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Search results for: Amish

RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMD5U
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20,...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMD5R
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, picks a sheep that Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, picked to slaughter...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, picks a sheep that Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, picked to slaughter on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMD5E
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, holds the sheep for Tarek Hamada, a Tunisian immigrant, to slaughter it on the...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, holds the sheep for Tarek Hamada, a Tunisian immigrant, to slaughter it on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMD5C
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, takes Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, to the barn to pick a sheep to slaughter...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, takes Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, to the barn to pick a sheep to slaughter on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMD1V
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, hangs a sheep after skiing it on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana,...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, hangs a sheep after skiing it on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMCTH
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Maher Chebbi and Tarek Hamada bag their sheep on the morning...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Maher Chebbi and Tarek Hamada bag their sheep on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMCJ2
July 20, 2021
Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, helps Eli, an Amish farmer, to cut the meat on the morning of...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Aziz Ben Hassine, a Tunisian immigrant, helps Eli, an Amish farmer, to cut the meat on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMCBA
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Tunisian immigrants Maher Chebbi, Tarek Hama and his son Salim...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Tunisian immigrants Maher Chebbi, Tarek Hama and his son Salim watch on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMCAY
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Maher Chebbi, Tunisian immigrant, pulls it up on the morning...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, skins a sheep while Maher Chebbi, Tunisian immigrant, pulls it up on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMC4W
July 20, 2021
Moroccan immigrants wash their sheep after slaughter at an Amish farm on the morning of Eid al-Adha in...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Moroccan immigrants wash their sheep after slaughter at an Amish farm on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMBYE
July 20, 2021
Eli, an Amish farmer, walks a sheep to the slaughter house on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans,...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
Eli, an Amish farmer, walks a sheep to the slaughter house on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
RELIGION-EID/INDIANA
RTXEMBYC
July 20, 2021
A sheep runs in the barn at an Amish farm on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July...
Orleans, UNITED STATES
Eid is marked in Indiana
A sheep runs in the barn at an Amish farm on the morning of Eid al-Adha in Orleans, Indiana, U.S., July 20, 2021. REUTERS/Amira Karaoud
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5W
June 04, 2021
Amish buggies are displayed for sale in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse...
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
Amish buggies are displayed for sale in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5V
June 04, 2021
Amish girls travel by bicycle through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
Amish girls travel by bicycle through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5U
June 04, 2021
An Amish man travels by horse and buggy through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen...
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
An Amish man travels by horse and buggy through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5T
June 04, 2021
An Amish man travels by horse and buggy through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen...
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
An Amish man travels by horse and buggy through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5S
June 04, 2021
Two Amish travel by bicycle through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
Two Amish travel by bicycle through Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5M
June 04, 2021
Amish and other locals attend a fundraising auction in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen...
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
Amish and other locals attend a fundraising auction in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN5K
June 04, 2021
An Amish man plows a field in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
An Amish man plows a field in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MASKS
RTXCYN49
June 04, 2021
An Amish man plows a field in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
Columbus, OH, UNITED STATES
Mask mandate ends in Ohio
An Amish man plows a field in Holmes County, Ohio, U.S., June 4, 2021. REUTERS/Gaelen Morse
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX87FAR
November 05, 2020
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX87FA1
November 05, 2020
Amish people look on during a walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020....
Washington, UNITED STATES
Amish people look on during a walk near the White House, in Washington
Amish people look on during a walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX87F8G
November 05, 2020
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington
Amish people walk near the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX850VL
October 26, 2020
Amish children look out of a horse-drawn buggy as they travel through Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S. October...
Lancaster, UNITED STATES
Amish children look out of a horse-drawn buggy as they travel through Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Amish children look out of a horse-drawn buggy as they travel through Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 25, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX850VK
October 26, 2020
An Amish boy looks out of the window of a horse-drawn buggy as he travels through Lancaster, Pennsylvania,...
Lancaster, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy looks out of the window of a horse-drawn buggy as he travels through Lancaster, Pennsylvania...
An Amish boy looks out of the window of a horse-drawn buggy as he travels through Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 25, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-ELECTION/TRUMP
RTX850TZ
October 26, 2020
An Amish horse and buggy pass a sign supporting U.S President Donald Trump in Lancaster, Pennsylvania,...
Lancaster, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse and buggy pass a sign supporting U.S President Donald Trump in Lancaster, Pennsylvania...
An Amish horse and buggy pass a sign supporting U.S President Donald Trump in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S. October 25, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-ELECTION/CORONAVIRUS
RTX83FUH
October 19, 2020
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio, U.S., October...
Mesopotamia, UNITED STATES
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio, U.S., October 1, 2020. Picture taken October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
USA-ELECTION/OHIO
RTX7ZE3A
October 02, 2020
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio, U.S., October...
Mesopotamia, UNITED STATES
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio
Amish children are seen outside a school building in the countryside of Mesopotamia, Ohio, U.S., October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
USA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX7LAF8
July 22, 2020
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York, U.S. July 21, 2020. Picture...
