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Search results for: Acinonyx-jubatus-jubatus

LIFE CHEETAHS
RTRMCKX 
February 04, 2005 
A 10-week-old cheetah cub bites at the tail of its mother Tumai, as four new cubs were shown for the... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
A Cheetah cub bites at its mothers tail during their first showing at Washington Zoo. 
A 10-week-old cheetah cub bites at the tail of its mother Tumai, as four new cubs were shown for the first time at Washington National Zoo February 4, 2005. The two male and two females are the first litter of cheetahs born at the National Zoo during its 115 year history and will go on public exhibit February 5. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE. REUTERS/Jason Reed JIR 
NAIROBI
RTRKAIV 
January 11, 2005 
Four cheetahs observe the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve, 240 km (150 miles) west of capital... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Four cheetah observe the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve. 
Four cheetahs observe the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve, 240 km (150 miles) west of capital Nairobi, January 11, 2005. The Maasai Mara is widely considered to be Africa's greatest wildlife reserve, it comprises 200 sq miles of open plains, woodlands and forest. The vast grassland plains are scattered with herds of zebra, giraffe, gazelle, and topi. Elephants and buffalo wallow in the wide Musiara Swamp and the Mara and Talek rivers are brimming with hippos and crocodile. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti RSS/AS 
NAIROBI
RTRKAIG 
January 11, 2005 
A cheetah looks over the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve, 240 km (150 miles) west of capital... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
A cheetah looks out over the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve. 
A cheetah looks over the plains in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve, 240 km (150 miles) west of capital Nairobi, January 11, 2005. The Maasai Mara is widely considered to be Africa's greatest wildlife reserve, it comprises 200 sq miles of open plains, woodlands and forest. The vast grassland plains are scattered with herds of zebra, giraffe, gazelle, and topi. Elephants and buffalo wallow in the wide Musiara Swamp and the Mara and Talek rivers are brimming with hippos and crocodile. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti RSS/AS 
AJOFRIN
RTRBI1I 
September 21, 2004 
Bagheera, a female cheetah, stands on a rock inside her large enclosure in the back yard of a house in... 
Ajofrin, Spain 
Cheetah "Bagheera" stands on a rock inside her enclosure in central Spain. 
Bagheera, a female cheetah, stands on a rock inside her large enclosure in the back yard of a house in Ajofrin, central Spain. Bagheera is the mother of Bunjee, a 12-week-old cheetah cub which is one of very few to have been born in captivity. Despite warnings they were likely to fail, a German couple that retired to Spain with hopes of breeding cheetahs, were succesful on their first attempt. Picture taken September 21, 2004. REUTERS/Paul Hanna NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE PH 
AJOFRIN
RTRBI0T 
September 21, 2004 
Bagheera, a female cheetah, stands on a rock inside her large enclosure in the back yard of a house in... 
Ajofrin, Spain 
Cheetah "Bagheera" stands on a rock inside her enclosure in central Spain. 
Bagheera, a female cheetah, stands on a rock inside her large enclosure in the back yard of a house in Ajofrin, central Spain. Bagheera is the mother of Bunjee, a 12-week-old cheetah cub which is one of very few to have been born in captivity. Despite warnings they were likely to fail, a German couple that retired to Spain with hopes of breeding cheetahs, were succesful on their first attempt. Picture taken September 21, 2004. REUTERS/Paul Hanna NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE PH 
AJOFRIN
RTRBHT9 
September 21, 2004 
Bunjee, a 12-week-old cheetah cub, rests on a rock while playing inside his large enclosure in Ajofrin,... 
Ajofrin, Spain 
Cheetah cub Bunjee sits on a rock in central Spain where it was born in captivity. 
Bunjee, a 12-week-old cheetah cub, rests on a rock while playing inside his large enclosure in Ajofrin, central Spain September 21, 2004. Bunjee is one of very few cheetah cubs to have been born in captivity. Despite warnings they were likely to fail, a German couple that retired to Spain with hopes of breeding cheetahs, were successful on their first attempt. Picture taken September 21, 2004. REUTERS/Paul Hanna NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE PH/ACM 
KENYA CHEETAH CUBS
RTR2E2W 
September 01, 2003 
A two week-old cheetah cub ventures out of its cage at the Nairobi Animal
Orphanage at the Kenya Wildlife... 
Nairobi, Kenya - Republic of 
A TWO-WEEK-OLD CHEETAH CUB LEAVES ITS CAGE AT THE NAIROBI ANIMAL
ORPHANAGE. 
A two week-old cheetah cub ventures out of its cage at the Nairobi Animal
Orphanage at the Kenya Wildlife Service headquarters September 1, 2003. This
cub, one of three cubs that were found wandering around without their
parents at Kenya's Tsavo East national park, is being cared for at the
centre. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Patrick Olum

