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Search results for: Arhuacos

COLOMBIA-REBELS/SIGNING-PREPS
RTSPEBD
September 26, 2016
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena, Colombia, September 25, 2016. REUTERS/John...
CARATGENA, Colombia
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena, Colombia, September 25, 2016. REUTERS/John Vizcaino
COLOMBIA-REBELS/SIGNING-PREPS
RTSPEBC
September 26, 2016
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena, Colombia, September 25,2016. REUTERS/John...
CARATGENA, Colombia
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena
Arhuacos Indians are seen at San Pedro Square in Cartagena, Colombia, September 25,2016. REUTERS/John Vizcaino
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O5
January 30, 2014
An indigenous Arhuaco girl stands at the entrance of her house in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
An indigenous Arhuaco girl stands at the entrance of her house in Pueblo Bello
An indigenous Arhuaco girl stands at the entrance of her house in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS AGRICULTURE FOOD)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O4
January 30, 2014
Coffee grower Ramon Eliodoro Mejia poses after selling 613 kg (1351 pounds) of organic coffee during...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
Coffee grower Ramon Eliodoro Mejia poses after selling 613 kg of organic coffee during the weighing and...
Coffee grower Ramon Eliodoro Mejia poses after selling 613 kg (1351 pounds) of organic coffee during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the National Coffee Growers Federation in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS AGRICULTURE FOOD)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O3
January 30, 2014
A traditional Arhuaco house is seen in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
A traditional Arhuaco house is seen in Pueblo Bello
A traditional Arhuaco house is seen in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD AGRICULTURE)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O2
January 30, 2014
A worker collects coffee beans after being dried at a farm of the National Coffee Growers Federation...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
A worker collects coffee beans after being dried at a farm of the National Coffee Growers Federation...
A worker collects coffee beans after being dried at a farm of the National Coffee Growers Federation in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD AGRICULTURE)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O1
January 30, 2014
A worker selects 200 grams of organic coffee during a quality test for weighing and sale process at a...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
A worker selects 200 grams of organic coffee during a quality test for weighing and sale process at a...
A worker selects 200 grams of organic coffee during a quality test for weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the National Coffee Growers Federation in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS AGRICULTURE FOOD)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181O0
January 30, 2014
A worker carries a coffee sack during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the National Coffee...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
A worker extracts samples of organic coffee during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the...
A worker carries a coffee sack during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the National Coffee Growers Federation in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: BUSINESS AGRICULTURE FOOD)
COLOMBIA/
RTX181NZ
January 30, 2014
A worker extracts samples of organic coffee during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
A worker extracts samples of organic coffee during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the...
A worker extracts samples of organic coffee during the weighing and sale process at a warehouse of the National Coffee Growers Federation in Pueblo Bello, northern Cesar province January 29, 2014. Cafe Nacer Association groups together 147 members - including Arhuacos indigenous farmers and farmers of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - to cultivate organic coffee which last year exported 160,000 kilograms to the United States and Canada. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS FOOD)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPR0
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku walks alongside Los Tunjos lagoon after a ceremony in Sumapaz's National...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku walks alongside Los Tunjos lagoon after a ceremony in Sumapaz's National...
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku walks alongside Los Tunjos lagoon after a ceremony in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA TRAVEL ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQV
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco Indian Ati Quigua, a local lawmaker of Bogota DC, attends a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian Ati Quigua, a local lawmaker of Bogota DC, attends a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in...
Arhuaco Indian Ati Quigua, a local lawmaker of Bogota DC, attends a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL SOCIETY)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQT
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park...
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA TRAVEL SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQR
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco Indians attend a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco Indians attend a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park
Arhuaco Indians attend a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA TRAVEL SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQP
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL SOCIETY)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQN
April 06, 2009
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's...
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL SOCIETY)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQI
April 06, 2009
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's...
An Arhuaco Indian prepares his traditional "poporo" during a ceremony in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA TRAVEL SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQH
April 06, 2009
A view of Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
A view of Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park
A view of Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRAVEL)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQE
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays to the sky in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays to the sky in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park
Arhuaco indian leader Arwa Viku prays to the sky in Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz's National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRAVEL)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQB
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through a shell alongside Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through a shell alongside Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz...
