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Search results for: Shipbreaking

PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJC8
February 27, 2012
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap...
Karachi, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) FOR BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE: ALSO SEE GM1E8361BJ001
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJB6
February 27, 2012
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking...
Karachi, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT)
FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GF20000053683
PAKISTAN/
RTR2YWOZ
November 24, 2011
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap...
Karachi, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
INDONESIA/
RTR2CWK5
April 16, 2010
Sopiah and her friend collect rust from a beach at a ship demolition site, near Tanjung Priok port in...
Jakarta, Indonesia
Sopiah and her friend collect rust from a beach at a ship demolition site, near Tanjung Priok port in...
Sopiah and her friend collect rust from a beach at a ship demolition site, near Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta April 16, 2010. Sopiah said she can earn approximately $2 after collecting about 100 kg (220 lbs) of rust a day. The rust is sold to a middleman who will sell it to a factory that will recycle the rust. REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VXE
August 19, 2009
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong.
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VXC
August 19, 2009
Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong.
Workers carry a piece of iron at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH BUSINESS)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VXB
August 19, 2009
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong.
Workers weld a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH BUSINESS)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VX6
August 19, 2009
A worker washes his hands in the river at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
A worker washes his hands in the river at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong
A worker washes his hands in the river at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH BUSINESS)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VX4
August 19, 2009
Workers carry a gas cylinder at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers carry a gas cylinder at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong.
Workers carry a gas cylinder at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, according to environmental organizations. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH BUSINESS)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VVZ
August 19, 2009
Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong
Workers rest after work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on ship breaking for its domestic steel requirements. The ship breaking industry is not subjected to any environmental laws or health and safety regulations for workers. Chittagong ship breaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, environmental organizations said. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS TRANSPORT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BANGLADESH/
RTR26VVX
August 19, 2009
Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking...
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong
Workers work at a ship breaking yard in Chittagong August 19, 2009. Bangladesh is dependent on shipbreaking for its domestic steel requirements. The shipbreaking industry is not subjected to any environmental laws or health and safety regulations for its workers. Chittagong shipbreaking yard is a highly polluted coastal belt of 20 km. The number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region, environmental organizations said. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
RTXD4OW
March 24, 2009
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. A global economic slowdown has hit industries ranging from automakers to investment banks, but in one small town on India's western coast, business is at record levels and workers can hardly keep up with demand. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster. To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files (INDIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
RTXD4OU
March 24, 2009
A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. A global economic slowdown has hit industries ranging from automakers to investment banks, but in one small town on India's western coast, business is at record levels and workers can hardly keep up with demand. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster. To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files (INDIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
RTXD4OS
March 24, 2009
Workers stand beside a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
Workers stand beside a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. A global economic slowdown has hit industries ranging from automakers to investment banks, but in one small town on India's western coast, business is at record levels and workers can hardly keep up with demand. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster. To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files (INDIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
RTXD4OQ
March 24, 2009
Workers collect metal scraps from a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles)...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/
Workers collect metal scraps from a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, in this February 25, 2009 file photo. A global economic slowdown has hit industries ranging from automakers to investment banks, but in one small town on India's western coast, business is at record levels and workers can hardly keep up with demand. In Alang, home to the world's largest ship breaking facility on the coast of Gujarat state, the financial year to April will be one of its best ever, as a slowdown in global trade and lower freight rates mean ships are being scrapped faster. To match feature INDIA-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Amit Dave/Files (INDIA ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
INDIA/
RTXC2RW
February 25, 2009
Workers collect metal scraps of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles)...
ALANG, India
Workers collect metal scraps of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard
Workers collect metal scraps of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, February 25, 2009. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTXC2RM
February 25, 2009
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the...
ALANG, India
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, February 25, 2009. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTXC2RG
February 25, 2009
A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western...
ALANG, India
View of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard
A view of ships being decommissioned at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, February 25, 2009. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
Labour
Labour
Recycling Scrap Metal from Old Ships in Jakarta - 27 Mar 2008
10 PICTURES
Labour
Labour
Ship Breaking in Mumbai - 22 Dec 2006 - 22 Dec 2006
13 PICTURES
INDIA/
RTR1KMDC
December 21, 2006
Indian women push metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The...
Mumbai, India
Indian women push metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai
