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Search results for: Alternative-medicine

VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAV
June 19, 2019
Venezuelan migrant Iris Mejias, 68, poses for a picture with her granddaughter Victoria, 10, while they...
Tumbes, Peru
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate
Venezuelan migrant Iris Mejias, 68, poses for a picture with her granddaughter Victoria, 10, while they rest at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service centre, before continuing their journey to Lima, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 15, 2019. Mejias, a nurse with more than 40 years of professional experience, was diagnosed with cancer a few months after her daughter and son-in-law left Venezuela to go to work in Peru, leaving their children under her care. "After having surgery, I have not been able to get chemotherapy because we do not have access to medicines." "I am disappointed that my old age has been stolen. I have worked for over 40 years, but today my salary and pension is not enough to buy food for a week". "I'm doing this trip to bring Victoria to her mother because how would a ten-year-old girl cope when her grandmother, who has been like her mother, dies and suddenly she has no one. How could I leave this girl in limbo?". "I am forced to leave. I have no alternative." Victoria's two older siblings stayed in Venezuela and are completing their studies. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "MOTHERS REFUGEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GLOBAL-PHARMA/
RTS1T66W
May 25, 2018
Plants used in traditional medicines are seen on sale at a market in Durban, South Africa, May 25, 2018....
Durban, South Africa
Plants used in traditional medicines are seen on sale at a market in Durban
Plants used in traditional medicines are seen on sale at a market in Durban, South Africa, May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Rogan Ward
GLOBAL-PHARMA/
RTS1SN6O
May 22, 2018
Traditional medicines cook at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam May 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kham...
Hanoi, Vietnam
Traditional medicines cook at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi
Traditional medicines cook at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam May 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kham
GLOBAL-PHARMA/
RTS1SN51
May 22, 2018
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam...
Hanoi, Vietnam
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam May 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kham
GLOBAL-PHARMA/
RTS1SN4Z
May 22, 2018
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam...
Hanoi, Vietnam
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi
Boxes containing traditional medicines are seen at Khuong Vien traditional medical shop in Hanoi, Vietnam May 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kham
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YO06
January 12, 2017
A worker at herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
Worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo
A worker at herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNZD
January 12, 2017
Customers buy natural herbal drugs, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017....
Cairo, Egypt
Customers buy natural herbal drugs
Customers buy natural herbal drugs, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNYX
January 12, 2017
Customers shop for consumer goods as rice, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
Customers shop for consumer goods as rice, in Cairo
Customers shop for consumer goods as rice, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNWJ
January 12, 2017
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt...
Cairo, Egypt
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug, in Cairo
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNWG
January 12, 2017
A worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug, in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
A worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug, in Cairo
A worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNTO
January 12, 2017
A worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
Worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo
A worker at herbal store takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNSE
January 12, 2017
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at a herbal store, in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at a herbal store, in Cairo
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at a herbal store, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNQ1
January 12, 2017
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at herbal store, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017....
Cairo, Egypt
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at herbal store, in Cairo
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods at herbal store, in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNNE
January 12, 2017
A herbal store worker takes ingredients to prepare a natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
A herbal store worker takes ingredients to prepare a natural herbal drug in Cairo
A herbal store worker takes ingredients to prepare a natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YNND
January 12, 2017
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods from a herbal store in Cairo, Egypt January 10,...
Cairo, Egypt
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods from a herbal store in Cairo
Customers buy natural herbal drugs and consumer goods from a herbal store in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
EGYPT-ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
RTX2YMQP
January 12, 2017
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt...
Cairo, Egypt
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo
Samy Al Aatar, owner of a herbal store, takes ingredients to prepare natural herbal drug in Cairo, Egypt January 10, 2017. Picture taken January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC87
November 01, 2016
Congealed blood is seen on patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, at clinic...
Zarqa, Jordan
Congealed blood is seen on patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session in the city of Zarqa...
Congealed blood is seen on patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, at clinic of Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7Y
November 01, 2016
Patients wait inside at clinic of Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative...
Zarqa, Jordan
Patients wait inside at clinic of Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative...
