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Search results for: Biomedical-Science

HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K5K
February 11, 2016
A biologist displays frozen cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP),...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist displays frozen cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas in Campinas,...
A biologist displays frozen cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4I
February 11, 2016
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
A biologist works with Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4H
February 11, 2016
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with virus Zika in the laboratory of Biology from...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with virus Zika in the laboratory of Biology from...
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with virus Zika in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4E
February 11, 2016
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus in the laboratory of Biology from...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus in the laboratory of Biology from...
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4D
February 11, 2016
A biologist works in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil,...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas in Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4B
February 11, 2016
Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus are seen through a microscope in the laboratory of Biology...
Campinas, Brazil
Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus are seen through a microscope in the laboratory of Biology...
Aedes mosquito cells inoculated with Zika virus are seen through a microscope in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K4A
February 11, 2016
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP),...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas in...
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K48
February 11, 2016
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas...
A biologist works with cell of Aedes mosquito in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26K47
February 11, 2016
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP),...
Campinas, Brazil
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP),...
A biologist displays Aedes mosquito cells in the laboratory of Biology from University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, February 11, 2016. According to UNICAMP, its scientists are developing a test to detect and identify the presence of genetic material associated with the Zika virus, dengue and Chikungunya in samples saliva, blood or urine. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker
EL SALVADOR-VIOLENCE/WIDERIMAGE
RTX23ECN
January 21, 2016
A forensic technician makes notes while performing an autopsy on a crime victim at the morgue of the...
San Salvador, El Salvador
The Wider Image: Death in San Salvador
A forensic technician makes notes while performing an autopsy on a crime victim at the morgue of the Forensic Institute in San Salvador, July 7, 2015. In El Salvador the number of homicides surged 70 percent last year, making the central American nation among the most violent countries in the world. Violence and murders have risen steadily since a 2012 truce between the two main street gangs began to fall apart. Months of reporting show killings in the suburbs of the capital, San Salvador, where powerful gangs known as maras control entire neighbourhoods. REUTERS/Jose Cabezas PICTURE 34 OF 35 - SEARCH "CABEZAS MURDER" FOR ALL IMAGES
TECH-CES/
RTX211IY
January 05, 2016
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial Beautification System, that is designed to treat various skin-related disorders, at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
TECH-CES/
RTX211IJ
January 05, 2016
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial Beautification System, that is designed to treat various skin-related disorders, at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
ARGENTINA-DRUGS/
RTX1S5TW
September 24, 2015
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy on a unknown person at the morgue of Rosario, north of Buenos...
Rosario, Argentina
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy on a unknown person at the morgue of Rosario, north of Buenos...
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy on a unknown person at the morgue of Rosario, north of Buenos Aires, Argentina September 10, 2015. International drug-enforcement officials have taken to calling Rosario "The Tijuana of Argentina" for what it has in common with the Mexican border city used to move cocaine into the United States. Experts say the drug enters Argentina by truck or plane from Andean cocaine-producing countries to the north. The smuggling routes narrow the closer shipments get to Rosario, increasing violent competition among gangs to control the final steps toward the Parana River, which leads south to Buenos Aires and the shipping lanes of the Atlantic. Drug-related killings spiked so high in Rosario last year that federal forces were called in to provide security. To match story ARGENTINA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 10, 2015. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian
ARGENTINA-DRUGS/
RTX1S5OC
September 24, 2015
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy on a unknown person at the morgue of Rosario, north of Buenos...
Rosario, Argentina
An official from the AFIP tax agency walks her sniffer dog by the port of Rosario
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy on a unknown person at the morgue of Rosario, north of Buenos Aires, September 10, 2015. International drug-enforcement officials have taken to calling Rosario "The Tijuana of Argentina" for what it has in common with the Mexican border city used to move cocaine into the United States. Experts say the drug enters Argentina by truck or plane from Andean cocaine-producing countries to the north. The smuggling routes narrow the closer shipments get to Rosario, increasing violent competition among gangs to control the final steps toward the Parana River, which leads south to Buenos Aires and the shipping lanes of the Atlantic. Drug-related killings spiked so high in Rosario last year that federal forces were called in to provide security. To match story ARGENTINA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 10, 2015. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian
ARGENTINA-CRIME/
RTX1RSIG
September 22, 2015
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF DEATH AND INJURY Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy...
Rosario, Argentina
Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy at a morgue in Rosario, north of Buenos Aires
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF DEATH AND INJURY Forensic physicians carry out an autopsy at a morgue in Rosario, north of Buenos Aires, September 10, 2015. Members of Argentina’s Gendarmerie took control of security in parts of the city last year after a spike in violence in drug-infested neighbourhoods. The local morgue reports a fall in homicides since April 2014, when the government sent its Gendarmerie to Rosario to provide law and order in areas of the city. Picture taken September 10, 2015. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QT00
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden comments while touring a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden comments while touring biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in...
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden comments while touring a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QSZJ
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden comments while touring a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden tours biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden comments while touring a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QSZ1
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami...