PO/AS 
TURKEY CHEETAHS
RTR157N 
July 30, 2003 
Eight-year-old female cheetah Milly looks out of her cage in the Bosphorus
Zoo in Darica near Istanbul... 
Istanbul, Turkey - Republic of Turkey 
FEMALE CHEETAH MILLY LOOKS OUT OF HER CAGE IN BOSPHORUS ZOO IN
TURKEY. 
Eight-year-old female cheetah Milly looks out of her cage in the Bosphorus
Zoo in Darica near Istanbul July 30, 2003. Milly and her male companion
Norse, were brought to Bosphorus zoo from Switzerland's Jurassic Park.
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Fatih Saribas PP03070104

FS/AS 
TURKEY CHEETAHS
RTR157B 
July 30, 2003 
Cheetahs Norse and Milly play as they try to adapt to their new cage in the
Bosphorus Zoo in Darica... 
Istanbul, Turkey - Republic of Turkey 
NEW ARRIVAL CHEETAHS PLAY IN THEIR CAGE IN THE ZOO IN TURKEY. 
Cheetahs Norse and Milly play as they try to adapt to their new cage in the
Bosphorus Zoo in Darica near Istanbul July 30, 2003. Norse and Milly were
brought to Bosphorus zoo from Switzerland's Jurassic Park. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE
REUTERS/Fatih Saribas PP03070104

FS/AS 
RTR1577 
July 30, 2003 
Dr. Rainer Zangger, owner of Jurassic Park in Egerkinden, Switzerland, plays
with eight-year-old male... 
Turkey 
DR. ZANGGER PLAYS WITH A CHEETAH IN A ZOO IN TURKEY. 
Dr. Rainer Zangger, owner of Jurassic Park in Egerkinden, Switzerland, plays
with eight-year-old male cheetah Norse in his new cage in the Bosphorus
(Bogazici) zoo in Darica near Istanbul July 30, 2003. Two new cheetahs,
Norse and Milly, were brought to Bosphorus zoo from Switzerland's Jurassic
Park. Pictures of the month July 2003 REUTERS/Fatih Saribas PP03070104

FS 
TURKEY CHEETAHS
RTR13VS 
July 29, 2003 
Eight year-old female cheetah named Milly peers from behind a log while
resting in her cage after their... 
Istanbul, Turkey - Republic of Turkey 
CHEETAH MILLY PEERS FROM HER CAGE UPON ARRIVAL AT DARICA ZOO IN
TURKEY. 
Eight year-old female cheetah named Milly peers from behind a log while
resting in her cage after their arrival in Darica zoo near Istanbul from
Jurassic Park in Egerkinden of Switzerland July 29, 2003. Two cheetahs Milly
and Norse were brought to Darica Zoo and Botanic Park from Switzerland.
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Fatih Saribas PP03070104

FS 
TURKEY CHEETAHS
RTR13VO 
July 29, 2003 
Eight year-old male cheetah named Norse rests in his cage after arriving in
Darica zoo near Istanbul... 
Istanbul, Turkey - Republic of Turkey 
EIGHT-YEAR-OLD CHEETAH NORSE RESTS IN HIS CAGE IN DARICA ZOO. 
Eight year-old male cheetah named Norse rests in his cage after arriving in
Darica zoo near Istanbul from Jurassic Park in Egerkinden of Switzerland
July 29, 2003. Two cheetahs Milly and Norse were brought in to Darica Zoo
and Botanic Park from Switzerland. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Fatih Saribas
PP03070104

FS 
TURKEY CHEETAHS
RTR13V6 
July 29, 2003 
Eight-year-old male cheetah named Norse rests in his cage after arriving at
Darica zoo near Istanbul... 
Istanbul, Turkey - Republic of Turkey 
EIGHT-YEAR-OLD CHEETAH NORSE RESTS IN HIS CAGE IN DARICA ZOO. 
Eight-year-old male cheetah named Norse rests in his cage after arriving at
Darica zoo near Istanbul from Jurassic Park in Egerkinden, Switzerland July
29, 2003. Two cheetahs Milly and Norse were brought into Darica Zoo and
Botanic Park from the Swiss park. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Fatih Saribas
PP03070104