Indian women push metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMDB
December 21, 2006
A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai...
Mumbai, India
A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai
A worker holds on to a ship railing as he rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMDA
December 21, 2006
A worker with dried mud on his feet rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December...
Mumbai, India
A worker with dried mud on his feet rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai
A worker with dried mud on his feet rests before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMD7
December 21, 2006
Indian workers rest before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko...
Mumbai, India
Indian workers rest before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai
Indian workers rest before resuming work at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMD2
December 21, 2006
A worker with mud on his feet stands on dry ground after finishing work at ship repair dock in Mumbai...
Mumbai, India
A worker with mud on his feet stands on dry ground after finishing work at ship repair dock in Mumbai...
A worker with mud on his feet stands on dry ground after finishing work at ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMCZ
December 21, 2006
Indian women collect metal scraps from a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The...
Mumbai, India
Indian women collect metal scraps from a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai
Indian women collect metal scraps from a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA
RTR1KMCY
December 21, 2006
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006....
Mumbai, India
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMCV
December 21, 2006
An Indian worker stands on a muddy shoreline at low tide as they repair a ship at a ship repair dock...
Mumbai, India
An Indian worker stands on a muddy shoreline at low tide as they repair a ship at a ship repair dock...
An Indian worker stands on a muddy shoreline at low tide as they repair a ship at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Arko Datta (INDIA)
INDIA
RTR1KMCF
December 21, 2006
Indian women clean metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps...
Mumbai, India
Indian women clean metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai
Indian women clean metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMC8
December 21, 2006
An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The...
Mumbai, India
An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai
An Indian woman cleans metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMC5
December 21, 2006
An Indian woman cleans herself after scavenging for metal scraps at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December...
Mumbai, India
An Indian woman cleans herself after scavenging for metal scraps at a ship repair dock in Mumbai
An Indian woman cleans herself after scavenging for metal scraps at a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMC0
December 21, 2006
An Indian woman carries a bag containing metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December...
Mumbai, India
An Indian woman carries a bag containing metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai
An Indian woman carries a bag containing metal scraps salvaged from a ship repair dock in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1KMBU
December 21, 2006
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006....
Mumbai, India
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai
An Indian woman pushes metal scraps across a muddy shoreline at low tide in Mumbai December 21, 2006. The scraps salvaged from the ship repair dock are then sold to recycling companies. Ship-breaking is one of the most dangerous jobs, with workers at risk of accidents and exposure to toxins whose harmful effects emerge years later, according to ILO experts on safety and occupational health. REUTERS/Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi (INDIA)
ENVIRONMENT INDIA SHIP
RTR1G1XX
August 03, 2006
Gopala Krishana, coordinator for the NGO Platform on Shipbreaking, speaks during a news conference in...
New Delhi, India
Krishana coordinator for the NGO Platform on Shipbreaking speaks during a news conference in New Delhi...
Gopala Krishana, coordinator for the NGO Platform on Shipbreaking, speaks during a news conference in New Delhi August 3, 2006. An Indian panel has violated guidelines for ship-breaking laid down by India's Supreme Court by approving the scrapping of a controversial Norwegian cruise liner this week, an environmental alliance said on Thursday. REUTERS/B Mathur (INDIA)
INDIA SHIPYARD
RTR1F78Y
July 05, 2006
Workers remove ladder from a dismantled ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPYARD
Workers remove ladder from a dismantled ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad June 16, 2006. With world metal prices sliding, changes in India's tax structure and the campaign by environmentalists accusing the shipbreaking industry of polluting and not protecting its workers, Alang has been struggling to survive under pressure. Photo taken June 16, 2006. To match feature India-Shipyard. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
INDIA SHIPYARD
RTR1F78X
July 05, 2006
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPYARD
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad June 16, 2006. With world metal prices sliding, changes in India's tax structure and the campaign by environmentalists accusing the shipbreaking industry of polluting and not protecting its workers, Alang has been struggling to survive under pressure. Photo taken June 16, 2006. To match feature India-Shipyard. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
INDIA SHIPYARD
RTR1F78W
July 05, 2006
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the...
ALANG, India
To match feature INDIA-SHIPYARD
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard, about 260 km (162 miles) west from the western Indian city of Ahmedabad June 16, 2006. With world metal prices sliding, changes in India's tax structure and the campaign by environmentalists accusing the shipbreaking industry of polluting and not protecting its workers, Alang has been struggling to survive under pressure. Photo taken June 16, 2006. To match feature India-Shipyard. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA)
TURKEY
RTRHQ6H
December 08, 2004
Greenpeace activists, wearing masks, demonstrate in front of the European Commission building in Ankara,...
Ankara, Turkey
Greenpeace activists demonstrate in front of the European Commission building in Ankara.
Greenpeace activists, wearing masks, demonstrate in front of the European Commission building in Ankara, December 8, 2004, demanding the EU take urgent measures for clean shipbreaking. REUTERS/Umit Bektas UB/
BANGLADESH SHIPBREAKING
RTR872F
November 15, 2003
A Bangladeshi worker carries waste from a scrapped ship at a
shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING.
A Bangladeshi worker carries waste from a scrapped ship at a
shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November 15, 2003. At least 297 people
have been killed and 600 injured in accidents at the Chittagong yard
over the past 12 years, say police and officials in Chittagong, which
handles 80 percent of the country's imports and exports. The yard and
the surrounding sea and shore are badly polluted and the workers - the
yard employs about 35,000 people - have little access to medical
treatment. Picture taken on November 15, 2003. TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE
BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

