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Search results for: Animal-testing

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-VENTILATORS
RTS386FZ
April 06, 2020
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for...
Kawaguchi, Japan
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for...
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for animals but may be used for human coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at their factory in Kawaguchi, north of Tokyo, Japan April 2, 2020. Picture taken April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-VENTILATORS
RTS386FU
April 06, 2020
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for...
Kawaguchi, Japan
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for...
An employee of Metran Co. tests the company's 'Compos X' ventilator, which was originally developed for animals but may be used for human coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at their factory in Kawaguchi, north of Tokyo, Japan April 2, 2020. Picture taken April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
MALAYSIA-PROTEST/
RTX7ATX5
November 28, 2019
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a metal cage against what they say is Ajinomoto's use of animal testing outside the company's headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 28, 2019. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng
MALAYSIA-PROTEST/
RTX7ATWK
November 28, 2019
A police officer takes a picture of activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals),...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A police officer takes a picture of activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals),...
A police officer takes a picture of activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protesting against what they say is Ajinomoto's use of animal testing outside the company's headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 28, 2019. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng
MALAYSIA-PROTEST/
RTX7ATWG
November 28, 2019
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a metal cage against what they say is Ajinomoto's use of animal testing outside the company's headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 28, 2019. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng
MALAYSIA-PROTEST/
RTX7ATWE
November 28, 2019
An activist from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as a rat, protests inside...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
An activist from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as a rat, protests inside...
An activist from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as a rat, protests inside a metal cage against what PETA says is Ajinomoto's use of animal testing outside the company's headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 28, 2019. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng
MALAYSIA-PROTEST/
RTX7ATUQ
November 28, 2019
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a...
Activists from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), dressed as rats, protest inside a metal cage against what they say is Ajinomoto's use of animal testing outside the company's headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 28, 2019. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng
THAILAND-PIGEONS/
RTS22VE6
September 26, 2018
Government officers test a pigeon after they catch it on a street side in Bangkok, Thailand September...
Bangkok, Thailand
Government officers test a pigeon after they catch it on a street side in Bangkok
Government officers test a pigeon after they catch it on a street side in Bangkok, Thailand September 26, 2018. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
CHRISTMAS-SEASON/PARIS
RTX2VD6T
December 16, 2016
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas...
Paris, France
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas...
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas holiday season animations in Paris, France, December 16, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
CHRISTMAS-SEASON/PARIS
RTX2VD6G
December 16, 2016
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas...
Paris, France
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas...
People test virtual reality Samsung Gear VR glasses at the Grand Palais exhibition hall as part of Christmas holiday season animations in Paris, France, December 16, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
MEXICO-PROTEST/
RTX2BH25
April 25, 2016
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Mexico City, Mexico
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for Laboratory Animals at the Revolucion monument in Mexico City, Mexico, April 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ginnette Riquelme
MEXICO-PROTEST/
RTX2BH0W
April 25, 2016
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Mexico City, Mexico
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for Laboratory Animals at the Revolucion monument in Mexico City, Mexico, April 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ginnette Riquelme
MEXICO-PROTEST/
RTX2BH0V
April 25, 2016
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Mexico City, Mexico
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for...
Activists from AnimaNaturalis take part in a demonstration against animal testing during World Day for Laboratory Animals at the Revolucion monument in Mexico City, Mexico, April 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ginnette Riquelme TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM4
April 06, 2016
A white-tailed eagle sits on the roof of an abandoned school near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone...
TULGOVICHI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A white-tailed eagle sits on the roof of an abandoned school near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, Belarus, January 29, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone", roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM1
April 06, 2016
A yellowhammer is seen on the remains of a house at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...
OREVICHI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A yellowhammer is seen on the remains of a house at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, March 12, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM0
April 06, 2016
A fox walks through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the...
BABCHIN, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A fox walks through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, March 5, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLZ
April 06, 2016
An abandoned house is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
POGONNOE, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An abandoned house is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLV
April 06, 2016
A woodpecker looks out of a hollow in a tree in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...