FS 
PXP05D
RTRPJP1 
June 19, 2003 
Six weeks old cheetah cubs are seen stands at the De Wildt Cheetah centre in
South Africa on June 19,2003.The... 
Johannesburg, South Africa - Republic of South Africa 
SIX WEEK OLD CHEETAH CUBS STANDS AT SUN AT THE DE WILDT
CHEETAH CENTRE. 
Six weeks old cheetah cubs are seen stands at the De Wildt Cheetah centre in
South Africa on June 19,2003.The centre has just launched a nationwide
census to find the number of the endangered big cats living wild in South
Africa. Using radio collars, cameras, aircraft and DNA testing, the survey
is the first comprehensive study of any country's population, says Ann van
Dyk, who started the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust 32 years ago. The
De Wildt centre is the only approved cheetah breeding centre in the world.
The census is expected to take between five and eight years to complete.
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya

JN/ 
RTRPJKO 
June 12, 2003 
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-CHEETAHS - Four two month old cheetah cubs are
seen resting in the shade... 
South Africa 
CHEETAH CUBS REST IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-CHEETAHS - Four two month old cheetah cubs are
seen resting in the shade at the De Wildt Cheetah centre in South Africa on
June 12, 2003. The centre has just launched a nationwide census to find the
number of the endangered big cats living wild in South Africa. Using radio
collars, cameras, aircraft and DNA testing, the survey is the first
comprehensive study of any country's population, says Ann van Dyk, who
started the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust 32 years ago. The De Wildt
centre is the only approved cheetah breeding centre in the world. The census
is expected to take between five and eight years to complete. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE
REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya

JN/GB 
RTRPJKJ 
June 12, 2003 
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-CHEETAHS - A mother cheetah yawns beside one of
her young cubs at the De... 
South Africa 
MOTHER CHEETAH YAWNS BESIDE CUB IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
TO MATCH FEATURE ENVIRONMENT-CHEETAHS - A mother cheetah yawns beside one of
her young cubs at the De Wildt Cheetah centre in South Africa June 12, 2003
which has just launched a nationwide census to find the number of the
endangered big cats living wild in South Africa. Using radio collars,
cameras, aircraft and DNA testing, the survey is the first comprehensive
study of any country's cheetah population, says Ann van Dyk, who started the
De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust 32 years ago. The De Wildt is the only
approved cheetah breeding centre in the world. The census is expected to
take between five and eight years to complete.Picture taken June 12, 2003.
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya

JN/WS 
SAFRICA CHEETAH
RTRP94H 
June 12, 2003 
A mother cheetah and three of her young cubs rest against a fence June 12,
2003 at the De Wildt Cheetah... 
Johannesburg, South Africa - Republic of South Africa 
A MOTHER CHEETAH AND THREE OF HER YOUNG CUBS AT THE DE WILDT
CHEETAH CENTRE IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
A mother cheetah and three of her young cubs rest against a fence June 12,
2003 at the De Wildt Cheetah centre in South Africa, which has just launched
a nationwide census to find the number of the endangered big cats living
wild in South Africa. Using radio collars, cameras, aircraft and DNA
testing, the survey is the first comprehensive study of any country's
population, says Ann van Dyk, who started the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife
Trust 32 years ago. The De Wildt is the only approved cheetah breeding
centre in the world. The census is expected to take between five and eight
years to complete. Picture taken June 12, 2003. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Juda
Ngwenya

JN/WS 
SAFRICA CHEETAH
RTRP93V 
June 12, 2003 
A mother cheetah yawns beside one of her young cubs at the De Wildt Cheetah
centre in South Africa June... 
Johannesburg, South Africa - Republic of South Africa 
A MOTHER CHEETAH AND ONE OF HER YOUNG CUBS AT THE DE WILDT
CHEETAH CENTRE IN SOUTH AFRICA. 
A mother cheetah yawns beside one of her young cubs at the De Wildt Cheetah
centre in South Africa June 12, 2003 which has just launched a nationwide
census to find the number of the endangered big cats living wild in South
Africa. Using radio collars, cameras, aircraft and DNA testing, the survey
is the first comprehensive study of any country's cheetah population, says
Ann van Dyk, who started the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust 32 years
ago. The De Wildt is the only approved cheetah breeding centre in the world.
The census is expected to take between five and eight years to
complete.Picture taken June 12, 2003. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya

JN/WS 
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