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Search results for: Bacterium

USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS
RTX2V6RZ 
December 15, 2016 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated... 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated from soil the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin, holds a bag of dirt sent to the lab by a citizen-scientist at NovoBiotic's labs in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., November 22, 2016. To match Special Report USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS
RTX2V6RV 
December 15, 2016 
A microscope shows the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin,... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
A microscope shows the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin,... 
A microscope shows the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin, in NovoBiotic's labs in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., November 22, 2016. To match Special Report USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS
RTX2V6RO 
December 15, 2016 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated... 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals and who isolated from soil the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin, holds bags of dirt sent to the lab by a citizen-scientist at NovoBiotic's labs in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., November 22, 2016. To match Special Report USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS
RTX2V6RM 
December 15, 2016 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals, holds up a sample... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals, holds up a sample... 
Amy Spoering, Director of Biological Research at the biotech NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals, holds up a sample of the bacterium Eleftheria terrae, the basis for the promising new antibiotic Teixobactin, at NovoBiotic's labs in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., November 22, 2016. To match Special Report USA-UNCOUNTED/DRUGS REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
ASIAPAC-AIDS/YOUTH
RTX1WLOW 
December 01, 2015 
Discarded heroin syringes are stuck into a banana tree after they were used by addicts in Hanoi, Vietnam,... 
Hanoi, Viet Nam 
Discarded heroin syringes are stuck into a banana tree after they were used by addicts in Hanoi 
Discarded heroin syringes are stuck into a banana tree after they were used by addicts in Hanoi, Vietnam, December 1, 2015. Some of the syringes are re-used by poorer addicts. The estimated number of adolescents dying of AIDS in the Asia Pacific region has more than doubled since 2005, experts said on Monday, warning of a "hidden epidemic". REUTERS/Kham TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
OLYMPICS-BRAZIL/BACTERIA
RTR4I9NB 
December 16, 2014 
The waters of Rio Carioca, in which scientists discovered a new bacteria, are pictured running into the... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
The waters of Rio Carioca, in which scientists discovered a new bacteria, are pictured running into the... 
The waters of Rio Carioca, in which scientists discovered a new bacteria, are pictured running into the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro December 16, 2014. Scientists at a Rio de Janeiro research institute have found what they call a new "super-bacteria" that is resistant to antibiotics in the waters where sailors will compete in the Olympic sailing events in 2016. The bacteria is normally found in hospital waste and can cause urinary, gastrointestinal and pulmonary infections, officials with the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation said on Monday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS ENVIRONMENT) 
PFIZER-VACCINE/
RTXZXDP 
May 23, 2013 
Kathrin Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses... 
PEARL RIVER, UNITED STATES 
Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses in her lab... 
Kathrin Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses for a portrait in one of her labs at Pfizer headquarters in Pearl River, New York, April 19, 2013. Jansen is a microbiologist with at least two breakthrough vaccines to her name: she brought the cervical cancer vaccine Gardasil to market for Merck and helped develop the $4 billion a year pneumonia and meningitis vaccine Prevnar 13 for Pfizer. Jansen's next vaccine success could come by taming the superbug MRSA, a drug-resistant bacterium that she has seen ravage a healthy man up close and personally. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infects an estimated 53 million people globally and costs more than $20 billion a year to treat. Picture taken April 19, 2013. To match Feature PFIZER-VACCINE/ REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH) 
PFIZER-VACCINE/
RTXZXDO 
May 23, 2013 
Kathrin Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses... 
PEARL RIVER, UNITED STATES 
Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses in her lab... 
