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Search results for: Baotou-(City)

CHINA-COAL/POWER
RTS140CF
April 26, 2017
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's...
Baotou, China
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's...
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray/File Photo
CHINA-PARLIAMENT/COAL
RTX311RI
March 15, 2017
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's...
Baotou, China
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's...
FILE PHOTO: A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray/File Photo
CHINA-ECONOMY/INDUSTRIAL-PROFITS
RTSPKVR
September 27, 2016
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray/File Photo
CLIMATECHANGE-TEMPERATURES/
RTSMVQ1
August 12, 2016
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray/File Photo
CHINA/
RTXX6CB
January 28, 2011
A passenger sleeps in a train from Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, to Baotou, a city in the Inner Mongolia...
Beijing, China
A passenger sleeps in a train from Nanchang to Baotou at the Beijing West Railway Station
A passenger sleeps in a train from Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, to Baotou, a city in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, at the Beijing West Railway Station January 28, 2011. January 19 marked the beginning of the annual Spring Festival travel rush, with an expected 2.56 billion passenger trips in the coming 40 days. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY TRANSPORT)
CHINA/
RTXX6CA
January 28, 2011
A passenger stands next to the window of a train from Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, to Baotou, a city in...
Beijing, China
A passenger stands next to the window of a train from Nanchang to Baotou at the Beijing West Railway...
A passenger stands next to the window of a train from Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, to Baotou, a city in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, at the Beijing West Railway Station January 28, 2011. January 19 marked the beginning of the annual Spring Festival travel rush, with an expected 2.56 billion passenger trips in the coming 40 days. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: TRANSPORT SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59K
November 03, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59I
November 03, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel underneath a pipeline that transports crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59H
November 03, 2010
A villager who said she suffers sore eyes, chest pains and difficulty breathing, walks through Xinguang...
Baotou, China
A villager who said she suffers sore eyes, chest pains and difficulty breathing, walks through Xinguang...
A villager who said she suffers sore eyes, chest pains and difficulty breathing, walks through Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59G
November 03, 2010
A villager, seen behind a field of dead crops, shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that...
Baotou, China
A villager, seen behind a field of dead crops, shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that...
A villager, seen behind a field of dead crops, shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59D
November 03, 2010
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant as he takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings...
Baotou, China
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of...
A villager looks towards a rare earth smelting plant as he takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU59B
November 03, 2010
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang...
Baotou, China
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang...
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU598
November 03, 2010
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of...
Baotou, China
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of...
A villager shovels cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals in front of a rare earth smelting plant in Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU597
November 03, 2010
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth...
Baotou, China
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth...
A stray dog lies on dunes made from cast-off tailings of crushed mineral ore that contain rare earth metals near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU595
November 03, 2010
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village,...
Baotou, China
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village,...
Stairs lead down into a vast tailings dam that contains heavily polluted water near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU592
November 03, 2010
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant...
Baotou, China
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant...
Chimneys from a rare earth smelting plant are seen on the shores of a vast tailings dam that the plant spews heavily polluted water into near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU590
November 03, 2010
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing...
Baotou, China
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing...
Local villagers and a rare earth smelting plant are obscured by thick smoke in front of a wall bearing the banner that reads "Be at the vanguard of rare earths' business, create the mother ship for Chinese rare earths" near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58X
November 03, 2010
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Baotou, China
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58W
November 03, 2010
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Baotou, China
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang...
Pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant spew polluted water into a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in this October 31, 2010 picture. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58V
November 03, 2010
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast...
Baotou, China
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast...
Villagers sit near a rubbish dump located in front of a rare earth smelting plant and next to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58S
November 03, 2010
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near...
Baotou, China
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near...
Workers walk through thick haze in front of a rare earth smelting plant next to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58Q
November 03, 2010
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast...
Baotou, China
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast...
Workers walk through thick haze along pipes coming from a rare earth smelting plant and lead to a vast tailings dam near Xinguang Village, located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58N
November 03, 2010
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant...
Baotou, China
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant...
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58L
November 03, 2010
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant...
Baotou, China
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant...
Workers wearing face masks load discarded piles of sacks onto a truck at a rare earth smelting plant located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The massive Baogang corporation, located on the outskirts of Baotou city, churns out rare earth metals on a vast scale, and villagers living near the smelting plants and a vast tailings dam used to dump the black refuse from ore processing said the rare earths boom was threatening their livelihood and health. Air and water toxins from the plants and dam were poisoning them, their water, crops and children, they said. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-RAREEARTHS/
RTXU58G
November 03, 2010
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia...
The chimney of a rare earth metals factory billows smoke near the town of Damao, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA/COAL
RTXU3Y1
November 02, 2010
A factory worker stands next to a coal-burning fire under metal at a factory in an industrial area located...
