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Search results for: BARRE-SINOUSSI-Francoise

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-MACRON
RTX7DIR6
April 16, 2020
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi...
Paris, France
President Macron video conference
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (unseen) on ongoing efforts to accelerate the development and access to vaccine and treatment against the coronavirus, following an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, April 16 2020. Yoan Valat/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-MACRON
RTX7DIR7
April 16, 2020
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi...
Paris, France
President Macron video conference
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi on ongoing efforts to accelerate the development and access to vaccine and treatment against the coronavirus, following an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, April 16 2020. Yoan Valat/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-MACRON
RTX7DIR5
April 16, 2020
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi...
Paris, France
President Macron video conference
French President Emmanuel Macron attends a videoconference with French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (unseen) on ongoing efforts to accelerate the development and access to vaccine and treatment against the coronavirus, following an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, April 16 2020. Yoan Valat/Pool via REUTERS
FRANCE-POLITICS/
RTX2ESQD
May 30, 2016
Nobel Prize laureate Francoise Barre- Sinoussi arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 30,...
Paris, France
Nobel Prize laureate Francoise Barre- Sinoussi arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris
Nobel Prize laureate Francoise Barre- Sinoussi arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8S
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, reacts during an interview with Reuters in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8R
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8N
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8M
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8L
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8K
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8C
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8A
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O89
October 09, 2015
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with team leader Asier Saez-Cirion following an interview with Reuters...
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur in Paris Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with team leader Asier Saez-Cirion following an interview with Reuters in Paris October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O88
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, gestures during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O87
October 09, 2015
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with Michaela Muller-Trutwin following an interview with Reuters, in...
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur in Paris Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with associate professor HIV, Head Virology Department Michaela Muller-Trutwin following an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
FRANCE/
RTX11NLV
July 15, 2013
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L), and businessman and...
Paris, France
French virologist Barre-Sinoussi and Sidaction President Berge leave after a meeting at the Elysee Palace...
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L), and businessman and Sidaction President Pierre Berge answer journalists questions as they leave after a meeting with French President at the Elysee Palace in Paris July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
FRANCE/
RTX11NLU
July 15, 2013
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R), businessman and Sidaction...
Paris, France
French virologist Barre-Sinoussi Sidaction President Berge and French National Agency against AIDS Delfraissy...
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R), businessman and Sidaction President Pierre Berge (C) and Jean-Francois Delfraissy, President of the French National Agency against AIDS (ANRS) leave after a meeting with the French president at the Elysee Palace in Paris July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
FRANCE/
RTX11NLQ
July 15, 2013
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R), businessman and Sidaction...
Paris, France
French virologist Barre-Sinoussi, Sidaction President Berge and President of the French National Agency...
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R), businessman and Sidaction President Pierre Berge (C) and Jean-Francois Delfraissy, President of the French National Agency against AIDS (ANRS) leave after a meeting with the French president at the Elysee Palace in Paris July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
FRANCE/
RTX11NLO
July 15, 2013
REFILE - ADDING DROPPED WORD LAUREATE
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi...
Paris, France
French virologist Barre-Sinoussi and Sidaction President Berge leave after a meeting at the Elysee Palace...
REFILE - ADDING DROPPED WORD LAUREATE
French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L), and businessman and Sidaction President Pierre Berge answer journalists questions as they leave after a meeting with the French president at the Elysee Palace in Paris July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
FRANCE/
RTR3B2DC
November 30, 2012
France's President Francois Hollande (L) applauds 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize winner Francoise Barre Sinoussi...
Kremlin Bicetre, France
France's President Hollande applauds 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize winner Francoise Barre Sinoussi after...
France's President Francois Hollande (L) applauds 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize winner Francoise Barre Sinoussi (R) after unveiling a plaque in her honour during a visit at the Kremlin Bicetre hospital, south of Paris, as part of World AIDS Day, November 30, 2012. REUTERS/Remy de la Mauviniere/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE/
RTXQ1WX
October 27, 2009
Pierre Berge (R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses with...
Paris, France
Pierre Berge, French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses before...
Pierre Berge (R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses with French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize Francoise Barre-Sinoussi before a news conference to present Pierre Berge's charitable fund and to install the committee to support the fight against AIDS in Paris October 27, 2009. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE ENTERTAINMENT)
FRANCE/
RTXQ1WT
October 27, 2009
Pierre Berge (2nd R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses...