Patients wait inside at clinic of Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, for a cupping session, or Hijama, inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7X
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, wears gloves before...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, wears gloves before...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, wears gloves before a cupping treatment session, or Hijama, for his patient Khalil Al Zuban inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7V
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, suctions the congealed...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, puts the cups on his...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, suctions the congealed blood from his patient Abu Alaa's leg during a cupping session, or Hijama, inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7T
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, puts the cups on his...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, puts the cups on his...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, puts the cups on his patient Abu Alaa's leg during a cupping session, or Hijama, inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7R
November 01, 2016
Congealed blood is seen on the patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, at...
Zarqa, Jordan
Congealed blood is seen on patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, in the...
Congealed blood is seen on the patient Khalil Al Zuban's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, at clinic of Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7Q
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, removes the congealed...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, removes the congealed...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, removes the congealed blood on a patient's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7O
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, poses inside his clinic...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, poses inside his clinic...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, poses inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
JORDAN-MEDICINE/
RTX2RC7M
November 01, 2016
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor and specialized in alternative medicine, uses a blade on a...
Zarqa, Jordan
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor specializing in alternative medicine, uses a blade on a patient's...
Yaseen Khdayrat, a general medicine doctor and specialized in alternative medicine, uses a blade on a patient's back during a cupping session, or Hijama, inside his clinic in the city of Zarqa, Jordan, October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MAD
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian beekeeper uses smoke to calm bees in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah,...
Rafah, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian beekeeper uses smoke to calm bees in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MAA
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian beekeeper carries a honeycomb in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in...
Rafah, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian beekeeper carries a honeycomb in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MA8
April 12, 2016
Palestinian beekeepers ride a rickshaw motorbike loaded with honeycombs as they make their way to collect...
Rafah, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
Palestinian beekeepers ride a rickshaw motorbike loaded with honeycombs as they make their way to collect honey at a store in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MA6
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian man, who suffers from shoulder pains, receives bee -sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian man, who suffers from shoulder pains, receives bee -sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MA5
April 12, 2016
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MA4
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian boy, who suffers from alopecia areata, waits to receive bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian boy, who suffers from alopecia areata, waits to receive bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29MA0
April 12, 2016
Palestinian agricultural engineer Rateb Samour (L), who treats people with bee-sting therapy, speaks...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
Palestinian agricultural engineer Rateb Samour (L), who treats people with bee-sting therapy, speaks with patients at his clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29M9Y
April 12, 2016
Palestinian beekeepers move beehives in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern...
Rafah, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
Palestinian beekeepers move beehives in the process of collecting honey at a farm in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29M9W
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian beekeeper pours freshly collected honey into a container at a store in Rafah, in the southern...
Rafah, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian beekeeper pours freshly collected honey into a container at a store in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip April 11, 2016. Rateb Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29M9V
April 12, 2016
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
Palestinian girl Alya Al-Ghafari, who suffers from facial palsy, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/BEE-THERAPY
RTX29M9T
April 12, 2016
A Palestinian patient, who suffers from nerve problems in his neck and back, receives bee-sting therapy...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Bee-sting therapy
A Palestinian patient, who suffers from nerve problems in his neck and back, receives bee-sting therapy at Rateb Samour's clinic in Gaza City April 11, 2016. Samour sees 250 patients a day, whose complaints range from hair loss to cerebral palsy and cancer. He is not a doctor and has never worked in a hospital. Samour inherited the skill of bee-sting therapy from his father. From 2003 the agricultural engineer dedicated all his time to study and develop the alternative-medicine treatment of apitherapy, which uses bee-related products from honey, propolis - or bee glue used to build hives - to venom. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem SEARCH "GAZA BEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF98
October 27, 2015
Prisoner Roque Pereira, 65, is covered in clay during a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme,...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoner Roque Pereira, 65, is covered in clay during a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 28, 2015. According to ACUDA, prisoners spend most of their hours in dank, dark cells and the clay therapy is designed to improve their skin. It is part of an alternative therapy programme the charity uses to address the physical and emotional needs of inmates. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 19 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF97