NEW ALBION, UNITED STATES
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York
An Amish family travels by horse and buggy down a road in New Albion, New York, U.S. July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-RELIGION/
RTX1D3XK
May 15, 2015
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York May 15, 2015....
New York, UNITED STATES
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York
Amish youth from Ohio recite gospel songs in the Times Square subway in Midtown, New York May 15, 2015. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Society
Society
Touring Pennsylvania's Amish Community - 18 Aug 2014
17 PICTURES
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42POC
August 17, 2014
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County,...
An Amish family walks to their friends' house for a visit as seen on a buggy tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO2
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy jumps on a trampoline at his home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PO1
August 17, 2014
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvaniaty
A silhouetted Amish man waits during his buggy tour in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNW
August 17, 2014
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
An Amish boy sells painted horseshoes to tourists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNU
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, leads tourists through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNT
August 17, 2014
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County,...
John Fisher, an Amish buggy driver, closes the door of his buggy during a tour through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA EDUCATION TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNS
August 17, 2014
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania...
Amish youths wait on customers at a farmer's market produce booth in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: FOOD RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNM
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNL
August 17, 2014
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Film maker Mary Haverstick poses in a corn field in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PNH
August 17, 2014
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination...
Dan Roller photographs his wife, Sharon, seated on a buggy, at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION TRAVEL AGRICULTURE MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN9
August 17, 2014
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village...
Souvenirs are seen on sale at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT RELIGION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PN8
August 17, 2014
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a...
Haya Almekemi and Moaath, 5, visiting from Kuwait, shop for an example of Amish girls' clothing at a gift shop within the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMY
August 17, 2014
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience,...
A tour group listens to tour guide Joe Ditzler discuss Amish women's clothing at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT EDUCATION TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMX
August 17, 2014
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Amish dig a grave in a cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMS
August 17, 2014
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Lancaster County, UNITED STATES
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
A multi-leveled clothesline hangs at an Amish residence in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMR
August 17, 2014
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism...
Tour guide Art Pavlatos wears a branded short-sleeved dress shirt at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT AGRICULTURE TRAVEL)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMM
August 17, 2014
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media...
An Amish horse-drawn buggy is shown on video involved in a fatal accident, part of a narrative in a multi-media presentation at the Amish Experience, a tourism destination in the village of Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION ANIMALS AGRICULTURE EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA)
USA-AMISH/TV
RTR42PMD
August 17, 2014
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014....
Bird in Hand, UNITED STATES
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania
An Amish man travels on a dirt road by a horse-drawn buggy in Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania August 9, 2014. It's that Old World charm of the Amish that draws 8 million tourists - and $1.9 billion - each year to Pennsylvania's Lancaster County, home of the nation's largest Amish community of 31,000. What the Amish don't do, supporters say, is tote rifles as part of a violent protection racket - as depicted in the television show "Amish Mafia" - or regularly defy their religion, like in "Breaking Amish" and "Breaking Amish: Brave New World." And, Amish horror stories are not the norm, despite the plot lines of the upcoming "Amish Haunting." Filmmaker Mary Haverstick is leading a push to eject the shows, airing on the Discovery Channel and related networks, from Lancaster County. The movement is gathering support because of what some see as a demeaning, inaccurate portrayal of the gentle, devout group. But some wonder if the hard-edged reality TV approach is that different from the soft exploitation of the Amish by the local tourism industry. In both, the Amish are unpaid, costumed "extras." Picture taken August 9, 2014. REUTERS/Mark Makela (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS RELIGION MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407JT
July 26, 2014
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz, Ohio June...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz
The horse-drawn carriage used by Kathryn and Raymond Miller to travel is pictured in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407I3
July 26, 2014
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz,...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz,...
The road in front of the home of Kathryn and Raymond Miller is seen in an Amish community in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
USA-AMISH/
RTR407HO
July 26, 2014
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz,...
BERGHOLZ, UNITED STATES
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz...
Laundry hangs between the homes of Kathryn and Raymond Miller and Nancy and Freeman Burkholder in Bergholz, Ohio June 6, 2014. The Millers, members of an Amish breakaway sect from eastern Ohio at the center of shocking 2011 hair-cutting attacks on other Amish followers, are trying to settle back into life at home after being exposed in prison to a world their religion is focused on locking out. Picture taken June 6, 2014. To match feature USA-AMISH/ REUTERS/Kim Palmer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW RELIGION)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402JI
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402IO
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402HS
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402H8
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402GO
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402G2
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE HEADSHOT)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402FY
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
MUSIC-WEIRDAL/
RTR402FC
July 25, 2014
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles
Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic poses for a portrait in the Reuters bureau in Los Angeles, California July 24, 2014. The 54-year-old singer of such songs as "Eat It," a culinary spoof on Michael Jackson's 1983 hit "Beat It" and "Amish Paradise," the send-up of rapper Coolio's 1995 sensation "Gangsta's Paradise," scored his first No. 1 album on the U.S. Billboard chart with "Mandatory Fun", following a week-long rollout of music videos. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE)
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