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Search results for: Amazonian-tribes

PERU-OIL/INDIGENOUS
RTS1CUJT
August 22, 2017
Chiefs of Amazonian tribes, Emerson Sandi, Alfonso Lopez, Aurelio Chino and Carlos Sandi attend a news...
Lima, Peru
Chiefs of Amazonian tribes, Emerson Sandi, Alfonso Lopez, Aurelio Chino and Carlos Sandi attend a news...
Chiefs of Amazonian tribes, Emerson Sandi, Alfonso Lopez, Aurelio Chino and Carlos Sandi attend a news conference with the foreign media in Lima, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
COLOMBIA-PROTEST/
RTS16FAH
May 12, 2017
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as...
Corinto, Colombia
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as...
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as their ancestral lands in Corinto, Colombia, May 11, 2017. Picture taken May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Federico Rios
COLOMBIA-PROTEST/
RTS16FA5
May 12, 2017
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as...
Corinto, Colombia
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as...
Ceremonial staffs of leaders of the Nasa indigenous tribe are seen at a sugar cane field they claim as their ancestral lands in Corinto, Colombia, May 11, 2017. Picture taken May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Federico Rios
HEALTH-MENTAL/COLOMBIA
RTS2EW4
September 30, 2015
A Colombian Nukak Maku Indian boy gestures in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare...
San Jose Del Guaviare, Colombia
Colombian Nukak Maku Indian boy gestures in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare
A Colombian Nukak Maku Indian boy gestures in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare of Guaviare province September 3, 2015. Since emerging from the jungle in 2005, half naked and carrying blowpipes, the Nukak have lived in settlements near the frontier town of San Jose del Guaviare, a humid outpost in the Amazon 400 km (250 miles) southeast of the capital Bogota. Picture taken September 3, 2015. To match Feature HEALTH-MENTAL/COLOMBIA REUTERS/John Vizcaino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-MENTAL/COLOMBIA
RTS2EVZ
September 30, 2015
A Colombian Nukak Maku Indian child rests in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare...
San Jose Del Guaviare, Colombia
Colombian Nukak Maku Indian child rests in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare
A Colombian Nukak Maku Indian child rests in a refugee camp at Agua Bonita near San Jose del Guaviare of Guaviare province September 3, 2015. Since emerging from the jungle in 2005, half naked and carrying blowpipes, the Nukak have lived in settlements near the frontier town of San Jose del Guaviare, a humid outpost in the Amazon 400 km (250 miles) southeast of the capital Bogota. Picture taken September 3, 2015. To match Feature HEALTH-MENTAL/COLOMBIA REUTERS/John Vizcaino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6SS
August 13, 2015
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs...
Lima, Peru
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a media release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6RY
August 13, 2015
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs...
Lima, Peru
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a media release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6RT
August 13, 2015
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs...
Lima, Peru
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a media release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6RH
August 13, 2015
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs...
Lima, Peru
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima
Chiefs of indigenous communities of the Amazonas attend a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a media release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6RA
August 13, 2015
Carlos Sandi, president of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin, speaks during a news...
Lima, Peru
President of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin Sandi speaks during a news conference...
Carlos Sandi, president of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin, speaks during a news conference in Lima August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a media release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
PERU-POLITICS/
RTX1O6Q4
August 13, 2015
Carlos Sandi, (R) President of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin, accompanied by other...
Lima, Peru
Carlos Sandi, President of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin, accompanied by other...
Carlos Sandi, (R) President of Amazon's native communities of the Corrientes basin, accompanied by other leaders, speaks during a news conference in Lima, August 13, 2015. Chiefs of indigenous communities near Peru’s biggest oil field, block 192, are pressing for better benefits and environmental monitoring as the government negotiates a new contract with energy companies, according to a press release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
BRAZIL-INDIANS/
RTR4XCN8
April 14, 2015
Raoni Metuktire, a leader of the Brazilian indigenous ethnic Kayapo people, reacts at a news conference...