Baotou, China
Factory worker stands next to coal-burning fire at factory in an industrial area located on the outskirts...
A factory worker stands next to a coal-burning fire under metal at a factory in an industrial area located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China plans to limit its coal output and step up mines consolidation in its next five-year plan though power capacity is expected to exceed 1.4 billion kilowatts by the middle of the next decade, local media reported. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/COAL
RTXU3XV
November 02, 2010
A man loads a motorised cart with coal on a street in the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous...
Baotou, China
A man loads a motorised cart with coal on a street in the city of Baotou
A man loads a motorised cart with coal on a street in the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China plans to limit its coal output and step up mines consolidation in its next five-year plan though power capacity is expected to exceed 1.4 billion kilowatts by the middle of the next decade, local media reported. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/COAL
RTXU3XU
November 02, 2010
A worker uses a welder on a pipeline at a coal refinery in the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
A worker uses a welder on a pipeline at a coal refinery in the city of Baotou
A worker uses a welder on a pipeline at a coal refinery in the city of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China plans to limit its coal output and step up mines consolidation in its next five-year plan though power capacity is expected to exceed 1.4 billion kilowatts by the middle of the next decade, local media reported. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-
RTXU2RW
November 01, 2010
Coal trucks drive along a road leading to a mine located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou, in China's...
Baotou, China
Coal trucks drive along a road leading to a mine located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou, in China's...
Coal trucks drive along a road leading to a mine located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China's $736-billion push to harness nuclear, wind, solar and biomass energy hinges on making the cleaner fuels competitive with cheap and CO2-intensive coal without derailing surging industrial growth. The world's second-largest economy faces formidable challenges to make the plan work, with the upgrade to its rickety electricity grid needed, and the opening up of the network to alternative energy and raise tariffs to make new energy sources competitive with coal-fired power. The aim is to cut carbon intensity as much as 45 percent from 2005 levels by 2020 and increase the share of renewables to 15 percent of primary energy consumption. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-
RTXU2RP
November 01, 2010
A factory worker walks past a pile of coal in an industrial area located on the outskirts of the city...
Baotou, China
A factory worker walks past a pile of coal in an industrial area located on the outskirts of the city...
A factory worker walks past a pile of coal in an industrial area located on the outskirts of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China's $736-billion push to harness nuclear, wind, solar and biomass energy hinges on making the cleaner fuels competitive with cheap and CO2-intensive coal without derailing surging industrial growth. The world's second-largest economy faces formidable challenges to make the plan work, with the upgrade to its rickety electricity grid needed, and the opening up of the network to alternative energy and raise tariffs to make new energy sources competitive with coal-fired power. The aim is to cut carbon intensity as much as 45 percent from 2005 levels by 2020 and increase the share of renewables to 15 percent of primary energy consumption. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-
RTXU2RM
November 01, 2010
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
Baotou, China
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia...
A coal-burning power plant can be seen behind a factory in the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. China's $736-billion push to harness nuclear, wind, solar and biomass energy hinges on making the cleaner fuels competitive with cheap and CO2-intensive coal without derailing surging industrial growth. The world's second-largest economy faces formidable challenges to make the plan work, with the upgrade to its rickety electricity grid needed, and the opening up of the network to alternative energy and raise tariffs to make new energy sources competitive with coal-fired power. The aim is to cut carbon intensity as much as 45 percent from 2005 levels by 2020 and increase the share of renewables to 15 percent of primary energy consumption. Picture taken October 31, 2010. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA/
RTXU1HY
October 31, 2010
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing...
Baotou, China
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing...
A worker behind a wall shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HW
October 31, 2010
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HV
October 31, 2010
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker (C) shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HR
October 31, 2010
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
Baotou, China
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths...
A worker shovels cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HO
October 31, 2010
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
Baotou, China
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HM
October 31, 2010
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
multiple cities, China
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore...
A worker takes a break from shovelling cast-off tailings out of a channel sluicing crushed mineral ore containing rare earths to a disposal dam on the edge of the city of Baotou, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The sludge has been rejected by large rare earth smelters nearby but workers sell it for around 300 Yuan ($45) per tonne to smaller operators eager for a slice of China's rare earth metals business - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTXU1HG
October 31, 2010
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory...
Baotou, China
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory...
Workers can be seen through smog as they walk along a pipeline coming from a nearby rare earth factory in the city of Baotou, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region October 31, 2010. The factory refines China's rare earth metals - a market that China has a near monopoly on by producing 97 percent of the world's supply, and having around 87 percent of all known deposits. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTX4BOT
December 03, 2007
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed...
