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Search results for: Ageing

ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
DAIMLER-AGM/PROTESTS
RTS3IGR6
July 08, 2020
An activist from the anti-globalisation organisation Attac wearing a costume protests in front of Mercedes-Benz...
Stuttgart, Germany
Activists protest in front of Mercedes-Benz Global Training Center in Stuttgart
An activist from the anti-globalisation organisation Attac wearing a costume protests in front of Mercedes-Benz Global Training Center as Daimler holds its virtual annual shareholders' meeting in Stuttgart, Germany, July 8, 2020. A sign reads: "Daimler AG restructure and disarm" REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
DAIMLER-AGM/PROTESTS
RTS3IGQZ
July 08, 2020
An activist from the anti-globalisation organisation Attac wearing a costume protests in front of Mercedes-Benz...
Stuttgart, Germany
Activists protest in front of Mercedes-Benz Global Training Center in Stuttgart
An activist from the anti-globalisation organisation Attac wearing a costume protests in front of Mercedes-Benz Global Training Center as Daimler holds its virtual annual shareholders' meeting in Stuttgart, Germany, July 8, 2020. A sign reads: "Daimler AG restructure and disarm" REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
PEOPLE-MORRICONE/
RTS3I9WO
July 07, 2020
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
Rome, Italy
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made by the artist Harry Greb in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
PEOPLE-MORRICONE/
RTS3I9WN
July 07, 2020
A man takes a picture of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of...
Rome, Italy
A man takes a picture of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of...
A man takes a picture of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made by the artist Harry Greb in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
PEOPLE-MORRICONE/
RTS3I9WM
July 07, 2020
A man takes a selfie in front of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the...
Rome, Italy
A man takes a selfie in front of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the...
A man takes a selfie in front of a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made by the artist Harry Greb in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
PEOPLE-MORRICONE/
RTS3I9KD
July 07, 2020
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
Rome, Italy
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made by the artist Harry Greb in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
PEOPLE-MORRICONE/
RTS3I9K6
July 07, 2020
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
Rome, Italy
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made...
A woman walks past a mural dedicated to Italian composer Ennio Morricone who died at the age of 91, made by the artist Harry Greb in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-REOPENING
RTS3HLVE
July 04, 2020
Flynn Williams aged 4 gets his haricut in a hairdressers during it's reopening, following the coronavirus...
Durham, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Durham
Flynn Williams aged 4 gets his haricut in a hairdressers during it's reopening, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Durham, Britain July 4, 2020. REUTERS/Lee Smith
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-REOPENING
RTS3HLVC
July 04, 2020
Flynn Williams aged 4 gets his haricut in a hairdressers during it's reopening, following the coronavirus...
Durham, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Durham
Flynn Williams aged 4 gets his haricut in a hairdressers during it's reopening, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Durham, Britain July 4, 2020. REUTERS/Lee Smith
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2KJ
July 01, 2020
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic...
Aschheim, Germany
The logo of Wirecard AG is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2KI
July 01, 2020
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic...
Aschheim, Germany
The logo of Wirecard AG is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2H0
July 01, 2020
People enter the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label...
Aschheim, Germany
People enter the headquarters of Wirecard AG in Aschheim
People enter the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, in Aschheim near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2GV
July 01, 2020
A woman enters the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label...
Aschheim, Germany
A woman enters the headquarters of Wirecard AG in Aschheim
A woman enters the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2AM
July 01, 2020
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic...
Aschheim, Germany
The logo of Wirecard AG is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2AL
July 01, 2020
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label...
Aschheim, Germany
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG in Aschheim
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2AH
July 01, 2020
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label...
Aschheim, Germany
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG in Aschheim
A cameraman films the headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
WIRECARD-ACCOUNTS/
RTS3H2AA
July 01, 2020
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic...
Aschheim, Germany
The logo of Wirecard AG is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim
The logo of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions, is pictured at its headquarters in Aschheim, near Munich, Germany, July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
RUSSIA-PUTIN/VOTE-GENERATION P
RTS3GMG3
June 29, 2020
Nikita Vinogradov, a 22-year-old student and activist of the Young Guard of United Russia movement, poses...
Moscow, Russia
Student and activist Nikita Vinogradov poses for a picture in Moscow
Nikita Vinogradov, a 22-year-old student and activist of the Young Guard of United Russia movement, poses for a picture on the street during a seven-day nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in Moscow, Russia June 25, 2020. Picture taken June 25, 2020. REUTERS/Tatiana Gomozova REFILE - CORRECTING AGE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CASES-INDIA
RTS3GKVI
June 29, 2020
An aged man reacts as a medical worker collects a sample from him at a centre to conduct tests for the...
New Delhi, India
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New Delhi
An aged man reacts as a medical worker collects a sample from him at a centre to conduct tests for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), amidst its spread in New Delhi, India, June 29, 2020. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Life in the age of coronavirus
217 PICTURES
SOCCER-ENGLAND-TOT-MUN/REPORT
RTS3EJF4
June 19, 2020
Soccer Football - Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - Tottenham Hotspur Stadium,...
London, United Kingdom
Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United
Soccer Football - Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, London, Britain - June 19, 2020 Tottenham fan Joyce (aged 87) outside the stadium during the match, as play resumes behind closed doors following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
SOCCER-ENGLAND-TOT-MUN/REPORT
RTS3EJF6
June 19, 2020
Soccer Football - Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - Tottenham Hotspur Stadium,...