Brasilia, Brazil
Metuktire, a leader of the Brazilian indigenous ethnic Kayapo people, reacts at a news conference before...
Raoni Metuktire, a leader of the Brazilian indigenous ethnic Kayapo people, reacts at a news conference before a protest during the National Indigenous Mobilization at the Esplanade of Ministries in Brasilia April 14, 2015. Organizers of the mobilization aim to discuss issues of land demarcation and indigenous rights with authorities. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
URUGUAY-RELIGION/
RTR4NZGP
February 03, 2015
Devotees of the Afro-Brazilian goddess of the sea Iemanja pay tribute on Iemanja's Day at Ramirez beach...
Montevideo, Uruguay
Devotees of the Afro-Brazilian goddess of the sea Iemanja pay tribute on Iemanja's Day at Ramirez beach...
Devotees of the Afro-Brazilian goddess of the sea Iemanja pay tribute on Iemanja's Day at Ramirez beach in Montevideo February 2, 2015. On this day every year, worshippers light candles at a shrine and throw sweets, alcoholic drinks, fruits and cheap jewellery into the sea as offerings to ask for good health and luck in love and work. REUTERS/Jorge Adorno (URUGUAY - Tags: RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-SPORTS/
RTR45G5E
September 09, 2014
Kayapo Indians take paddle board lessons during a break in the fourth edition of the Traditional Indian...
MARAPANIM, Brazil
Kayapo Indians take paddle board lessons during a break in the fourth edition of the Traditional Indian...
Kayapo Indians take paddle board lessons during a break in the fourth edition of the Traditional Indian Games of Para, held on Maruda Beach in Marapanim, September 6, 2014. Native Brazilians from 15 different tribes are participating in the event that features traditional sports and runs through September 10. Picture taken September 6, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS
RTX1RSIK
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VRWL
June 25, 2014
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCCER SPORT WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VRV7
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe walks past goal posts in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River)...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe walks past goal posts in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River)...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe walks past goal posts in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCCER SPORT WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VRUQ
June 25, 2014

Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...

Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY TRAVEL)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VRSV
June 25, 2014
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY SOCCER SPORT TRAVEL WORLD CUP)
World Cup 2014
World Cup 2014
Business Booms for Amazon Tribe - 26 Jun 2014
14 PICTURES
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ4X
June 25, 2014
Tourists look at crafts made by members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro...
Manaus, Brazil
Tourists look at crafts made by members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro...
Tourists look at crafts made by members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ4I
June 25, 2014
A girl of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe poses while waiting to sell crafts to tourists in her village in...
Manaus, Brazil
A girl of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe poses while waiting to sell crafts to tourists in her village in...
A girl of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe poses while waiting to sell crafts to tourists in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ3P
June 25, 2014
Children of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near...
Manaus, Brazil
Children of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near...
Children of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ3D
June 25, 2014
A member of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe plays music in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe look on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near of Manaus...
A member of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe plays music in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ0U
June 25, 2014
Crafts made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe are displayed in their village in the Rio Negro (Black...
Manaus, Brazil
Crafts made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe are displayed in their village in the Rio Negro near...
Crafts made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe are displayed in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ0D
June 25, 2014
Crafts, including one depicting World Cup mascot Fuleco the Armadillo (R), made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo...
Manaus, Brazil
Crafts made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe are displayed in their village in the Rio Negro near...
Crafts, including one depicting World Cup mascot Fuleco the Armadillo (R), made by members of the AmazonianTatuyo tribe are displayed in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VQ09
June 25, 2014
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio...
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VPZS
June 25, 2014
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio...