Kathrin Jansen, senior vice president of Vaccine Research and Early Development at Pfizer Inc, poses for a portrait in one of her labs at Pfizer headquarters in Pearl River, New York, April 19, 2013. Jansen is a microbiologist with at least two breakthrough vaccines to her name: she brought the cervical cancer vaccine Gardasil to market for Merck and helped develop the $4 billion a year pneumonia and meningitis vaccine Prevnar 13 for Pfizer. Jansen's next vaccine success could come by taming the superbug MRSA, a drug-resistant bacterium that she has seen ravage a healthy man up close and personally. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infects an estimated 53 million people globally and costs more than $20 billion a year to treat. Picture taken April 19, 2013. To match Feature PFIZER-VACCINE/ REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH) 
BACTERIA-STOOL/TREATMENT
RTR3B1MJ 
November 30, 2012 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Hamilton, Canada 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, November 22, 2012. Drugmakers racing to develop medicines and vaccines to combat a germ that ravages the gut and kills thousands have a new challenger: the human stool. For patients hit hardest by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known as C. diff, getting a "stool transplant" could become a standard treatment within just a few years. Lee has more performed than 100 of the experimental procedure that is proving to be a godsend to patients. The five-minute bedside procedure cured the infection and prevented recurrences in 90 percent of patients, said Lee. Picture taken November 22, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (CANADA - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH) 
BACTERIA-STOOL/TREATMENT
RTR3B1MI 
November 30, 2012 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Hamilton, Canada 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, November 22, 2012. Drugmakers racing to develop medicines and vaccines to combat a germ that ravages the gut and kills thousands have a new challenger: the human stool. For patients hit hardest by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known as C. diff, getting a "stool transplant" could become a standard treatment within just a few years. Lee has more performed than 100 of the experimental procedure that is proving to be a godsend to patients. The five-minute bedside procedure cured the infection and prevented recurrences in 90 percent of patients, said Lee. Picture taken November 22, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (CANADA - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH) 
BACTERIA-STOOL/TREATMENT
RTR3B1MH 
November 30, 2012 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Hamilton, Canada 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, November 22, 2012. Drugmakers racing to develop medicines and vaccines to combat a germ that ravages the gut and kills thousands have a new challenger: the human stool. For patients hit hardest by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known as C. diff, getting a "stool transplant" could become a standard treatment within just a few years. Lee has more performed than 100 of the experimental procedure that is proving to be a godsend to patients. The five-minute bedside procedure cured the infection and prevented recurrences in 90 percent of patients, said Lee. Picture taken November 22, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (CANADA - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH) 
BACTERIA-STOOL/TREATMENT
RTR3B1MG 
November 30, 2012 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Hamilton, Canada 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital)... 
Dr. Christine Lee, an infectious disease physician, poses in a lab at St. Joseph's Healthcare (hospital) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, November 22, 2012. Drugmakers racing to develop medicines and vaccines to combat a germ that ravages the gut and kills thousands have a new challenger: the human stool. For patients hit hardest by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known as C. diff, getting a "stool transplant" could become a standard treatment within just a few years. Lee has more performed than 100 of the experimental procedure that is proving to be a godsend to patients. The five-minute bedside procedure cured the infection and prevented recurrences in 90 percent of patients, said Lee. Picture taken November 22, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Cassese (CANADA - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH) 
YELLOWSTONE/
RTR2O7QH 
June 28, 2011 
The Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest in the United States and third largest in the world, and it's... 
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, UNITED STATES 
The Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest in the United States and third largest in the world, and it's... 
The Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest in the United States and third largest in the world, and it's colored bacteria and microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, June 22, 2011. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES) 
GERMANY/
RTR2N77B 
June 02, 2011 
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.)... 
Hamburg, Germany 
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological laboratory... 
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Clinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg, June 2, 2011. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
GERMANY/
RTR2N774 
June 02, 2011 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria strains in the microbiological laboratory of the... 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg, June 2, 2011. A deadly outbreak of E.coli centred in Germany and spreading across Europe is caused by a dangerous new strain, Chinese scientists who analysed the bacteria said. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
GERMANY/
RTR2N76U 
June 02, 2011 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria strains in the microbiological laboratory of the... 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg, June 2, 2011. A deadly outbreak of E.coli centred in Germany and spreading across Europe is caused by a dangerous new strain, Chinese scientists who analysed the bacteria said. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
GERMANY/
RTR2N76N 
June 02, 2011 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria strains in the microbiological laboratory of the... 
An employee examines a stool sample for EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli) strains in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg, June 2, 2011. A deadly outbreak of E.coli centred in Germany and spreading across Europe is caused by a dangerous new strain, Chinese scientists who analysed the bacteria said. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5VI 
June 01, 2011 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5VB 
June 01, 2011 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5V0 
June 01, 2011 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5UW 
June 01, 2011 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5UR 
June 01, 2011 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5UL 
June 01, 2011 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular... 
An employee of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepares samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
CZECH/
RTR2N5UH 
June 01, 2011 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Brno, Czech Republic 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular... 
Employees of Czech center of national reference laboratories prepare samples of vegetables for molecular testing on EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in Brno June 1, 2011. Samples of vegetables imported from various countries are tested for E.Coli at the laboratory. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLICAGRICULTURE DRINK TECH - Tags: AGRICULTURE HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD) 
RTR2N59D 
June 01, 2011 
GERMANY-ECOLI/UPDATE - Map of Europe detailing nations effected by a E. coli outbreak. RNGS. (SIN01) 
Berlin, Germany 
GERMANY-ECOLI/UPDATE C 
GERMANY-ECOLI/UPDATE - Map of Europe detailing nations effected by a E. coli outbreak. RNGS. (SIN01) 
RTR2N3ZR 
May 31, 2011 
GERMANY-ECOLI/ - Map of Europe detailing nations effected by a E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated... 
