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Search results for: Amish

USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX7LAF8
July 22, 2020
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York, U.S. July 21, 2020. Picture...
NEW ALBION, UNITED STATES
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York, U.S. July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-RELIGION/
RTX1D3XK
May 15, 2015
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York May 15, 2015....
New York, UNITED STATES
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York May 15, 2015. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Society
Society
Touring Pennsylvania's Amish Community - 18 Aug 2014
17 PICTURES
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42POC
August 17, 2014
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO2
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO1
August 17, 2014
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvaniaty
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNW
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNU
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNT
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA EDUCATION TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNS
August 17, 2014
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: FOOD RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNM
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNL
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNH
August 17, 2014
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION TRAVEL AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN9
August 17, 2014
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT RELIGION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN8
August 17, 2014
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMY
August 17, 2014
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT EDUCATION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMX
August 17, 2014
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMS
August 17, 2014
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Lancaster County, UNITED STATES
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMR
August 17, 2014
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT AGRICULTURE TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMM
August 17, 2014
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media presentation at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ANIMALS AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMD
August 17, 2014
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407JT
July 26, 2014
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz, Ohio June...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407I3
July 26, 2014
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz,...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz,...
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407HO
July 26, 2014
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz,...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz...
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402JI
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402IO
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402HS
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402H8
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402GO
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402G2
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE HEADSHOT)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402FY
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402FC
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402F6
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE HEADSHOT)
LIBYA-VIOLENCE/
RTR3U2MG
June 16, 2014
A man looks at an election campaign poster for Ibrahim Amish, a candidate vying for a seat in Libya's...
Benghazi, Libya
A man looks at an election poster for Ibrahim Amish, a candidate vying for a seat in Libya's House of...
A man looks at an election campaign poster for Ibrahim Amish, a candidate vying for a seat in Libya's House of Representatives, in Benghazi June 16, 2014. Libyan authorities are struggling to restore order across the vast desert nation ahead of a June 25 parliamentary election, which ordinary citizens hope will bring an end to the chronic political infighting that has paralysed decision-making since the last vote in summer 2012. REUTERS/Esam Omran Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
ENERGY-OHIO/AMISH
RTX16PSH
December 20, 2013
Austin Eudaly (L), an executive with Flatiron Energy Partners, talks with members of the Ohio Amish community...
DEERSVILLE, UNITED STATES
Eudaly, an executve with Flatiron Energy Partners, talks with members of the Ohio Amish community at...
Austin Eudaly (L), an executive with Flatiron Energy Partners, talks with members of the Ohio Amish community at the Deersville, Ohio, Volunteer Fire Department on December 10, 2013. Many farmers in the close-knit Amish community who eschew electricity and most technology, are among landowners capitalizing on a new financial trend in the United States energy booms- selling decades of future oil an natural gas royalties for an immediate pile of cash. Photo taken December 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ernest Scheyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENERGY BUSINESS)
Society
Society
The Power of Forgiveness - 06 Dec 2013
11 PICTURES
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165C0
December 05, 2013
The rebuilt schoolhouse New Hope Amish School is seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013....
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
The rebuilt schoolhouse New Hope Amish School is seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania
The rebuilt schoolhouse New Hope Amish School is seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BV
December 05, 2013
A cross and a graveyard are seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania, December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
A cross and a graveyard are seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania
A cross and a graveyard are seen in Bart Township, Pennsylvania, December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BT
December 05, 2013
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. Terri...
Delta, UNITED STATES
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, would speak next. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BP
December 05, 2013
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. Terri...
Delta, UNITED STATES
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania
The congregation worships at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, would speak next. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BK
December 05, 2013
The technical booth projects visual displays at New Covenant Community Church where Terri Roberts, the...
Delta, UNITED STATES
The technical booth projects visual displays at New Covenant Community Church where Terri Roberts, the...
The technical booth projects visual displays at New Covenant Community Church where Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, spoke in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BD
December 05, 2013
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165BB
December 05, 2013
A member of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church embraces Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
Delta, UNITED STATES
A member of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church embraces Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
A member of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church embraces Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, after she spoke during the service in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165B8
December 05, 2013
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish...
Members of the congregation at New Covenant Community Church greet Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165B1
December 05, 2013
An Amish man and woman sit in a horse and buggy in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct....
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish man and woman sit in a horse and buggy in Bart Township
An Amish man and woman sit in a horse and buggy in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AW
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AV
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AR
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AQ
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AP
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AN
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AM
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AK
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AI
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165AH
December 05, 2013
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2,...
Bart Township, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township
An Amish horse and buggy travels on a road in Bart Township, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. On Oct. 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, 32, took 10 Amish girls hostage in their one-room schoolhouse in rural Pennsylvania, lined them up and shot them in the head. He then killed himself. Along with that, Terri Roberts herself became a victim, forced to confront life knowing that her son had committed such an atrocity. When the Amish forgave her son, it allowed Roberts, who is not Amish, to forgive him as well. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165A9
December 05, 2013
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, is seen at New Covenant Community...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, is seen at New Covenant Community...
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, is seen at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165A6
December 05, 2013
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, holds a photograph of her son at New...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, holds a photograph of her son at New...
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, holds a photograph of her son at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165A4
December 05, 2013
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania on December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165A3
December 05, 2013
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania on December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-SHOOTING/AMISH
RTX165A1
December 05, 2013
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Delta, UNITED STATES
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church...
Terri Roberts, the mother of Amish school shooter Charles Roberts, speaks at New Covenant Community Church in Delta, Pennsylvania on December 1, 2013. After her son shot five Amish schoolgirls to death in 2006, Terri Roberts could have gone into hiding to nurse her pain, like many parents of mass murderers have in the past. Instead, she broke with convention. Drawing inspiration from the Amish who were so quick to forgive her son, Roberts, 62, has embraced the victims' families in return and now publicly tells her story about the power of forgiveness. Picture taken December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
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