October 27, 2015
Prisoners (L-R) Raimundo Souza, 24, Jairo Caracara, 38 and Tiago Kinkas, 23, march during a therapy session...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoners (L-R) Raimundo Souza, 24, Jairo Caracara, 38 and Tiago Kinkas, 23, march during a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 28, 2015. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 20 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF92
October 27, 2015
Prisoners Helio Steves (L), 57, and Epifacio Soares, 62, are covered in clay by fellow inmates during...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoners Helio Steves (L), 57, and Epifacio Soares, 62, are covered in clay by fellow inmates during a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 28, 2015. According to ACUDA, prisoners spend most of their hours in dank, dark cells and the clay therapy is designed to improve their skin. It is part of an alternative therapy programme the charity uses to address the physical and emotional needs of inmates. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 18 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF8U
October 27, 2015
Prisoners stand by plates of clay before a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoners stand by plates of clay before a therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 28, 2015. According to ACUDA, prisoners can spend most of their hours in dank, dark cells and the clay therapy is designed to improve their skin. It is part of an alternative therapy programme the charity uses to address the physical and emotional needs of inmates. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 17 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF8T
October 27, 2015
Prisoners Sergio Luiz Brito Aponte (L), 38, and Alexandre Valente, 31, embrace while taking part in a...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoners Sergio Luiz Brito Aponte (L), 38, and Alexandre Valente, 31, embrace while taking part in a Family Constellations therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 27, 2015. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 16 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF8Q
October 27, 2015
Psychologist Maria Junquera (2nd L) conducts a Family Constellations therapy session with prisoners Sergio...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Psychologist Maria Junquera (2nd L) conducts a Family Constellations therapy session with prisoners Sergio Luiz Brito Aponte (L), 38, and Alexandre Valente, 31 (2nd R) as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 27, 2015. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 15 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF85
October 27, 2015
An occupational therapist (back) conducts an Ayurvedic massage on prisoner Anderson Miranda, 33, as part...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
An occupational therapist (back) conducts an Ayurvedic massage on prisoner Anderson Miranda, 33, as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 27, 2015. Ayurveda is an ancient Hindu system of holistic healing. The massage is taught to the prisoners to help them understand the human body and engender a greater sense of compassion for others, according to ACUDA. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 11 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF7V
October 27, 2015
Prisoners do yoga stretches and breathing exercises after a half-day visit by their families as part...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Prisoners do yoga stretches and breathing exercises after a half-day visit by their families as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 28, 2015. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 13 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF7T
October 27, 2015
An inmate (L) tends to a fellow prisoner while performing ear candling during an alternative therapy...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
An inmate (L) tends to a fellow prisoner while performing ear candling during an alternative therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 27, 2015. Ear candling, which involves inserting a hollow cone-shaped device into the ear canal and lighting the exposed end, is believed by practitioners to draw out earwax. According to ACUDA the therapy is beneficial for the inmates' emotional health. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 9 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF7R
October 27, 2015
Inmates administer ear candling therapy to fellow prisoners during an alternative therapy session as...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
Inmates administer ear candling therapy to fellow prisoners during an alternative therapy session as part of the ACUDA programme, at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 27, 2015. Ear candling, which involves inserting a hollow cone-shaped device into the ear canal and lighting the exposed end, is believed by practitioners to draw out earwax. According to ACUDA the therapy is beneficial for the inmates' emotional health. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 8 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
BRAZIL-PRISON/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1TF7P
October 27, 2015
An inmate conducts an Ayurvedic massage on a fellow prisoner as part of the ACUDA programme at a complex...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil's Prisons - A Life Beyond Crime
An inmate conducts an Ayurvedic massage on a fellow prisoner as part of the ACUDA programme at a complex of ten prisons in Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 27, 2015. Ayurveda is an ancient Hindu system of holistic healing. The massage is taught to the prisoners to help them understand the human body and engender a greater sense of compassion for others, according to ACUDA. Down a dirt road in the Amazonian state of Rondonia, prisoners convicted of murder, theft and other crimes get a rare release from the day-to-day hardships of a penal system known for violence and overcrowding. ACUDA (Association for the Cultural Development of Prisoners), a local charity in the capital city of Porto Velho, trains detainees in spiritual and physical healing practices such as Ayurvedic massage as well as in vocational skills including car mechanics and gardening. The therapies have one goal, says Luiz Carlos Marques, the charity's founder - educating inmates about the possibilities of life beyond crime. REUTERS/Nacho Doce PICTURE 10 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "BRAZIL'S PRISONS - A LIFE BEYOND CRIME" SEARCH "ACUDA" FOR ALL IMAGES
US-TRADE/TPP
RTS2HE4
September 30, 2015
Director of Public Citizen's Global Access to Medicine, Peter Maybarduk speaks during a protest outside...
Atlanta, UNITED STATES
Maybarduk speaks during a protest outside the hotel where the Trans-Pacific Partnership Ministerial Meetings...
