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Search results for: Accident-data-recorder

Spotlight
Spotlight
A History of Black Boxes - 27 Mar 2015
17 PICTURES
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYIT
March 26, 2015
A flight data recorder from an unknown public transport aircraft is seen in private aviation museum in...
Plzen, Czech Republic
A flight data recorder from an unknown public transport aircraft is seen in private aviation museum in...
A flight data recorder from an unknown public transport aircraft is seen in private aviation museum in the village of Zruc, near Plzen January 28, 2015. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken January 28, 2015 REUTERS/David W Cerny
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYII
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU holds a cockpit voice recorder, an up-to-date...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a cockpit voice recorder, an up-to-date model by L-3 Aviation Products that is used in Boeing and Airbus aircraft, at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYIG
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's BFU holds a L-3 Aviation Systems data recorder at their headquarters in Braunschweig...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a data recorder, an up-to-date model by L-3 Aviation Products that is used in Boeing and Airbus aircraft, at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYI6
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU holds a voice recorder, an up-to-date model...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a voice recorder, an up-to-date model by Honeywell that is used in Boeing and Airbus aircraft, at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYI3
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU holds a voice recorder, an up-to-date model...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a voice recorder, an up-to-date model by L-3 Aviation Products that is used in Boeing and Airbus aircraft, at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYI2
March 26, 2015
A historic tape-based and partly burned voice recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung...
Braunschweig, Germany
A historic tape-based and partly burned voice recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung...
A historic tape-based and partly burned voice recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYH2
March 26, 2015
A historic steel-foil-based data recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German...
Braunschweig, Germany
A historic steel-foil-based data recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU at...
A historic steel-foil-based data recorder is seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. On this model
the information is recorded and scratched onto a steel foil that is temperature-resistant. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYGK
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU holds a historic and partly burned tape-based...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a historic and partly burned tape-based voice recorder at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYGG
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a Russian-made historic tape-based voice recorder at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015 REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYGD
March 26, 2015
Solid-state data and voice recorders of different brands and models are seen at a storage of Germany's...
Braunschweig, Germany
Solid-state data and voice recorders of different models are seen at Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung...
Solid-state data and voice recorders of different brands and models are seen at a storage of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or 'black boxes', used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The 'deployable black boxes' combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYGA
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU holds a historic and partly burned tape-based...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) holds a historic and partly burned tape-based voice recorder at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYFN
March 26, 2015
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident...
Braunschweig, Germany
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU removes a flight recorder from a cupboard...
An employee of Germany's Bundesamt fuer Fluguntersuchung BFU (German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation) removes a solid state flight recorder from a cupboard at their headquarters in Braunschweig March 20, 2015. The task of the BFU is to investigate into accidents and serious incidents to civil aircraft in Germany, to determine the causes of the occurrences. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. Picture taken March 20, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FRANCE-CRASH/INVESTIGATION
RTR4UYEV
March 26, 2015
A combination picture showing the development of flight recorders or 'black boxes' since the 1950's....
London, United Kingdom
A combination picture showing the development of flight recorders or 'black boxes' since the 1950's.
A combination picture showing the development of flight recorders or 'black boxes' since the 1950's. Flight recorders or ?black boxes?, used in investigations of aviation catastrophes since the mid-20th century, have developed considerably over the years. While older recorders contained spools of magnetic tape, modern devices use crash-survivable digital chips. There have been increasing calls for commercial planes to be fitted with ejectable recorders that separate from the tail during a crash, technology already in use by military aircraft. The ?deployable black boxes? combine voice and data recordings and emit a distress signal to a global search and rescue satellite system. REUTERS/Staff
AirAsia Crash
AirAsia Crash
Black Boxes Found - 14 Jan 2015
18 PICTURES
INDONESIA-AIRPLANE/
RTR4L2WR
January 12, 2015
The flight data recorder from AirAsia QZ8501 is placed into a container at the National Transportation...