NA/CP
BANGLADESH
RTR8728
November 15, 2003
A scrapped ship awaits dismantling at a shipbreaking yard on a polluted
beach in Chittagong November...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING.
A scrapped ship awaits dismantling at a shipbreaking yard on a polluted
beach in Chittagong November 15, 2003. At least 297 people have been
killed and 600 injured in accidents at the Chittagong yard over the
past 12 years, say police and officials in Chittagong, which handles 80
percent of the country's imports and exports. The yard and the
surrounding sea and shore are badly polluted and the workers - the yard
employs about 35,000 people - have little access to medical treatment.
Picture taken on November 15, 2003. TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE
BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

NA/CP
BANGLADESH SHIPBREAKING
RTR871N
November 15, 2003
Bangladeshis work at a shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November 15,
2003. At least 297 people have been...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING.
Bangladeshis work at a shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November 15,
2003. At least 297 people have been killed and 600 injured in accidents
at the Chittagong yard over the past 12 years, say police and officials
in Chittagong, which handles 80 percent of the country's imports and
exports. The yard and the surrounding sea and shore are badly polluted
and the workers - the yard employs about 35,000 people - have little
access to medical treatment. Picture taken on November 15, 2003. TO
ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

NA/CP
BANGLADESH SHIPBREAKING
RTR871G
November 15, 2003
Bangladeshis work at a shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November 15,
2003. At least 297 people have been...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING.
Bangladeshis work at a shipbreaking yard in Chittagong November 15,
2003. At least 297 people have been killed and 600 injured in accidents
at the Chittagong yard over the past 12 years, say police and officials
in Chittagong, which handles 80 percent of the country's imports and
exports. The yard and the surrounding sea and shore are badly polluted
and the workers - the yard employs about 35,000 people - have little
access to medical treatment. Picture taken on November 15, 2003. TO
ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

NA/CP
BANGLADESH SHIPBREAKING
RTR8710
November 15, 2003
Black smokes billows from a scrapped ship at a shipbreaking yard in
Chittagong November 15, 2003. At...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING.
Black smokes billows from a scrapped ship at a shipbreaking yard in
Chittagong November 15, 2003. At least 297 people have been killed and
600 injured in accidents at the Chittagong yard over the past 12 years,
say police and officials in Chittagong, which handles 80 percent of the
country's imports and exports. The yard and the surrounding sea and
shore are badly polluted and the workers - the yard employs about
35,000 people - have little access to medical treatment. Picture taken
on November 15, 2003. TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE BANGLADESH-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman

NA/CP
PAKISTAN
RTXM8I6
October 09, 2003
-PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03- Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani shipbreaking...
Karachi, Pakistan
-PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03- Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani shipbreaking.....
-PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03- Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture taken September 13, 2003.
ENVIRONMENT
RTR4KPO
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi
September...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi
September 13, 2003. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer
than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits
waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach.
Picture taken September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4KPB
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani fishermen speak to Reuters at Gaddani village, 50 km from
Karachi September...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani fishermen speak to Reuters at Gaddani village, 50 km from
Karachi September 13, 2003.The fishermen and the international
environmentalists are incensed by the beaching of oil tanker Sea Giant
at Pakistan;s shipbreaking centre of Gaddani, seeing it as another
example of rich Western business taking advantage of lax third-world
standards to dispose of a messy problem on the cheap. Picture taken
September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4KP4
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard,...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a
gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower
is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for
destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture
taken September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4KMP
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard,...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a
gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower
is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for
destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture
taken September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4KM8
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from
Karachi September...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from
Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories high
and longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship ever
built sits waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian
Sea beach. Picture taken September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE
ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT
RTR4KL6
September 13, 2003
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km
from Karachi...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
QUALITY REPEAT

Pakistani labourers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km
from Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories
high and longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship
ever built sits waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful
Arabian Sea beach. Picture taken September 13, 2003. TO MATCH FEATURE
ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Zahid Hussein
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4JUU
September 13, 2003
Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi....
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi. Like a gigantic steel whale 10
stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the
second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for destruction on what
could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture taken September 13,
2003. TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

ZH/PB
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4JUN
September 13, 2003
Pakistani labourers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km
from Karachi. Like a gigantic steel...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
Pakistani labourers take a break at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km
from Karachi. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer
than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits
waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach.
Picture taken September 13, 2003. TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY
ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Zahid Hussein REUTERS

ZH/PB
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4JUG
September 13, 2003
Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
Pakistani labourers stand infront oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karachi September 13, 2003. Like a
gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower
is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for
destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture
taken September 13, 2003. TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT
SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

ZH/PB
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4JU7
September 13, 2003
Pakistani labourers use trolly to board oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING.
Pakistani labourers use trolly to board oil tanker Sea-Giant at Gaddani
shipbreaking yard, 60 km from Karach. Like a gigantic steel whale 10
stories high and longer than the Eiffel Tower is tall, the
second-biggest ship ever built sits waiting for destruction on what
could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach. Picture taken September 13,
2003. TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING
REUTERS/Zahid Hussein

ZH
ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING
RTR4JTX
September 13, 2003
Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from
Karachi. Like a gigantic steel whale...
Karachi, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT SHIPBREAKING.
Pakistani labourers work at Gaddani shipbreaking yard, 60 km from
Karachi. Like a gigantic steel whale 10 stories high and longer than
the Eiffel Tower is tall, the second-biggest ship ever built sits
waiting for destruction on what could be a beautiful Arabian Sea beach.
Picture taken September 13, 2003. TO BE USED WITH FEATURE STORY
ENVIRONMENT-SHIPBREAKING REUTERS/Zahid Hussein REUTERS

ZH/PB
CHINA
RTXJY1G
August 30, 2000
Decommissioned Russian aircraft carrier Kiev docks at Tianjin's Nanjiang Wharf August 29, 2000. China's...
Tianjin, China
Decommissioned Russian aircraft carrier Kiev docks at Tianjin's Nanjiang Wharf August 29, 2000. Chin.....
Decommissioned Russian aircraft carrier Kiev docks at Tianjin's Nanjiang Wharf August 29, 2000. China's Tianma Shipbreaking Company paid the Russian navy 70 million yuan ($8.4 million) for the Kiev, retired five years ago after 20 years of service. The 273 metre-long and 53 metre-wide aircraft carrier, arrived with its power, weapons and communication systems dismantled, will be disassembled and sold as scrap metal.
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