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QSYP
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (R) tours a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden tours biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (R) tours a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QSY9
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden tours a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden tours biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden tours a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
USA-ELECTION/BIDEN
RTX1QSXQ
September 02, 2015
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College...
Miami, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami...
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden arrives to tour a biomedical lab in the Science Center at Miami Dade College North Campus in Miami, Florida September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
CHINA-HEALTH/RETURNEES
RTR4PDKZ
February 12, 2015
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph at his office in Shanghai, February...
Shanghai, China
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph at his office in Shanghai
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph at his office in Shanghai, February 11, 2015. In biotech parks across the Yangtze River Delta, dozens of start-ups are working to develop drugs to treat China's biggest emerging diseases - from diabetes and Hepatitis B to respiratory illnesses and cancer. It's early days, but firms like Hua Medicine and Innovent Biologics embody China's hopes for competitive biomedical innovation. And their Chinese-born, Western-educated founders represent the long-awaited return of the nation's brightest life scientists. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS HEALTH)
CHINA-HEALTH/RETURNEES
RTR4PDKY
February 12, 2015
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph in front of a company logo, at his...
Shanghai, China
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph in front of a company logo, at his...
Li Chen, co-founder and CEO of Hua Medicine, poses for a photograph in front of a company logo, at his office in Shanghai, February 11, 2015. In biotech parks across the Yangtze River Delta, dozens of start-ups are working to develop drugs to treat China's biggest emerging diseases - from diabetes and Hepatitis B to respiratory illnesses and cancer. It's early days, but firms like Hua Medicine and Innovent Biologics embody China's hopes for competitive biomedical innovation. And their Chinese-born, Western-educated founders represent the long-awaited return of the nation's brightest life scientists. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS HEALTH)
USA-RELIGION/GLUTEN
RTR4J6JJ
December 24, 2014
Altar Bread Manager Sister Lynn Marie D'Souza, who has a degree in biomedical sciences from Texas A&M,...
CLYDE, UNITED STATES
Sister D'Souza packages low-gluten wafers at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration monastery...
Altar Bread Manager Sister Lynn Marie D'Souza, who has a degree in biomedical sciences from Texas A&M, packages low-gluten wafers at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration monastery in Clyde, Missouri, December 18, 2014. The Sisters have made communion wafers since 1910 and began making a low-gluten version in 2003 and have gone from 143 customers in 2004 to more than 11,000 customers from around the world. Photo taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Dave Kaup (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
GERMANY-SCIENCE/
RTR45SGY
September 11, 2014
Test person Niklas Thiel poses with an electroencephalography (EEG) cap which measures brain activity,...
Garching, Germany
Test person Thiel poses with an electroencephalography cap which measures brain activity, at the Technische...
Test person Niklas Thiel poses with an electroencephalography (EEG) cap which measures brain activity, at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) in Garching near Munich September 9, 2014. The researchers from TUM and the Technische Universitaet Berlin (team Phypa) try to find ways to control an airplane with computer translated brain impulses without the pilot touching the plane's controls. The solution, if achieved, would contribute to greater flight safety and reduce pilots' workload. Picture taken September 9, 2014. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEADSHOT SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
GERMANY-SCIENCE/
RTR45SGJ
September 11, 2014
A combination of four pictures shows test person Niklas Thiel posing with an electroencephalography (EEG)...
Garching, Germany
A combination of four pictures shows test person Thiel posing with an electroencephalography cap at the...
A combination of four pictures shows test person Niklas Thiel posing with an electroencephalography (EEG) cap which measures brain activity, at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) in Garching near Munich September 9, 2014. The researchers from TUM and the Technische Universitaet Berlin (team Phypa) try to find ways to control an airplane with computer translated brain impulses without the pilot touching the plane's controls. The solution, if achieved, would contribute to greater flight safety and reduce pilots' workload. Picture taken September 9, 2014. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
SAFRICA-RHINOS-TECH
RTR452L2
September 05, 2014
Members of the media film as a ranger performs a post mortem on the carcass of a rhino after it was killed...
Pretoria, South Africa
Members of the media film as a ranger performs a post mortem on the carcass of a rhino after it was killed...
Members of the media film as a ranger performs a post mortem on the carcass of a rhino after it was killed for its horn by poachers at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province August 27, 2014. Rhino poachers in South Africa now risk giving themselves away when they shoot thanks to a high-tech, gunfire-detection system being piloted in the country's flagship Kruger National Park.The stakes are high, for rhinos are being slain in escalating numbers for their prized horns, alarming both conservationists and the government since wildlife in South Africa is an important tourist draw. Picture taken August 27, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS MEDIA)
USA-MISSOURI-SHOOTING/
RTR42UIW
August 18, 2014
Brown family attorney Daryl Parks points on an autopsy diagram to the head wound that was likely fatal...
FERGUSON, UNITED STATES
Brown family attorney Daryl Parks points on an autopsy diagram to the head wound that was likely fatal...