Jakarta, Indonesia
The flight data recorder from AirAsia QZ8501 is placed into a container at the National Transportation...
The flight data recorder from AirAsia QZ8501 is placed into a container at the National Transportation Safety Committee office in Jakarta January 12, 2015. Indonesian navy divers retrieved the black box flight data recorder from the wreck of the AirAsia passenger jet on Monday, a major step towards unravelling the cause of the crash that killed all 162 people on board. Flight QZ8501 lost contact with air traffic control in bad weather on Dec. 28, less than halfway into a two-hour flight from Indonesia's second-biggest city of Surabaya to Singapore. REUTERS/Beawiharta (INDONESIA - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT)
INDONESIA-AIRPLANE/
RTR4L2PH
January 12, 2015
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is lifted out of a carrying case at the airbase in Pangkalan...
Pangkalan Bun, Indonesia
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is lifted out of a carrying case at the airbase in Pangkalan...
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is lifted out of a carrying case at the airbase in Pangkalan Bun, Central Kalimantan January 12, 2015. Indonesian navy divers on Monday retrieved the black box flight data recorder from an AirAsia airliner that crashed two weeks ago, killing all 162 people on board, a government official said. Flight QZ8501 lost contact with air traffic control in bad weather on Dec. 28, less than halfway into a two-hour flight from Indonesia's second-biggest city of Surabaya to Singapore.
REUTERS/Adek Berry/Pool (INDONESIA - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT MILITARY)
INDONESIA-AIRPLANE/
RTR4L1C9
January 12, 2015
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is transferred to another container at the airbase in Pangkalan...
Pangkalan Bun, Indonesia
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is transferred to another container at the airbase in Pangkalan...
The flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 is transferred to another container at the airbase in Pangkalan Bun, Central Kalimantan January 12, 2015. Indonesian navy divers on Monday retrieved the black box flight data recorder from an AirAsia airliner that crashed two weeks ago, killing all 162 people on board, a government official said. Flight QZ8501 lost contact with air traffic control in bad weather on Dec. 28, less than halfway into a two-hour flight from Indonesia's second-biggest city of Surabaya to Singapore.
REUTERS/Darren Whiteside (INDONESIA - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT MILITARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
INDONESIA-AIRPLANE/
RTR4L1BM
January 12, 2015
Military policemen carry the flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 at the airbase in Pangkalan Bun,...
Pangkalan Bun, Indonesia
Military policemen carry the flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 at the airbase in Pangkalan Bun
Military policemen carry the flight data recorder of AirAsia QZ8501 at the airbase in Pangkalan Bun, Central Kalimantan January 12, 2015. Indonesian navy divers on Monday retrieved the black box flight data recorder from an AirAsia airliner that crashed two weeks ago, killing all 162 people on board, a government official said. Flight QZ8501 lost contact with air traffic control in bad weather on Dec. 28, less than halfway into a two-hour flight from Indonesia's second-biggest city of Surabaya to Singapore.
REUTERS/Darren Whiteside (INDONESIA - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT MILITARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
UKRAINE-CRISIS/
RTR3ZL68
July 22, 2014
A pro-Russian separatist shows members of the media a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight...
Donetsk, Ukraine
A pro-Russian separatist shows the media a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, before...
A pro-Russian separatist shows members of the media a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, before its handover to Malaysian representatives, in Donetsk July 22, 2014. The remains of some of the 298 victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over Ukraine were making their way to the Netherlands on Tuesday as Aleksander Borodai handed over the plane's black boxes to Malaysian experts. REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS TRANSPORT DISASTER CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NEPAL-AIRCRASH/
RTR321MR
May 14, 2012
A man carries the black box, retrieved from the plane crash site, in Kathmandu May 14, 2012. The Dornier...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A man carries the black box, retrieved from the plane crash site, in Kathmandu
A man carries the black box, retrieved from the plane crash site, in Kathmandu May 14, 2012. The Dornier aircraft owned by private Agni Air Company crashed while landing at a mountain airstrip in northwest Nepal on Monday, killing 15 people including 13 Indians, officials said. The plane was carrying 18 passengers and a crew of three on a flight from the resort town of Pokhara to Jomsom. Six survivors had been taken to a hospital in Pokhara and the condition of at least one of them is critical. It was not immediately clear what caused Monday's crash, according to news reports. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
CANADA/
RTR2Q7F3
August 22, 2011
The flight data recorder from First Air flight 6560 is removed by an official following a news conference...