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through a shell alongside Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTXDPQ8
April 06, 2009
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through the shell of a snail alongside Los Tunjos lagoon...
Sumapaz National Park, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through the shell of a snail alongside Los Tunjos lagoon...
Arhuaco Indian leader Arwa Viku plays a melody through the shell of a snail alongside Los Tunjos lagoon in Sumapaz National Park April 3, 2009. Arhuacos Indians of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta practiced ceremony in the lagoon that is considered the most important source of water in the country. The Mamo, a spiritual leader, accompanied by six Indians, staged an ancient ritual to convince the government to preserve water in this area of the country, which was controlled by leftist FARC rebels two years ago before the army retook the area. Picture taken on April 3, 2009. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA SOCIETY IMAGE OF THE DAY TOP PICTURE ENVIRONMENT)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XR
June 22, 2007
Colombian singer Carlos Vives poses with children from the Arhuacos tribe during the annual summer solstice...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Colombian singer Vives poses with children from the Arhuacos tribe during the annual summer solstice...
Colombian singer Carlos Vives poses with children from the Arhuacos tribe during the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XQ
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XP
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe arrive at the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe arrive at the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
Members of an Arhuacos tribe arrive at the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XM
June 22, 2007
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XL
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick up seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick up seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth...
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick up seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XH
June 22, 2007
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XG
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XE
June 22, 2007
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
A member of an Arhuacos tribe attends the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. The banner reads "No more landmines". REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0XC
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake
Members of an Arhuacos tribe attend the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA/
RTR1R0X9
June 22, 2007
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in...
Nabusimake, Colombia
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in...
Members of an Arhuacos tribe pick seeds as part of the annual summer solstice tribute to the earth in Nabusimake June 21, 2007. This year the Arhuacos tribe are paying tribute and praying to the gods of the earth and sun to keep them safe from landmines. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJL3
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian poses during a interview in Nabusikame, Colombia, November 17, 2006. After suffering...
Nabusimake, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
An Arhuaco Indian poses during a interview in Nabusikame, Colombia, November 17, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJL2
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian looks out of his window in Nabusikame, Colombia, November 17, 2006. After suffering...
Nabusimake, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
An Arhuaco Indian looks out of his window in Nabusikame, Colombia, November 17, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJL1
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian waves his traditional "Poporo" near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
An Arhuaco Indian waves his traditional "Poporo" near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJL0
December 18, 2006
Dew drops form on coffee beans at a plantation near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
Dew drops form on coffee beans at a plantation near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJKZ
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian leads his mules loaded with sacks of coffee in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18,...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
An Arhuaco Indian leads his mules loaded with sacks of coffee in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJKY
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian dries coffee beans on a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
An Arhuaco Indian dries coffee beans on a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. To match feature COLOMBIA-INDIANS/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJIR
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian picks coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian picks coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJIN
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian waits for his coffee crop to be weighed before selling it, in Pueblo Bello, Colombia,...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian waits for his coffee crop to be weighed before selling it, in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJIL
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian stands next to coffee beans which are being dried along a street in Pueblo Bello, Colombia,...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian stands next to coffee beans which are being dried along a street in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJIE
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian dries coffee beans in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian dries coffee beans in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJIB
December 18, 2006
A dog rests next to coffee beans which are being dried in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006....
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
A dog rests next to coffee beans which are being dried in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJI9
December 18, 2006
Arhuaco Indians walk in front of coffee beans being dried in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006....
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
Arhuaco Indians walk in front of coffee beans being dried in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJI6
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian pulls a mule loaded with sacks of coffee in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006....
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian pulls a mule loaded with sacks of coffee in Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJI2
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian prepares coffee beans to be peeled in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian prepares coffee beans to be peeled in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJHX
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian prepares coffee beans to be peeled in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian prepares coffee beans to be peeled in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJHQ
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/ REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJHN
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
COLOMBIA-INDIANS/
RTR1KJFN
December 18, 2006
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After...
