Pope Francis, speaks to the media from a vehicle in Buenos Aires March 14, 2013. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: RELIGION)
ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBFV
December 07, 2012
Silvia Rodas talks with her four-year-old daughter Anahi inside her cell at the Unidad (Unit) 33 prison...
La Plata, Argentina
File photo of Silvia Rodas talking to her daughter Anahi inside her cell at the Unidad (Unit) 33 prison...
Silvia Rodas talks with her four-year-old daughter Anahi inside her cell at the Unidad (Unit) 33 prison in Los Hornos, near La Plata in this October 17, 2007 file photo. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 17, 2007. REUTERS/Carolina Camps/Files (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 27 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBC4
December 07, 2012
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, plays with her four-year-old...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, plays with her daughter Milagros...
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, plays with her four-year-old daughter Milagros in Magdalena, August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 50 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBC2
December 07, 2012
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, takes a shower in Magdalena...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, takes a shower in Magdalena
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, takes a shower in Magdalena August 21, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with her daughter Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 21, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 51 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBBZ
December 07, 2012
Four-year-old Milagros puts on lipstick while her mother Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Milagros puts on lipstick while her mother Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial...
Four-year-old Milagros puts on lipstick while her mother Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, watches in Magdalena August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 49 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBBY
December 07, 2012
Jorgelina and her niece, four-year-old Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara, 28, is currently in prison...
La Plata, Argentina
Jorgelina and her niece Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara is currently in prison, travels to visit...
Jorgelina and her niece, four-year-old Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara, 28, is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, travel to visit Cigara in La Plata August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 52 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBBW
December 07, 2012
Valeria Cigara, who is pregnant with her first child Milagros, poses as she is imprisoned in jail due...
LOS HORNOS, Argentina
Valeria Cigara, who is pregnant with her first child Milagros, poses as she is in jail due to attempted...
Valeria Cigara, who is pregnant with her first child Milagros, poses as she is imprisoned in jail due to attempted larceny, in Los Hornos November 4, 2007. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken November 4, 2007. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 53 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
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December 07, 2012
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, looks through the bars in...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, looks through the bars in Magdalena...
Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, looks through the bars in Magdalena August 21, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with her daughter Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 21, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 47 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBBU
December 07, 2012
Jorgelina, sister of Valeria Cigara, 28, combs the hair of Valeria's four-year-old daughter Milagros...
La Plata, Argentina
Jorgelina, sister of Valeria Cigara, combs the hair of Valeria's four-year-old daughter Milagros in La...
Jorgelina, sister of Valeria Cigara, 28, combs the hair of Valeria's four-year-old daughter Milagros in La Plata August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 42 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
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December 07, 2012
Valeria Cigara (R), 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, walk with her four-year-old...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, walk with her daughter and sister...
Valeria Cigara (R), 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, walk with her four-year-old daughter Milagros and her sister Jorgelina (L) down the prison corridors in Magdalena August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 48 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
RTR3BBBS
December 07, 2012
Four-year-old Milagros (C) is helped to get dressed by her grandmother Silvia (R) after she was searched...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Milagros is helped to get dressed by her grandmother before visiting her mother in prison in Magdalena...
Four-year-old Milagros (C) is helped to get dressed by her grandmother Silvia (R) after she was searched before visiting her mother Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, in Magdalena August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 44 OF 53 FOR PACKAGE 'RAISED BEHIND BARS'
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ARGENTINA/
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December 07, 2012
In this combination photograph shows Valeria Cigara (L) posing when she was pregnant with her daughter...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A combination photograph of Valeria Cigara with her daughter Milagros before and after giving birth in...
In this combination photograph shows Valeria Cigara (L) posing when she was pregnant with her daughter Milagros as she was serving a sentence for robbery in the Los Hornos women's prison in La Plata November 4, 2007; and Cigara hugging Milagros (R), now four-year-old, during a visit by Milagros to her mother's latest prison in Magdalena, where Cigara is awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery August 19, 2012. Cigara raised Milagros in prison with her until she turned two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Pictures taken November 4, 2007 (L) and August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


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December 07, 2012
Four-year-old Milagros peers at her mother Valeria Cigara (far inside the cell), 28, who is currently...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Milagros peers at her mother Valeria Cigara, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, in...
Four-year-old Milagros peers at her mother Valeria Cigara (far inside the cell), 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, in Magdalena August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, who is currently under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is currently under house arrest, poses with her for then one-year-old son Lautaro inside...
Julia Romero, who is currently under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, poses with her then one-year-old son Lautaro inside a jail in Buenos Aires October 13, 2007. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken October 13, 2007 REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Four-year-old Milagros (L) looks at a security guard (R) inking the fingers of her grandmother Silvia...
MAGDALENA, Argentina
Milagros looks at a security guard inking the fingers of her grandmother before visiting Milagros' mother...
Four-year-old Milagros (L) looks at a security guard (R) inking the fingers of her grandmother Silvia before allowing them to visit Milagros' mother Valeria Cigara, 28, who is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, in Magdalena August 19, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 19, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Four-year-old Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara, 28, is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery,...
La Plata, Argentina
Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, plays with her...
Four-year-old Milagros, whose mother Valeria Cigara, 28, is currently in prison awaiting trial for robbery, plays with her soft toys in La Plata August 31, 2012. Cigara, who is in jail awaiting trial for a fourth case of robbery, admits that she suffers from drug addiction and has requested treatment from the prison system. Cigara was pregnant with Milagros during her first jail term in 2007 and gave birth to and raised her daughter in the prison until she was two. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 31, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is currently under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero waits for customers at her kiosk in Buenos Aires
Julia Romero, 42, who is currently under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, waits for customers at her kiosk in Buenos Aires August 10, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. The sign reads, "Open 24 hours everyday." Picture taken August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, and her grandfather Carlos (back), sit in a bus travelling some 700 km (435 miles) to the prison...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi and her grandfather sit in a bus to travel to the prison where her mother Silvia Rodas is serving...