Members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe look on as tourists arrive by boat to their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VPZK
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on as tourists arrive in a boat to her village in the Rio...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on as tourists arrive in a boat to her village in the Rio...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on as tourists arrive in a boat to her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VPZ1
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe looks on in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)
FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GF10000215538
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VPYS
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe works on handicrafts to sell to tourists in her village in the...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe works on handicrafts to sell to tourists in her village in the...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe works on handicrafts to sell to tourists in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE
RTR3VPXQ
June 25, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe holds a snake while waiting for tourists in his village in the...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe holds a snake while waiting for tourists in his village in the...
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe holds a snake while waiting for tourists in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP TRAVEL SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WCUP-INDIGENOUS TRIBE/
RTR3VPXO
June 25, 2014
A tourist dances with members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro (Black...
Manaus, Brazil
A tourist dances with members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro near of...
A tourist dances with members of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus city, a World Cup host city, June 23, 2014. Because of their proximity to host city Manaus and their warm welcome, the Tatuyo have enjoyed three weeks of brisk business thanks to the World Cup. Usually, they host between 10 and 30 tourists a day. During the World Cup, this number has rocketed to 250 a day, They have become richer and other communities now come to them to sell them juices and fishes. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY SOCCER SPORT TRAVEL WORLD CUP)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VDNI
June 24, 2014
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe plays music, in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe plays music, in his village in the Rio Negro near Manaus City
A member of the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe plays music, in his village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus City, which is one the cities hosting 2014 World Cup matches, June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VDNA
June 24, 2014
Children from the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River)...
Manaus, Brazil
Children from the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro near Manaus City...
Children from the Amazonian Tatuyo tribe play soccer in their village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus City, which is one the cities hosting 2014 World Cup matches, June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VDN4
June 24, 2014
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro near Manaus City
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus City, which is one the cities hosting 2014 World Cup matches, June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3VDN2
June 24, 2014
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus...
Manaus, Brazil
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro near Manaus City
An Amazonian Tatuyo tribe member looks on, in her village in the Rio Negro (Black River) near Manaus City, which is one the cities hosting 2014 World Cup matches, June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Andres Stapff (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13ZVE
September 25, 2013
Amazon Indians face police evicting a group of squatters consisting of Indians and non-Indian settlers...
IRANDUBA, Brazil
Amazon Indians face police evicting a group of squatters consisting of Indians and non-Indian settlers...
Amazon Indians face police evicting a group of squatters consisting of Indians and non-Indian settlers from a plot of privately-owned forest they have been occupying for three months in Iranduba, near Manaus, September 25, 2013. Police acted on a court order to remove the estimated 5,000 squatters. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
Society
Society
Amazonian Tribes Fight for Land Rights - 20 Sep 2013
9 PICTURES
BRAZIL/
RTX13RW5
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RW1
September 20, 2013
An Amazon Indian stops traffic outside the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as members...
Manaus, Brazil
An Amazon Indian stops traffic outside the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI over...
An Amazon Indian stops traffic outside the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as members of different Amazonian tribes occupied the building to protest a court decision evicting them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVW
September 20, 2013
A member of an Amazonian tribe protests a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they...
Manaus, Brazil
A member of an Amazonian tribe protests a court decision during an occupation of the headquarters of...
A member of an Amazonian tribe protests a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks during an occupation of the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVQ
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVL
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVK
September 20, 2013
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs...
Manaus, Brazil
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs...
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVD
September 20, 2013
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs...
Manaus, Brazil
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs...
Police arrive as members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RVA
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes allow a person to enter as they occupy the headquarters of Brazil's...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes allow a person to enter as they occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RUQ
September 20, 2013
An Amazonian Indian keeps watch as he and members of different tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's...
Manaus, Brazil
An Amazonian Indian keeps watch as he and members of different tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's...
An Amazonian Indian keeps watch as he and members of different tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RUM
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus, September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTX13RUI
September 20, 2013
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Manaus, Brazil
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI...