Berlin, Germany 
GERMANY-ECOLI/ C 
GERMANY-ECOLI/ - Map of Europe detailing nations effected by a E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated cucumbers. RNGS. (SIN04) 
Health
Health 
Deadly E. Coli Outbreak in Europe - 10 Jun 2011 
149 PICTURES 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUY 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUW 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUT 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUR 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUQ 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUM 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUI 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays stool sample with EHEC bacteria strain in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic... 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUG 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays stool sample with EHEC bacteria strain in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic... 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUD 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee displays stool sample with EHEC bacteria strain in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic... 
An employee displays a stool sample with EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTTF 
May 24, 2011 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Employee display sEHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern... 
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH) 
ANTIBIOTICS
RTR2KMX3 
March 31, 2011 
A sample bottle containing E. coli bacteria is seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March... 
London, United Kingdom 
To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ 
A sample bottle containing E. coli bacteria is seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March 9, 2011. For decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of the ever-mutating enemy, bacteria. Now, though, we may be running out of road. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe, and other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Picture taken March 9, 2011. To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
ANTIBIOTICS
RTR2KMWV 
March 31, 2011 
Two plates which were coated with an antibiotic-resistant bacteria called Klebsiella with a mutation... 
London, United Kingdom 
To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ 
Two plates which were coated with an antibiotic-resistant bacteria called Klebsiella with a mutation called NDM 1 and then exposed to various antibiotics are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March 9, 2011. The clear areas in the top left quarter of the plate on left show that the Klebsiella with NDM 1 was sensitive to the respective antibiotics tigecycline (manufactured by Pfizer under the trade name Tygacil) and colistin. For decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of the ever-mutating enemy, bacteria. Now, though, we may be running out of road. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe, and other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Picture taken March 9, 2011. To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
ANTIBIOTICS
RTR2KMWQ 
March 31, 2011 
Test tubes filled with samples of bacteria to be tested are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north... 
London, United Kingdom 
To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ 
Test tubes filled with samples of bacteria to be tested are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March 9, 2011. Picture taken March 9, 2011. For decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of the ever-mutating enemy, bacteria. Now, though, we may be running out of road. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe, and other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Picture taken March 9, 2011. To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
ANTIBIOTICS
RTR2KMWP 
March 31, 2011 
Test tubes filled with samples of bacteria to be tested are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north... 
London, United Kingdom 
To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ 
Test tubes filled with samples of bacteria to be tested are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March 9, 2011. Picture taken March 9, 2011. For decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of the ever-mutating enemy, bacteria. Now, though, we may be running out of road. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe, and other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Picture taken March 9, 2011. To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
RTXVCDA 
December 03, 2010 
ARSENIC-BACTERIA/ - Location map of California's Mono Lake where scientists have discovered a bacteria... 
US 
ARSENIC-BACTERIA C 
ARSENIC-BACTERIA/ - Location map of California's Mono Lake where scientists have discovered a bacteria that thrives on arsenic. RNGS. (SIN03) 
TAIWAN/
RTXT0VC 
October 04, 2010 
Taiwan's Deputy Chief of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Shih Wen-yi gives a news conference in... 
Taipei, Taiwan 
Taiwan's Deputy Chief of the Center for Disease Control Shih Wen-yi gives a news conference in Taipei... 
Taiwan's Deputy Chief of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Shih Wen-yi gives a news conference in Taipei October 4, 2010. Taiwan on Monday announced its findings that one of two men who had been shot in India in September is carrying the first drug-resistant 'superbug' NDM-1 bacterium. Shih said that the bacterium is not contagious. The two men were wounded when gunmen on motorbikes shot at a tourist bus near the Jama Masjid in Delhi. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang (TAIWAN - Tags: HEALTH) 
GERMANY/
RTR1XRWF 
March 01, 2008 
MRSA (Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish containing... 
Berlin, Germany 
MRSA bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish in a microbiological laboratory in Berlin 
MRSA (Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish containing a special jelly for bacterial culture in a microbiological laboratory in Berlin March 1, 2008. MRSA is a drug-resistant "superbug", which can cause deadly infections. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY) 
GERMANY/
RTR1XRUZ 
March 01, 2008 
MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish containing... 