Anahi, 9, and her grandfather Carlos (back), sit in a bus travelling some 700 km (435 miles) to the prison where Anahi's mother Silvia Rodas, 25, is serving a 15-year sentence in Bahia Blanca October 13, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 13, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, kisses her son Lautaro in Buenos Aires...
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, kisses her six-year-old son Lautaro from their home in Buenos Aires August 10, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest, hangs clothes as her son Lautaro watches television in Buenos...
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, hangs clothes on a line as her six-year-old son Lautaro watches television in their home in Buenos Aires July 28, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 28, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero (C), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, embraces her boyfriend in Buenos Aires...
Julia Romero (C), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, embraces her boyfriend Oscar (R) as they are watched by her six-year-old son Lautaro at their home in Buenos Aires July 7, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, serves a customer in her home in Buenos...
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, serves a customer in her home in Buenos Aires, July 28, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 28, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero (C), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest, lies in bed with her boyfriend and son Lautaro in Buenos Aires...
Julia Romero (C), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, lies in bed with her boyfriend Oscar (L) and six-year-old son Lautaro at their home in Buenos Aires July 29, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and she raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 29, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, shows a scar on her stomach in Buenos...
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, shows a scar on her stomach from a stab wound she received in jail, at her home in Buenos Aires August 10, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
In this combination photograph showing Julia Romero (top) posing with her two-year-old son Lautaro in...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A combination photograph of Julia Romero with her son Lautaro inside and outside of prison in Buenos...
In this combination photograph showing Julia Romero (top) posing with her two-year-old son Lautaro in the Los Hornos women's prison, where she was serving a sentence for homicide, in La Plata October 13, 2007; and holding hands with Lautaro (bottom), now six-years-old, outside their home in Buenos Aires July 29, 2012. Romero raised Lautaro in prison with her until her sentence was commuted to house arrest in 2010. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Pictures taken October 13, 2007 (top) and July 29, 2012 (bottom). REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, smokes inside her home in Buenos Aires...
Julia Romero, 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, smokes inside her home in Buenos Aires August 10, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Six-year-old Lautaro, whose mother Julia Romero (not seen), 42, is under house arrest to serve the last...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lautaro, whose mother Julia Romero is under house arrest, watches television in his home in Buenos Aires...
Six-year-old Lautaro, whose mother Julia Romero (not seen), 42, is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, watches television in his home in Buenos Aires July 7, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero (bottom window), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest, waits for customers inside her home in Buenos Aires
Julia Romero (bottom window), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, waits for customers inside her home while her six-year-old son Lautaro (top floor) stands on the flat roof of their house in Buenos Aires July 28, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken July 28, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Julia Romero (L), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Julia Romero, who is under house arrest to serve her sentence, presents herself at a police station in...
Julia Romero (L), 42, who is under house arrest to serve the last 11 years of an 18-year sentence for homicide, presents herself at a police station in Buenos Aires August 10, 2012. Romero survives by selling household items through the window of her kitchen 24 hours a day, which is her only contact with the outside world. Romero was pregnant with her son Lautaro in 2005 when she was convicted and raised her son in prison until he was four. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, after which they must leave to live with family or in a state home. Picture taken August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, reads with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, who is serving a 15-year sentence in prison in Bahia...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi reads with her mother Silvia Rodas who is serving a 15-year sentence in prison in Bahia Blanca
Anahi, 9, reads with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, who is serving a 15-year sentence in prison in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, plays with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, during a visit to the prison where her mother is serving...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi plays with her mother Silvia Rodas during a visit to the prison where Silvia is serving a 15-year...
Anahi, 9, plays with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, during a visit to the prison where her mother is serving a 15-year sentence in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi (R), 9, shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, and grandfather Carlos (L) during a visit...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas and grandfather Carlos during a prison visit in Bahia...
Anahi (R), 9, shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, and grandfather Carlos (L) during a visit to meet her mother who is serving a 15-year sentence prison in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, hugs her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi hugs her mother Silvia Rodas after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year sentence...
Anahi, 9, hugs her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year sentence in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, hugs her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi hugs her mother Silvia Rodas after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year sentence...
Anahi, 9, hugs her mother Silvia Rodas, 25, after visiting her at the prison where she is serving a 15-year sentence, while a prison guard (R) stands nearby in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi (bottom R), 9, shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas (center R), 25, and grandfather Carlos...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas and grandfather Carlos during a prison visit in Bahia...
Anahi (bottom R), 9, shares a moment with her mother Silvia Rodas (center R), 25, and grandfather Carlos during a visit to her mother who is serving a 15-year sentence prison in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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December 07, 2012
Anahi, 9, holds a flower for her mother Silvia Rodas (not seen), 25, during a visit to the prison in...
Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Anahi holds a flower for her mother Silvia Rodas during a visit to the prison in Bahia Blanca
Anahi, 9, holds a flower for her mother Silvia Rodas (not seen), 25, during a visit to the prison in Bahia Blanca October 14, 2012. Rodas was convicted of robbery and attempted homicide at the age of 19 and has since done stints in all the prisons in Buenos Aires province after being moved around due to bad conduct. She ended up in Bahia Blanca, the last prison that would accept her. Her daughter Anahi was three years old when she was convicted and lived in prison with her until she was five. Argentine law allows women prisoners to raise their infant children in jail until the age of four, although Anahi stayed one year longer. Picture taken October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carolina Camps (ARGENTINA - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW)

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