BABCHIN, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A woodpecker looks out of a hollow in a tree in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, April 3, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLU
April 06, 2016
An otter swims in a river in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
POGONNOE, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An otter swims in a river in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Pogonnoe, Belarus, March 13, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLR
April 06, 2016
A golden eagle approaches the remains of an elk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...
BABCHIN, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A golden eagle approaches the remains of an elk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, March 16, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLQ
April 06, 2016
A black stork flies through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A black stork flies through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, April 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLP
April 06, 2016
A wolf crosses a road in a forest in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A wolf crosses a road in a forest in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, April 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLO
April 06, 2016
A tawny owl leaves a chimney in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
KAZHUSHKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A tawny owl leaves a chimney in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Kazhushki, Belarus, March 16, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLH
April 06, 2016
Elks are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Elks are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLA
April 06, 2016
Ruined farm's buildings are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
POGONNOE, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Ruined farm's buildings are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Pogonnoe, Belarus, March 13, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL9
April 06, 2016
A wolf looks into the camera at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
OREVICHI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A wolf looks into the camera at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, March 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. Photo taken with trail camera. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL8
April 06, 2016
A magpie flies over a barbed wire fence at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
BABCHIN, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A magpie flies over a barbed wire fence at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, February 18, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL6
April 06, 2016
Hunters drag wolves killed in a field outside of the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...
KHRAPKOV, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Hunters drag wolves killed in a field outside of the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Khrapkov, Belarus, January 27, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL4
April 06, 2016
Wolves walk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned...
OREVICHI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Wolves walk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, February 25, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. Photo taken with trail camera. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL3
April 06, 2016
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL2
April 06, 2016
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL1
April 06, 2016
A white-tailed eagle lands on a wolf's carcass in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A white-tailed eagle lands on a wolf's carcass in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, February 15, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKZ
April 06, 2016
An elk runs in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village...
BABCHIN, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An elk runs in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Babchin, Belarus, January 27, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKY
April 06, 2016
A radiation sign is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor...
DRONKI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A radiation sign is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, February 11, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKW
April 06, 2016
A World War Two monument is seen near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear...
TULGOVICHI, Belarus
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A World War Two monument is seen near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Babchin, Belarus, January 26, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4I
February 11, 2016
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K48
February 11, 2016
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA-IAEA/
RTX26C1S
February 10, 2016
A scientist displays Aedes aegypti mosquitoes inside the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA)...
SEIBERSDORF, Austria
A scientist displays Aedes aegypti mosquitoes inside the IAEA laboratory in Seibersdorf
A scientist displays Aedes aegypti mosquitoes inside the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) insect pest control laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria, February 10, 2016. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT
RTX25I5L
February 04, 2016
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo,...
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 2,2016. Leading researchers in Brazil are borrowing techniques used to accelerate the fight against Ebola in the hope of developing a Zika virus treatment that could be tested in humans in a year. Kalil told Reuters this week scientists there planned to use animals to produce antibodies to tackle the virus, which is suspected of causing brain damage in more than 4,000 infants in the South American country. To match Interview HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT Picture taken February 2, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT
RTX25I5E
February 04, 2016
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo,...
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 2,2016. Leading researchers in Brazil are borrowing techniques used to accelerate the fight against Ebola in the hope of developing a Zika virus treatment that could be tested in humans in a year. Kalil told Reuters this week scientists there planned to use animals to produce antibodies to tackle the virus, which is suspected of causing brain damage in more than 4,000 infants in the South American country. To match Interview HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT Picture taken February 2, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT
RTX25I4M
February 04, 2016
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Professor Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in...
Jorge Kalil, head of the state-run Butantan institute, attends an interview with Reuters in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 2,2016. Leading researchers in Brazil are borrowing techniques used to accelerate the fight against Ebola in the hope of developing a Zika virus treatment that could be tested in humans in a year. Kalil told Reuters this week scientists there planned to use animals to produce antibodies to tackle the virus, which is suspected of causing brain damage in more than 4,000 infants in the South American country. To match Interview HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL-TREATMENT Picture taken February 2, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/GUATEMALA
RTX256J2
February 02, 2016
A municipal health worker shows off a test tube with larvae of Zika virus vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito,...
Guatemala City, Guatemala
Municipal health worker shows off a test tube with larvae of Zika virus vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito,...