Berlin, Germany 
MRSA bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish in a microbiological laboratory in Berlin 
MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in a microbiological laboratory in Berlin March 1, 2008. MRSA is a drug-resistant "superbug", which can cause deadly infections. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY) 
SWEDEN NOBEL
RTR1APRX 
December 10, 2005 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine at the Concert... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine in Stockholm 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2005. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Australians Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren for their discovery of "the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease". REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski 
SWEDEN NOBEL
RTR1APM0 
December 10, 2005 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine at the Concert... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine in Stockholm... 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall holds the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2005. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Australians Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren for their discovery of "the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease". REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski 
SWEDEN NOBEL
RTR1APJ5 
December 10, 2005 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish... 
Australian nobel laureate J. Robin Warren receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish King Carl Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2005. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Australians Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren for their discovery of "the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease". In background is a bust of the award's founder Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite, Alfred Nobel. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski 
SWEDEN NOBEL
RTR1AOP1 
December 10, 2005 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish... 
Australian nobel laureate Barry J. Marshall receives the joint 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine from Swedish King Carl Gustaf at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2005. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Australians Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren for their discovery of "the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease". In background is a bust of the award's founder Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite, Alfred Nobel. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski 
AUSTRALIA
RTXNU6N 
October 03, 2005 
Nobel Prize for Medicine recipients, Australians Robin Warren (L) and Barry Marshall toast their success... 
Perth, Australia 
Nobel Prize for Medicine recipients, Australians Robin Warren (L) and Barry Marshall toast their suc..... 
Nobel Prize for Medicine recipients, Australians Robin Warren (L) and Barry Marshall toast their success with a champagne at Swan Berry Cafe in Perth October 3, 2005 after learning of their achievements. Warren and Marshall won the 2005 Nobel medicine prize on Monday for discovering the bacterium behind stomach inflammation and ulcers, diseases which affect millions of people and earn billions of dollars for drugs firms. 
CHINA
RTXNPSR 
August 23, 2005 
A Chinese vendor prepares pork at a market in Shanghai August 23, 2005. [China's far south is on high... 
Shanghai, China 
A Chinese vendor prepares pork at a market in Shanghai August 23, 2005. [China's far south is on hig..... 
A Chinese vendor prepares pork at a market in Shanghai August 23, 2005. [China's far south is on high alert since one person was killed and three infected by a pig-borne disease that had left nearly 40 dead in the southwest, suggesting dangerous meat is being traded across the country. The latest person killed by the disease, caused by the Streptococcus suis bacterium, had handled infected pork, Xinhua news agency said on Tuesday, and the three other victims, all butchers, also likely had contact with tainted meat.] 
HEALTH CHINA
RTRLBSU 
August 23, 2005 
A Chinese vendor prepares pork at a market in Shanghai August 23, 2005. China's far south is on high... 
Shanghai, China 
Chinese vendor prepares pork at market in Shanghai. 
A Chinese vendor prepares pork at a market in Shanghai August 23, 2005. China's far south is on high alert since one person was killed and three infected by a pig-borne disease that had left nearly 40 dead in the southwest, suggesting dangerous meat is being traded across the country. The latest person killed by the disease, caused by the Streptococcus suis bacterium, had handled infected pork, Xinhua news agency said on Tuesday, and the three other victims, all butchers, also likely had contact with tainted meat. REUTERS/Aly Song CC/DY 
MEXICO INFANT
RTR3HI6 
September 23, 2003 
A mother awaits a check-up with her healthy baby in the corridors of
the Primero de Octubre hospital... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
MOTHER AWAITING A CHECK UP AT MEXICO CITY HOSPITAL. 
A mother awaits a check-up with her healthy baby in the corridors of
the Primero de Octubre hospital in Mexico City, September 23, 2003. A
deadly bacterium that weakens the immune system has already killed six
babies at the hospital over the last three weeks. REUTERS/Henry Romero

HR 
MEXICO INFANT
RTR3HHZ 
September 23, 2003 
A nurse attends to a seven-month-old infant infected with a deadly
bacterium that weakens the immune... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
SICK INFANT AT THE PRIMERO DE OCTUBRE HOSPITAL. 
A nurse attends to a seven-month-old infant infected with a deadly
bacterium that weakens the immune system and has already killed six
babies over the last three weeks in the Primero de Octubre hospital in
Mexico City, September 23, 2003. The infant is in critical condition.
REUTERS/Henry Romero

HR 
BULGARIA
RTXLXA2 
April 29, 2003 
-PHOTO TAKEN 03APR03- A Bulgarian researcher holds a bottle of yoghurt starter culture produced by private... 