Baotou, China
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, shakes hands with He Pingping, 19, a 0.73-metre (2 feet, 5 inches) tall man, in Baotou, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. He is applying for the Guinness World Record as the world's shortest man, local media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA-TALLEST/
RTR1RSKE
July 13, 2007
Bao Xishun (R), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records...
Baotou, China
Bao Xishun and his wife Xia Shujuan leave in Baotou
Bao Xishun (R), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, and his wife Xia Shujuan, 29, 1.68 metres (5 ft., 5 inches) tall, leave after a news conference in Baotou in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. The world's tallest man, whose search for a bride covered the world, ended up marrying a woman from his hometown nearly half his age and more than two feet shorter, Chinese media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA-TALLEST/
RTR1RSKC
July 13, 2007
Bao Xishun (R), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records...
Baotou, China
Bao Xishun and his wife Xia Shujuan leave in Baotou
Bao Xishun (R), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, and his wife Xia Shujuan, 29, 1.68 metres (5 ft., 5 inches) tall, leave after a news conference in Baotou in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. The world's tallest man, whose search for a bride covered the world, ended up marrying a woman from his hometown nearly half his age and more than two feet shorter, Chinese media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA/
RTR1RSK2
July 13, 2007
He Pingping (R), 19, a 0.73 metre (2 feet, 5 inches) tall man, looks up as he shakes hands with Bao Xishun...
Baotou, China
He Pingping looks up as he shakes hands with Bao Xishun in Baotou
He Pingping (R), 19, a 0.73 metre (2 feet, 5 inches) tall man, looks up as he shakes hands with Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, in Baotou, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. He is applying for the Guinness World Record as the world's shortest man,local media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA/
RTR1RSJP
July 13, 2007
He Pingping (R), 19, a 0.73 metres (2 feet, 5 inches) man, adjusts his suit as he shakes hands with Bao...
Baotou, China
Bao Xishun shakes hands with He Pingping in Baotou
He Pingping (R), 19, a 0.73 metres (2 feet, 5 inches) man, adjusts his suit as he shakes hands with Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, in Baotou, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. He is applying for the Guinness World Record as the world's shortest man,local media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA/
RTR1RSJN
July 13, 2007
Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records...
Baotou, China
Bao Xishun shakes hands with He Pingping in Baotou
Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, shakes hands with He Pingping, 19, a 0.73-metre (2 feet, 5 inches) tall man, in Baotou, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. He is applying for the Guinness World Record as the world's shortest man, local media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA/
RTR1RSJM
July 13, 2007
Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records...
Baotou, China
Bao Xishun shakes hands with He Pingping in Baotou
Bao Xishun (L), 56, a 2.36-metre (7 feet, 9 inches) tall herdsman listed by the Guinness World Records as the tallest living man, shakes hands with He Pingping, 19, a 0.73-metre (2 feet, 5 inches) tall man, in Baotou, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region July 13, 2007. He is applying for the Guinness World Record as the world's shortest man, local media reported. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
CHINA MONGOLIA
RTRMU0M
March 14, 1999
A villager checks a flooded area in Nanhaizi March 13. Chinese air force planes dropped 20 bombs to blow...
Nanhaizi, China
A MONGOLIAN VILLAGER CHECKS THE WATER LEVEL IN INNER MONGOLIA.
A villager checks a flooded area in Nanhaizi March 13. Chinese air force planes dropped 20 bombs to blow up ice blocking a 22 kilometre section of the Yellow River in Nanhaizi near Baotou City, an industrial base of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The obstruction caused water levels to rise, disrupting traffic on a national highway and operations of a nearby power plant.

ASW/JIR
CHINA MONGOLIA
RTRMU0G
March 14, 1999
Villagers check a flooded area in Nanhaizi March 13. Chinese air force planes dropped 20 bombs to blow...
Nanhaizi, China
MONGOLIAN VILLAGERS CHECK THE WATER LEVEL IN INNER MONGOLIA.
Villagers check a flooded area in Nanhaizi March 13. Chinese air force planes dropped 20 bombs to blow up ice blocking a 22 kilometre section of the Yellow River in Nanhaizi near Baotou City, an industrial base of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The obstruction caused water levels to rise, disrupting traffic on a national highway and operations of a nearby power plant.

ASW/JIR/AA
CHINA MONGOLIA
RTRMU0A
March 14, 1999
Chinese air force planes blow up ice blocking a 22-km section of the Yellow River in north China's Inner...
Nanhaizi, China
CHINESE AIR FORCE PLANES BLOW UP ICE ON THE YELLOW RIVER IN CHINA.
Chinese air force planes blow up ice blocking a 22-km section of the Yellow River in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region March 13. A total of 20 bombs were dropped in Nanhaizi near Baotou City, an industrial base of the region. The obstruction caused water levels to rise, disrupting traffic on a national highway and operations of a nearby power plant.

ASW/JIR/AA
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