Paris, France
Pierre Berge, French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses before...
Pierre Berge (2nd R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses with French professor Yves Levy (L), French singer and actress Line Renaud (2nd L) and French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize Francoise Barre-Sinoussi before a news conference to present Pierre Berge's charitable fund and to install the committee to support the fight against AIDS in Paris October 27, 2009. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE ENTERTAINMENT)
FRANCE/
RTXQ1WS
October 27, 2009
Pierre Berge (2nd R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses...
Paris, France
Pierre Berge, French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses before...
Pierre Berge (2nd R), French businessman and partner of late fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent, poses with French professor Yves Levy (L), French singer and actress Line Renaud (2nd L) and French virologist and 2008 Medicine Nobel Prize Francoise Barre-Sinoussi before a news conference to present Pierre Berge's charitable found and to install the committee to support the fight against AIDS in Paris October 27, 2009. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE ENTERTAINMENT)
NOBEL/
RTR22GMN
December 10, 2008
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's...
Stockholm, Sweden
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's...
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. From right to left are: Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf, Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, Martin Chalfie, Crown Princess Victoria, Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clezio and Princess Christina. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GKH
December 10, 2008
Medicine Nobel Prize winner Francoise Barre-Sinoussi talks to Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf at the Nobel...
Stockholm, Sweden
Medicine Nobel Prize winner Barre-Sinoussi talks to Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf at the Nobel banquet...
Medicine Nobel Prize winner Francoise Barre-Sinoussi talks to Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf at the Nobel banquet at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GK2
December 10, 2008
Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf escorts Nobel Medicine winner Francoise Barre-Sinoussi as they arrive to...
Stockholm, Sweden
Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf escorts Nobel Medicine winner Barre-Sinoussi as they arrive to the Nobel...
Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf escorts Nobel Medicine winner Francoise Barre-Sinoussi as they arrive to the Nobel banquet at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GH8
December 10, 2008
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier of France attend the 2008 Nobel Prize ceremony at the...
Stockholm, Sweden
Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier of France attend the 2008 Nobel Prize ceremony at the Concert Hall in Stockholm...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier of France attend the 2008 Nobel Prize ceremony at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France awarded one half for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus" and Harold zur Hausen of Germany awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GFZ
December 10, 2008
Luc Montagnier of France reacts receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm...
Stockholm, Sweden
Montagnier of France reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine in Stockholm
Luc Montagnier of France reacts receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with Montagnier and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France awarded one half for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus" and Harold zur Hausen of Germany awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GFL
December 10, 2008
Luc Montagnier of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf...
Stockholm, Sweden
Montagnier of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf in...
Luc Montagnier of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with Montagnier and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France awarded one half for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus" and Harold zur Hausen of Germany awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GFG
December 10, 2008
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert...
Stockholm, Sweden
Barre-Sinoussi of France reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France awarded one half for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus" and Harold zur Hausen of Germany awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GFE
December 10, 2008
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl...
Stockholm, Sweden
Barre-Sinoussi of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of France receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France awarded one half for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus" and Harold zur Hausen of Germany awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GFC
December 10, 2008
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall...
Stockholm, Sweden
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall...
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with zur Hausen awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and one half shared by Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GF9
December 10, 2008
Harald zur Hausen of Germany receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf...
Stockholm, Sweden
Harald zur Hausen of Germany receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf...
Harald zur Hausen of Germany receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with zur Hausen awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and one half shared by Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR22GF6
December 10, 2008
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall...
Stockholm, Sweden
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall...
Harald zur Hausen of Germany reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The medicine prize was given to three researchers, with zur Hausen awarded one half for his discovery of "human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and one half shared by Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier of France for their discovery of the "human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR22BJM
December 06, 2008
French scientist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, who shares the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology...
Stockholm, Sweden
French scientist Barre-Sinoussi, who shares the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology with compatriot...
French scientist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, who shares the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology with compatriot Luc Montagnier for their discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, speaks during a news conference in Stockholm December 6, 2008. The Nobel awards will be presented at a ceremony in Stockholm on December 10. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR22BJH
December 06, 2008
Winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology, French scientists Luc Montagnier (L-R) and...
Stockholm, Sweden
Winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology pose before a news conference in Stockholm...
Winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology, French scientists Luc Montagnier (L-R) and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi for their discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, and German scientist Harald zur Hausen for his work into the cause of cervical cancer, pose before a news conference in Stockholm December 6, 2008. The Nobel awards will be presented at a ceremony in Stockholm on December 10. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CE9
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference at UNESCO...
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference at UNESCO headquarters in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CE3
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi attends a news conference at UNESCO headquarters in Paris,...
Paris, France
2008 Nobel Prize winner for medicine, French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi attends a news conference...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi attends a news conference at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CDY
October 08, 2008
French scientist Luc Montagnier speaks at a news conference at UNESCO's headquarters in Paris October...
Paris, France
French scientist Montagnier speaks at a news conference at UNESCO's headquarters in Paris
French scientist Luc Montagnier speaks at a news conference at UNESCO's headquarters in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CDG
October 08, 2008
French scientists Luc Montagnier (L) and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi walk in the courtyard at the Elysee...
Paris, France
French scientists Montagnier and Barre-Sinoussi leave the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Luc Montagnier (L) and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi walk in the courtyard at the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CD8
October 08, 2008
French scientists Luc Montagnier (L) and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi walk in the courtyard at the Elysee...
Paris, France
French scientists Montagnier and Barre-Sinoussi leave the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Luc Montagnier (L) and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi walk in the courtyard at the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CCN
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier meet with France's President Nicolas...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier meet with France's President Sarkozy at the Elysee Palace...
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier meet with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy (R) at the Elysee Palace in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Michel Euler (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CBA
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier speak to the media in the courtyard...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier speak outside the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier speak to the media in the courtyard at the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CB6
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier descend the steps at the Elysee Palace...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier leave the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier descend the steps at the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CB0
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier descend the steps at the Elysee Palace...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier leave the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier descend the steps at the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CAW
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier shake hands in the courtyard of the...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier shake hands outside the Elysee Palace in Paris
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) and Luc Montagnier shake hands in the courtyard of the Elysee Palace after a meeting with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9CAO
October 08, 2008
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference...
Paris, France
French scientists Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference at the UNESCO's...
French scientists Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (L) and Luc Montagnier pose for the media during a news conference at the UNESCO's headquarters in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BWM
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BWK
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BWF
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with the media before a news conference at the...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BW9
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BW3
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BW1
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BW0
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi poses for the media before a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BVY
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (C) arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (C) arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX9BVT
October 08, 2008
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (C) arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur...
Paris, France
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris...
French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (C) arrives for a news conference at the Institut Pasteur in Paris October 8, 2008. Two French scientists who discovered the AIDS virus and a German who bucked conventional wisdom to find a virus that causes cervical cancer were awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for medicine on Monday October 6, 2008. Luc Montagnier, director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, and Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur won half the prize of 10 million Swedish crowns ($1.4 million) for discovering the virus that has killed 25 million people since it was identified in the 1980s. REUTERS/ Benoit Tessier (FRANCE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX99BH
October 06, 2008
Professor Harald zur Hausen, joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, smiles during a...
Heidelberg, Germany
Professor zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008 smiles during news conference...
Professor Harald zur Hausen, joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, smiles during a news conference at the German cancer research center of the university in Heidelberg October 6, 2008. Germany's Harald zur Hausen and French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Hausen won "for his discovery of human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier "for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Alex Grimm (GERMANY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX99B4
October 06, 2008
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, poses in front of...
Heidelberg, Germany
German professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008 poses in front...
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, poses in front of the cancer research center of the university in Heidelberg October 6, 2008. Germany's Harald zur Hausen and French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Hausen won "for his discovery of human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier "for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Alex Grimm (GERMANY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX99B0
October 06, 2008
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, gestures during...
Heidelberg, Germany
German professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008 attends reception...
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, gestures during a reception at the cancer research center of the university in Heidelberg October 6, 2008. Germany's Harald zur Hausen and French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Hausen won "for his discovery of human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier "for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Alex Grimm (GERMANY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX99AA
October 06, 2008
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, poses in a laboratory...
Heidelberg, Germany
German professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008 poses in a...
Professor Harald zur Hausen joint Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine 2008, poses in a laboratory at the cancer research center of the university in Heidelberg October 6, 2008. Germany's Harald zur Hausen and French researchers Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Hausen won "for his discovery of human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer" and Barre-Sinoussi and Montagnier "for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus". REUTERS/Alex Grimm (GERMANY)
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