Sofia, Bulgaria 
-PHOTO TAKEN 03APR03- A Bulgarian researcher holds a bottle of yoghurt starter culture produced by p..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 03APR03- A Bulgarian researcher holds a bottle of yoghurt starter culture produced by private company Lactina Ltd., in the outskirts of the capital Sofia. Bulgaria proudly claims to have invented yoghurt and given the world lactobacillus bulgaricus, the bacterium that curdles milk, and the secret to a long life. [It wasn't till the early 1900s that Russian scientist Ilya Mechnikov, a 1908 Nobel Prize winner, linked yoghurt with longevity. He compiled statistics from 36 countries to discover more people lived to the age of 100 in Bulgaria than in any other - four in every thousand - and attributed this to the regular consumption of yoghurt.] Picture taken April 3, 2003. 
BULGARIA YOGHURT
RTRMLUC 
April 03, 2003 
A Bulgarian researcher holds a bottle of yoghurt starter culture
produced by private company Lactina... 
Sofia, Bulgaria - Republic of 
TO MATCH FEATURE BC-BULGARIA-YOGHURT. 
A Bulgarian researcher holds a bottle of yoghurt starter culture
produced by private company Lactina Ltd., in the outskirts of the
capital Sofia. Bulgaria proudly claims to have invented yoghurt and
given the world lactobacillus bulgaricus, the bacterium that curdles
milk, and the secret to a long life. It wasn't till the early 1900s
that Russian scientist Ilya Mechnikov, a 1908 Nobel Prize winner,
linked yoghurt with longevity. He compiled statistics from 36 countries
to discover more people lived to the age of 100 in Bulgaria than in any
other - four in every thousand - and attributed this to the regular
consumption of yoghurt. Picture taken April 3, 2003 TO GO WITH FEATURE
BC - BULGARIA - YOGHURT REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov REUTERS

SN/CRB 
CRIME ABORTION
RTRQ3EA 
December 05, 2001 
Fugitive Clayton Lee Waagner, wanted by the FBI for allegedly mailing
anthrax hoax letters to abortion... 
Washington, United States of America 
FBI WANTED POSTER OF CLAYTON LEE WAAGNER. 
Fugitive Clayton Lee Waagner, wanted by the FBI for allegedly mailing
anthrax hoax letters to abortion clinics, was arrested in the
Cincinnati, Ohio area, federal law enforcement officials said on
December 5, 2001. They said Waagner, who claimed responsibility for
sending more than 280 letters purporting to contain the potentially
deadly bacterium to East Coast clinics that perform abortions, was
taken into custody by local law enforcement authorities. Waagner is
shown in this FBI Wanted poster. REUTERS/FBI/Handout

HK/SV 
SAFRICA ANTHRAX
RTRO89Y 
October 17, 2001 
Disaster management officials investigate an Anthrax scare after
sealing off the Claremont police station... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
DISASTER MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS INVESTIGATE AN ANTHRAX SCARE IN CAPE
TOWN. 
Disaster management officials investigate an Anthrax scare after
sealing off the Claremont police station in Cape Town, October 17,
2001. Police were earlier contacted after a man had reported recieving
a suspicious parcel containing an unknown substance. Fears of
bio-terrorist attacks have increased worldwide after after one person
died and 13 people were found to have been exposed to the bacterium in
the United States. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings REUTERS

MH/ 
SAFRICA ANTHRAX
RTRO89T 
October 17, 2001 
Disaster management officials investigate an Anthrax scare after
sealing off the Claremont police station... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
DISASTER MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS INVESTIGATE AN ANTHRAX SCARE IN CAPE
TOWN. 
Disaster management officials investigate an Anthrax scare after
sealing off the Claremont police station in Cape Town, October 17,
2001. Police were earlier contacted after a man had reported recieving
a suspicious parcel containing an unknown substance. Fears of
bio-terrorist attacks have increased worldwide after after one person
died and 13 people were found to have been exposed to the bacterium in
the United States. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

MH/ 
RTR28I6 
March 06, 1997 
Minister for Agriculture Douglas Hogg leaves 10 Downing Street on crutches after a Cabinet meeting March... 
United Kingdom 
DOUGLAS HOGG LEAVES DOWNING STREET AFTER A CABINET MEETING 
Minister for Agriculture Douglas Hogg leaves 10 Downing Street on crutches after a Cabinet meeting March 6. Hogg will make a statement later today in the Commons concerning an unpublished report on Britain's meat industry, which warned a year ago that poor hygiene was putting the public at increasing risk of infection from the bacterium E.coli.

BRITAIN 
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