Director of Public Citizen's Global Access to Medicine, Peter Maybarduk speaks during a protest outside the hotel where the Trans-Pacific Partnership Ministerial Meetings are being held in Atlanta, Georgia, September 30, 2015. The TPP trade pact that is being negotiated this week should not expand to drug monopolies that deny people life-saving and less expensive alternative drugs, the protestors said. REUTERS/Tami Chappell
CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS
RTX1RYKH
September 23, 2015
An employee works at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's...
Shanghai, China
An employee works at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai
An employee works at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's much-hyped market for vitamins and supplements is facing a steep challenge from traditional remedies from ginseng to deer antler, even as the sector's rise fuels billion-dollar deals and share price surges. The vitamins market is set to expand five percent a year to $20 billion in 2019, half its pace of growth since 2009. It's being outstripped by a traditional medicine business that could be worth $40 billion by then - and is growing twice as fast. Picture taken September 16, 2015. To match CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS REUTERS/Aly Song
CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS
RTX1RYKC
September 23, 2015
Traditional Chinese medicine is seen in a shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's much-hyped...
Shanghai, China
Traditional Chinese medicine is seen in a shop in Shanghai
Traditional Chinese medicine is seen in a shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's much-hyped market for vitamins and supplements is facing a steep challenge from traditional remedies from ginseng to deer antler, even as the sector's rise fuels billion-dollar deals and share price surges. The vitamins market is set to expand five percent a year to $20 billion in 2019, half its pace of growth since 2009. It's being outstripped by a traditional medicine business that could be worth $40 billion by then - and is growing twice as fast. Picture taken September 16, 2015. To match CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS REUTERS/Aly Song
CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS
RTX1RYK8
September 23, 2015
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's...
Shanghai, China
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's much-hyped market for vitamins and supplements is facing a steep challenge from traditional remedies from ginseng to deer antler, even as the sector's rise fuels billion-dollar deals and share price surges. The vitamins market is set to expand five percent a year to $20 billion in 2019, half its pace of growth since 2009. It's being outstripped by a traditional medicine business that could be worth $40 billion by then - and is growing twice as fast. Picture taken September 16, 2015. To match CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS REUTERS/Aly Song
CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS
RTX1RYJV
September 23, 2015
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's...
Shanghai, China
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai
Employees work at a traditional Chinese medicine shop in Shanghai, China, September 16, 2015. China's much-hyped market for vitamins and supplements is facing a steep challenge from traditional remedies from ginseng to deer antler, even as the sector's rise fuels billion-dollar deals and share price surges. The vitamins market is set to expand five percent a year to $20 billion in 2019, half its pace of growth since 2009. It's being outstripped by a traditional medicine business that could be worth $40 billion by then - and is growing twice as fast. Picture taken September 16, 2015. To match CHINA-HEALTHCARE/VITAMINS REUTERS/Aly Song TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EGYPT-HEALTH/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1PUSN
August 27, 2015
Patients drink herbal tea inside a tent used as a sauna as they relax after their sand bath in Siwa,...
Siwa, Egypt
Wider Image: The Hot Sand Baths of Siwa
Patients drink herbal tea inside a tent used as a sauna as they relax after their sand bath in Siwa, Egypt, August 17, 2015. In the searing heat of summer in western Egypt, at the hottest time of the day, sufferers of rheumatism, joint pain, infertility or impotence lie buried neck-deep in the sand of Siwa near Dakrour Mountain. Locals say taking a sand bath is a natural therapy with powers to cure many medical conditions. Patients relax in the shade before treatment, which includes massages by the feet of health workers after they submerge their patients up to their neck in the desert. Patients drink mint tea in tents following the treatment. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih PICTURE 17 OF 24 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "THE HOT SAND BATHS OF SIWA". SEARCH "ASMAA SIWA" FOR ALL IMAGES
Animals
Animals
Alternative Medicine
14 PICTURES
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFZ7
July 30, 2015
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The...
Brasilia, Brazil
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFZ5
July 30, 2015
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The...
Brasilia, Brazil
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFZ2
July 30, 2015
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The...
Brasilia, Brazil
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFYX
July 30, 2015
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The...
Brasilia, Brazil
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo
A Perdiz receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFY5
July 30, 2015
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in...
Brasilia, Brazil
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in...
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFXY
July 30, 2015
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in...
Brasilia, Brazil
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in...
A blue-throated macaw receives acupuncture and laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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