Ottawa, Canada
The flight data recorder from First Air flight 6560 is removed by an official following a news conference...
The flight data recorder from First Air flight 6560 is removed by an official following a news conference at the Transportation Safety Board of Canada lab in Ottawa August 22, 2011. Twelve people were killed when a First Air jet crashed near Resolute Bay in the far north of the Canadian Arctic on August 20, but three people survived, local media reports. REUTERS/Chris Wattie (CANADA - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
RTR2MC6H
May 12, 2011
FRANCE-AIRLINER/BLACKBOXES - Map showing path and timeline of Air France flight 447's black boxes from...
FR, France
FRANCE-AIRLINER BLACKBOXES C
FRANCE-AIRLINER/BLACKBOXES - Map showing path and timeline of Air France flight 447's black boxes from recovery to their arrival in France Thursday for examination. RNGS. (TOR02) 10cm wide
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAOO
May 12, 2011
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which...
Le Bourget, France
The Cockpit Voice Recorder, one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed...
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009, is carrying to be displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAOM
May 12, 2011
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
Le Bourget, France
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAOK
May 12, 2011
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
Le Bourget, France
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAOE
May 12, 2011
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which...
Le Bourget, France
The Cockpit Voice Recorder, one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed...
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009, is displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAOB
May 12, 2011
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
Le Bourget, France
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed...
One of the two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009 is displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAO8
May 12, 2011
A gendarme carries the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air...
Le Bourget, France
The Cockpit Voice Recorder, one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed...
A gendarme carries the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009, to be displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
FRANCE-BRAZIL/BLACKBOXES
RTR2MAO5
May 12, 2011
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which...
Le Bourget, France
The Cockpit Voice Recorder, one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed...
The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), one of two flight recorders from the Rio-Paris Air France flight which crashed in 2009, is displayed for the media before a news conference at the BEA headquarters in Le Bourget, northern Paris, May 12, 2011. French air crash investigators said on Thursday it would take at least three days to extract information from recently retrieved flight recorders that could explain the Rio-Paris disaster almost two years ago. The investigators from France's BEA air accident inquiry agency showed media the skuffed cockpit voice and flight data recorders, recovered from the depths of the Atlantic nearly two weeks ago and shipped to France. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
BRITAIN/
RTR2GO3M
July 23, 2010
James Stillwell of L3 Communications holds a SVIVR Cockpit Voice and Flight Data Recorder at a display...
Farnborough, United Kingdom
James Stillwell of L3 Communications holds a SVIVR Cockpit Voice and Flight Data Recorder at a display...
James Stillwell of L3 Communications holds a SVIVR Cockpit Voice and Flight Data Recorder at a display stand at the Farnborough Airshow in Farnborough July 23, 2010. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS TECH)
CRASH-PLANE/
RTXBLK5
February 13, 2009
The flight data recorder from Thursday's crash of Continental Connection flight 3407 near Buffalo, New...
Washington, UNITED STATES
The flight data recorder from Thursday's crash of Continental Connection flight 3407 at NTSB headquarters...
The flight data recorder from Thursday's crash of Continental Connection flight 3407 near Buffalo, New York is displayed at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) headquarters in Washington, February 13, 2009.
Fifty people were killed when a commuter plane nosedived into a house in snowy western New York state and burst into flames that burned through the night. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES)
CRASH CHICAGO
RTR1AO5J
December 09, 2005
A television cameraman at the National Transportation Safety Board office films the cockpit voice recorder...