London, United Kingdom
Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United
Soccer Football - Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, London, Britain - June 19, 2020 Tottenham fan Joyce (aged 87) with a figurine of Tottenham Hotspur's Son Heung-min outside the stadium during the match, as play resumes behind closed doors following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
Wider Image
Wider Image
'Hospitals are too risky': home birth in Mexico City
24 PICTURES
Spotlight
Spotlight
Children toil alongside parents at Burkina Faso quarry pit
20 PICTURES
GERMANY-POLITICS/TELECOMMUNICATION
RTS3DLZ1
June 16, 2020
Markus Haas, Chief Executive Officer at Telefonica Deutschland Holding AG, poses with German Transport...
Berlin, Germany
News conference on the mobile communication summit in Berlin
Markus Haas, Chief Executive Officer at Telefonica Deutschland Holding AG, poses with German Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer (R) at the end of a news conference on the mobile communication summit in Berlin, Germany June 16, 2020. John Macdougall/Pool via REUTERS
GERMANY-POLITICS/TELECOMMUNICATION
RTS3DLSK
June 16, 2020
Markus Haas, Chief Executive Officer at Telefonica Deutschland Holding AG, speaks during a news conference...
Berlin, Germany
News conference on the mobile communication summit in Berlin
Markus Haas, Chief Executive Officer at Telefonica Deutschland Holding AG, speaks during a news conference on the mobile communication summit in Berlin, Germany June 16, 2020. John Macdougall/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-APP
RTS3DK7H
June 16, 2020
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG,...
Berlin, Germany
Germany to launch coronavirus smartphone contact tracing app
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG, holds a mobile phone as he attends the presentation of the new contact-tracing smartphone app that will use Bluetooth short-range radio and technology standards from Apple and Google to alert people of the risk of infection with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-APP
RTS3DK76
June 16, 2020
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG,...
Berlin, Germany
Germany to launch coronavirus smartphone contact tracing app
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG, holds a mobile phone as he attends the presentation of the new contact-tracing smartphone app that will use Bluetooth short-range radio and technology standards from Apple and Google to alert people of the risk of infection with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-APP
RTS3DK6Q
June 16, 2020
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG,...
Berlin, Germany
Germany to launch coronavirus smartphone contact tracing app
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG, holds a mobile phone as he attends the presentation of the new contact-tracing smartphone app that will use Bluetooth short-range radio and technology standards from Apple and Google to alert people of the risk of infection with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-APP
RTS3DJPZ
June 16, 2020
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG,...
Berlin, Germany
Germany to launch coronavirus smartphone contact tracing app
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG, speaks during the presentation of the new contact-tracing smartphone app that will use Bluetooth short-range radio and technology standards from Apple and Google to alert people of the risk of infection with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-APP
RTS3DJOY
June 16, 2020
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG,...
Berlin, Germany
Germany to launch coronavirus smartphone contact tracing app
Timotheus Hoettges, Chief Executive Officer of Germany's telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom AG, speaks during the presentation of the new contact-tracing smartphone app that will use Bluetooth short-range radio and technology standards from Apple and Google to alert people of the risk of infection with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13S
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13R
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13Q
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13O
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13N
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13M
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13A
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C139
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ENGLAND-SOCCER
RTS3C13C
June 09, 2020
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley,...
Hertford, United Kingdom
A Southend academy player trains in Hertford
Southend academy player Jake, aged 11, has a one on one training session with football coach Mark Bentley, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hertford, Britain, June 9, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-BIRMINGHAM
RTS3BJ7R
June 07, 2020
People of all ages gather on the grass at Shain Park to protest against racial inequality in the aftermath...
Birmingham, UNITED STATES
Protesters rally in Detroit against the death of George Floyd
People of all ages gather on the grass at Shain Park to protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd at a rally in Birmingham, Michigan, U.S., June 7, 2020. REUTERS/Emily Elconin
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/
RTS3A7AA
June 02, 2020
George Floyd's daughter, Gianna Floyd, age 6, is seen during a press conference at Minneapolis City Hall...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
George Floyd's daughter, Gianna Floyd, age 6, is seen during a press conference at Minneapolis City Hall...
George Floyd's daughter, Gianna Floyd, age 6, is seen during a press conference at Minneapolis City Hall following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. June 2, 2020. REUTERS/Nicholas Pfosi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-CHINA
RTS39IGG
May 29, 2020
Karin Wasowski (R), controller at German car manufacturer Volkswagen AG is hugged by a friend before...
Frankfurt, Germany
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Frankfurt
Karin Wasowski (R), controller at German car manufacturer Volkswagen AG is hugged by a friend before she boards the first Lufthansa charter flight for Tianjin, China, after the lockdown, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, May 29, 2020. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-CHINA
RTS39IFP
May 29, 2020
Karin Wasowski (R), controller at German car manufacturer Volkswagen AG talks to the media before she...
Frankfurt, Germany
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Frankfurt
Karin Wasowski (R), controller at German car manufacturer Volkswagen AG talks to the media before she boards the first Lufthansa charter flight for Tianjin, after the lock down at the airport as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues. in Frankfurt, Germany, May 29, 2020. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
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