Members of different Amazonian tribes occupy the headquarters of Brazil's Indian affairs bureau FUNAI as they protest a court decision to evict them from a nearby plot of land they have been occupying for several weeks, in Manaus September 19, 2013. According to their leaders, the Indians from the Satere-Mauwe, Mura, Miranha, Munducuru and Apurina tribes invaded the building and took FUNAI employees hostage to pressure them for support in their cause to claim the land as theirs, but the bureau denied assistance saying that those occupying the land were mostly non-Indian settlers. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
VENEZUELA/
RTX11VEY
July 22, 2013
Indians from Amazonian tribes (L), members of the "Platoon of Silent Weapons" of Venezuela's army, stand...
Puerto Ayacucho, Venezuela
Indians from Amazonian tribes, members of the "Platoon of Silent Weapons" of Venezuela's army, stand...
Indians from Amazonian tribes (L), members of the "Platoon of Silent Weapons" of Venezuela's army, stand guard during a welcoming ceremony for Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in Puerto Ayacucho July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY)
BRAZIL/
RTX107KF
May 31, 2013
Amazon Indians march in front of representatives of the Brazilian government as they block the entrance...
VITORIA DO XINGU, Brazil
Amazon Indians march in front of representatives of the Brazilian government at the Belo Monte hydroelectric...
Amazon Indians march in front of representatives of the Brazilian government as they block the entrance to the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State, May 30, 2013. Indians from various tribes continued to force the suspension for the second time in a month of the dam projected to become the world's third largest in energy production, and that they oppose for its impact on the environment and their livelihoods. Picture taken May 30, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BRAZIL/
RTX103I2
May 28, 2013
Amazon Indians occupy the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in Vitoria do Xingu,...
VITORIA DO XINGU, Brazil
Amazon Indians occupy the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in Vitoria do Xingu...
Amazon Indians occupy the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State, May 27, 2013. Indians from various tribes returned to force the suspension for the second time in a month, of the dam projected to become the world's third largest in energy production, opposing it for its impact on the environment and their livelihoods. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BRAZIL/
RTXZ824
May 02, 2013
Amazon Indians from the Xingu, Tapajos and Teles Pires river basins invade the main construction site...
VITORIA DO XINGU, Brazil
Amazon Indians from the Xingu, Tapajos and Teles Pires river basins invade the Belo Monte dam project...
Amazon Indians from the Xingu, Tapajos and Teles Pires river basins invade the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam site in protest against the dam's construction, in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State, May 2, 2013. The Indians from the Munduruku, Juruna, Kayapo, Xipaya, Kuruaya, Asurini, Parakana, and Arara tribes are trying to force the paralyzation of the dam, projected to become the world's third largest in energy production, that they oppose for its impact on the environment and their livelihoods. The protesters said in an open letter that they want a dialogue with the government. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST POLITICS ENERGY)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0FF
December 06, 2012
French President Francois Hollande (C) shakes hands with Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (L),...
Paris, France
French President Hollande shakes hands with Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the...
French President Francois Hollande (C) shakes hands with Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (L), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, after a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0JG
November 29, 2012
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with...
Paris, France
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's...
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's President Francois Hollande during a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christophe Ena/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0IJ
November 29, 2012
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with...
Paris, France
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's...
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's President Francois Hollande during a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christophe Ena/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0IH
November 29, 2012
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with...
Paris, France
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's...
Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (R), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, sits with France's President Francois Hollande during a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christophe Ena/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0GF
November 29, 2012
French President Francois Hollande (R) accompanies Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (L), the...
Paris, France
French President Hollande accompanies Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian...
French President Francois Hollande (R) accompanies Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae (L), the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, as he leaves after a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
FRANCE/
RTR3B0G8
November 29, 2012
French environmental activist Nicolas Hulot (R) and Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief...
Paris, France
French environmental activist Hulot and Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian...
French environmental activist Nicolas Hulot (R) and Brazilian Indian chief Raoni Txukarramae, the chief of the Amazonian Indian tribe Kayapo, pose for photographers after a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
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