Washington, UNITED STATES
A television cameraman at the NTSB office films the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder...
A television cameraman at the National Transportation Safety Board office films the cockpit voice recorder (L) and the flight data recorder from the Southwest Airlines Flight 1248 accident, in Washington December 9, 2005. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
CRASH EGYPT
RTRAGH3
January 17, 2004
Egyptian officials hold the black box flight recorder on January 17, 2004 of a plane that crashed off...
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt - Arab Republic of
RECOVERY OF THE BLACK BOX OF A CRASHED PLANE IN SHARM EL SHEIKH.
Egyptian officials hold the black box flight recorder on January 17, 2004 of a plane that crashed off the coast of the Egyptian Red sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh. The black box was recovered in a joint operation between the French and Egyptian Navy experts. The Egyptian Boeing 737 crashed into the sea on January 3 killing all 148 people on board, 133 of whom were French tourists. REUTERS/Aladin Abdel Naby Pictures of the month January 2004 AN/CRB
SHANKSVILE
RTRMNC1
September 12, 2001
A large group of investigators comb the debris field for the fight data
recorders from United Airlines...
Shanksville, United States of America
A LARGE GROUP OF INVESTIGATORS COMB THE UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT 93
DEBRIS FIELD.
A large group of investigators comb the debris field for the fight data
recorders from United Airlines flight 93 near Shanksville, Pennsylvania
September 12, 2001. Flight 93 is one of four planes that were hijacked
as part of a deadly and destructive terrorist plot against the U.S.
September 11. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer

TMS
CRASH IVORYCOAST MEMORIAL
RTRDPH5
January 30, 2001
Joann Lindenmayer (L) of the United States comforts her adopted son, Sam, as a wreath is laid at sea...
Abidjan, UK
CRASH RELATIVES MOURN KENYA AIRWAYS DOOMED FLIGHT.
Joann Lindenmayer (L) of the United States comforts her adopted son, Sam, as a wreath is laid at sea to remember the vicitims of last year's Kenya Airways aircrash just offshore from the Ivory Coast on January 30, 2001. All but 10 of the 179 people on board were killed in the January 30, 2000 accident which remains unexplained since the in-flight data recorder was found to be faulty.

CLH/
BRITAIN CRASH
RTRRBUV
October 06, 1999
Twenty four hours after the West London train crash which killed at least 27 people, transport police...
London, UK
TRANSPORT POLICE SEARCH TRACKS AROUND TRAIN WRECKAGE.
Twenty four hours after the West London train crash which killed at least 27 people, transport police search the tracks around the wreckage for clues to the cause of the accident, October 6. Rescue workers are hoping that they can find one of the train's "black box" data recorders to establish whether it was mechanical or human failure which led to the collision.

HP/RUS/HB
SWISSAIR
RTXI1D5
September 12, 1998
The flight voice recorder, or "black box," sits in a cooler of water at the Transportation Safety Board...
The flight voice recorder, or "black box," sits in a cooler of water at the Transportation Safety .....
The flight voice recorder, or "black box," sits in a cooler of water at the Transportation Safety Board of Canada lab in Ottawa on September 12 after it was retrieved September 11 from the site of the crash of SwissAir flight 111. 229 people were killed when the plane crashed into Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia, on September 2. The data recorder didn't contain any information after the plane fell below 10,000 feet and investigators hope the voices and sounds in the cockpit will help them understand what caused the crash.
USA CRASH
RTXGNWJ
July 25, 1996
The flight data recorder from TWA flight 800 is displayed at NTSB headquarters July 25. The plane's "black...
The flight data recorder from TWA flight 800 is displayed at NTSB headquarters July 25. The plane's .....
The flight data recorder from TWA flight 800 is displayed at NTSB headquarters July 25. The plane's "black boxes," recovered late July 24, are in good condition according to the NTSB, and officials hope to have preliminary information from them later in the day.
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