Pueblo Bello, Colombia
To match feature Colombia-Indians/
An Arhuaco Indian picks up coffee beans in a farm near Pueblo Bello, Colombia, November 18, 2006. After suffering years of violence, Colombia's Arhuaco Indians hope the peace that has begun to take root in their secluded mountain homeland will help them protect their culture and grow more of the organic coffee prized by Japanese and European clients. Picture taken November 18, 2006. To match feature Colombia-Indians/. REUTERS/Jose Miguel Gomez (COLOMBIA)
SABANA CRESPO
RTRDGJX
October 24, 2004
Arhuacos Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
Arhuacos Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo.
Arhuacos Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte/FEATURE COLOMBIA-INDIAN EA
SABANA CRESPO
RTRDGJH
October 24, 2004
An Arhuacos Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuacos Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuacos Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte/FEATURE COLOMBIA-INDIAN EA
SABANA CRESPO
RTRDGIQ
October 24, 2004
An Arhuacos Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuacos Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuacos Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte/FEATURE COLOMBIA-INDIAN EA
COLOMBIA
RTXMZK0
October 15, 2004
Men of the Arhuacos Indian tribe in Colombia knit their own caps in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004....
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
Men of the Arhuacos Indian tribe in Colombia knit their own caps in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004......
Men of the Arhuacos Indian tribe in Colombia knit their own caps in Sabana Crespo, October 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year.
SABANA CRESPO
RTRDGIZ
October 15, 2004
An Arhuacos Indian man chews coca leaves and works his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo, Octobre 24, 2004....
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuacos Indian man chews coca leaves and works his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuacos Indian man chews coca leaves and works his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo, Octobre 24, 2004. Arhuacos Indians, who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte/FEATURE COLOMBIA-INDIAN EA
COLOMBIA STRIKE
RTRD8ZM
October 12, 2004
Colombia's Arhuacos indigenous dance during a protest in Bogota, October 12, 2004. More than 10,000 protesters...
Bogota, Colombia
Colombia's Arhuacos indigenous dance during a protest in Bogota.
Colombia's Arhuacos indigenous dance during a protest in Bogota, October 12, 2004. More than 10,000 protesters shut down central Bogota on Tuesday during a 24-hour general strike against the government's tight fiscal policies and President Alvaro Uribe's bid for reelection. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE2H
September 24, 2004
Arhuaco Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004....
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo.
Arhuaco Indian men walk in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE29
September 24, 2004
An Arhuaco Indian girl spends a quiet moment in her home in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuaco Indian girl spends a quiet moment in her home in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuaco Indian girl spends a quiet moment in her home in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Apont EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE22
September 24, 2004
An Arhuaco Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this photo taken...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuaco Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo,.
An Arhuaco Indian man shows his ritual gourd in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE1M
September 24, 2004
An Arhuaco Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24,...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuaco Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuaco Indian man relaxes in Sabana Crespo province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Aponte/ EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE1F
September 24, 2004
Arhuaco Indian women in Colombia knit in the kitchen in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this photo...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
Arhuaco Indian women in Colombia knit in the kitchen in Sabana Crespo.
Arhuaco Indian women in Colombia knit in the kitchen in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. But the Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA
COLOMBIA INDIANS
RTRDE19
September 24, 2004
An Arhuacos Indian girl helps prepare a meal in her home in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this...
Sabana Crespo, Colombia
An Arhuacos Indian girl helps prepare a meal in her home in Sabana Crespo.
An Arhuacos Indian girl helps prepare a meal in her home in Sabana Crespo, province of Cesar, in this photo taken on September 24, 2004. Arhuaco Indians who live in Colombia's Sierra Nevada mountains, say they have decided to limit any further exposure to outsiders in their traditional lands. The Arhuacos, who say they oppose the construction of roads and dams in their territory, also face the threat of far-right paramilitary outlaws, who killed two Indians last year. FOR FEATURE STORY COLOMBIA-INDIANS REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA
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