A municipal health worker shows off a test tube with larvae of Zika virus vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, as part of the city's efforts to prevent the spread of the Zika, in Guatemala City, Guatemala, February 2, 2016. REUTERS/Josue Decavele
BELGIUM-AGRICULTURE/TUBERCULOSIS
RTX1NHH7
August 07, 2015
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to...
VLEZENBEEK, Belgium
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to cull cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis at a dairy farm in eastern Belgium and are now testing animals at some 150 other farms, the Belgian food safety regulator said on Friday. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-AGRICULTURE/TUBERCULOSIS
RTX1NHH5
August 07, 2015
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to...
VLEZENBEEK, Belgium
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to cull cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis at a dairy farm in eastern Belgium and are now testing animals at some 150 other farms, the Belgian food safety regulator said on Friday. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-AGRICULTURE/TUBERCULOSIS
RTX1NHGZ
August 07, 2015
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to...
VLEZENBEEK, Belgium
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to cull cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis at a dairy farm in eastern Belgium and are now testing animals at some 150 other farms, the Belgian food safety regulator said on Friday. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-AGRICULTURE/TUBERCULOSIS
RTX1NHGX
August 07, 2015
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to...
VLEZENBEEK, Belgium
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to cull cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis at a dairy farm in eastern Belgium and are now testing animals at some 150 other farms, the Belgian food safety regulator said on Friday. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-AGRICULTURE/TUBERCULOSIS
RTX1NHGQ
August 07, 2015
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to...
VLEZENBEEK, Belgium
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels
Cows graze in a field in Vlezenbeek near Brussels, August 7, 2015. Veterinary authorities have had to cull cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis at a dairy farm in eastern Belgium and are now testing animals at some 150 other farms, the Belgian food safety regulator said on Friday. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
RUSSIA-ANIMALS/
RTR4W0V7
April 03, 2015
German shepherd dogs go through a test during a special and a general search training course at a local...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
German shepherd dogs go through a test during a special and general search training course at a local...
German shepherd dogs go through a test during a special and a general search training course at a local cynologist police centre in a suburb of Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk April 3, 2015. Dogs at the cynologist centre are trained to help the police patrol streets, search for drugs, explosives and weapons, as well as with criminal investigations. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7YK
January 21, 2015
A worker checks on birds being dried after a cleaning at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A worker checks on birds being dried after a cleaning at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A worker checks on birds being dried after a cleaning at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7YG
January 21, 2015
A volunteer feeds a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A volunteer feeds a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A volunteer feeds a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7YF
January 21, 2015
A volunteer checks on a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A volunteer checks on a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A volunteer checks on a bird after it was cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7YB
January 20, 2015
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7YA
January 20, 2015
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7Y7
January 20, 2015
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7Y1
January 20, 2015
A worker carries a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A worker carries a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A worker carries a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7XY
January 20, 2015
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7XX
January 20, 2015
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
Workers clean a bird at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7XW
January 20, 2015
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-SEABIRDS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4M7XV
January 20, 2015
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey,...
Fairfield, UNITED STATES
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield
A bird is cleaned at the International Bird Rescue in Fairfield, California January 20, 2015. A gooey, unknown material discovered on the eastern shores of San Francisco Bay is clinging to the feathers of birds, and more than 100 birds, mostly species of oceangoing, diving ducks, have died after their feathers were fouled by the viscous substance now undergoing testing at state labs in Sacramento. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
USA-TEXAS/SKULL
RTR4EHUW
November 17, 2014
Carly, a nearly 14-year-old Labrador retriever, appears at a news conference at a federal court in Austin,...
Austin, UNITED STATES
Carly, a nearly 14-year-old Labrador retriever appears at a news conference at a federal court in Austin,...
Carly, a nearly 14-year-old Labrador retriever, appears at a news conference at a federal court in Austin, Texas November 17, 2014. The dog found a human skull in September and brought it to the Austin home of her owners. DNA testing indicated it belonged to Kevin Patrick Stoeser, who had been convicted of sexually abusing children and was one of the U.S. Marshal Service?s most wanted fugitives, the marshals said on Monday. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW ANIMALS)
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