Brown family attorney Daryl Parks points on an autopsy diagram to the head wound that was likely fatal to Michael Brown during a news conference in Ferguson, Missouri August 18, 2014. The family of Michael Brown, a teenager shot dead by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, paid for an independent autopsy which was carried out by Dr. Michael Baden, former chief medical examiner for the City of New York. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0AN
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Voigt at...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J09P
March 28, 2014
Allan Kozlowski (L) , assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount...
New York, UNITED STATES
Kozlowski and Voigt adjust ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session to Samuels...
Allan Kozlowski (L) , assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, and Alexandra Voigt (R), a clinical research coordinator and therapist, adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session to 22-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him, at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York March 26, 2014. ReWalk, made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Kozlowski, whose patients are working with the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QG9
December 21, 2013
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L), Professor Christian Latremouille (C) of the department of...
Paris, France
Chairman of Carmat Cadudal, Professor Latremouille and French Health Minister Touraine at news conference...
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L), Professor Christian Latremouille (C) of the department of cardiovascular surgery and transplant of organs at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital and French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QG6
December 21, 2013
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L) and Professor Christian Latremouille of the department of...
Paris, France
Chairman of Carmat Cadudal and Professor Latremouille attend a news conference at Georges Pompidou European...
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L) and Professor Christian Latremouille of the department of cardiovascular surgery and transplant of organs at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QG4
December 21, 2013
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L) and Professor Christian Latremouille of the department of...
Paris, France
Chairman of Carmat Cadudal and Professor Latremouille attend a news conference at Georges Pompidou European...
Chairman of Carmat Jean-Claude Cadudal (L) and Professor Christian Latremouille of the department of cardiovascular surgery and transplant of organs at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFZ
December 21, 2013
Professor Christian Latremouille (L), member of the department of cardiovascular surgery and transplantation...
Paris, France
Professor Latremouille, French Health Minister Touraine, surgeon Carpentier attend news conference in...
Professor Christian Latremouille (L), member of the department of cardiovascular surgery and transplantation of organs at Georges Pompidou European Hospital, French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (C) and Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFV
December 21, 2013
French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) and Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat...
Paris, France
French Health Minister Touraine and surgeon Carpentier attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou...
French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) and Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFT
December 21, 2013
Marisol Touraine (L). French Social Affairs and Health Minister, Alain Carpentier (C), surgeon and Carmat...
Paris, France
French Health Minister Touraine, surgeon Carpentier, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals Hirsch...
Marisol Touraine (L). French Social Affairs and Health Minister, Alain Carpentier (C), surgeon and Carmat co-founder and Martin Hirsch, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals AP-HP, attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFP
December 21, 2013
French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) and Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat...
Paris, France
French Health Minister Touraine and surgeon Carpentier attend a news conference in Paris
French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) and Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFN
December 21, 2013
Marisol Touraine (L). French Social Affairs and Health Minister, Alain Carpentier (C), surgeon and Carmat...
Paris, France
French Health Minister Touraine, surgeon Carpentier, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals Hirsch...
Marisol Touraine (L). French Social Affairs and Health Minister, Alain Carpentier (C), surgeon and Carmat co-founder and Martin Hirsch, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals AP-HP, attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFH
December 21, 2013
Alain Carpentier (L), surgeon and Carmat co-founder and Martin Hirsch, director of Paris' public assitance...
Paris, France
Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder and Hirsch, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals AP-HP,...
Alain Carpentier (L), surgeon and Carmat co-founder and Martin Hirsch, director of Paris' public assitance hospitals AP-HP, attend a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFE
December 21, 2013
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European...
Paris, France
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European...
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CARMAT-IMPLANT/
RTX16QFD
December 21, 2013
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European...
Paris, France
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference in Paris
Alain Carpentier, surgeon and Carmat co-founder, attends a news conference at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, December 21, 2013. France's Carmat said on Friday it had carried out its first implant of an artificial heart that can beat for up to five years, adding that the operation had gone smoothly. The implant operation was performed on Wednesday, the biomedical firm said in a statement. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
CANCER-KNIFE/
RTX11PQG
July 17, 2013
Surgeon and lecturer in surgical metabonomics, James Kinross, demonstrates the Intelligent Knife at St...
London, United Kingdom
James Kinross demonstrates the Intelligent Knife at St Mary's Hospital in London
Surgeon and lecturer in surgical metabonomics, James Kinross, demonstrates the Intelligent Knife at St Mary's Hospital in London July 17, 2013. Scientists have developed an "intelligent knife" that can tell surgeons immediately whether the tissue they are cutting is cancerous or not. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
BRITAIN-BADGERS/
RTX1085A
June 01, 2013
A demonstrator hangs from a lamp post during a protest against the cull of badgers, in central London...
London, United Kingdom
A demonstrator hangs from a lamp post during a protest against the cull of badgers, in central London...
A demonstrator hangs from a lamp post during a protest against the cull of badgers, in central London June 1, 2013. Farmers in two English counties will be allowed to kill badgers in an attempt to control tuberculosis in cows, in a pilot program beginning today. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS)
Health
Health
"Everlasting" Hope for Heart Failure Patients - 16 May 2013
10 PICTURES
BRITAIN/
RTXY83R
April 04, 2013
Biomedical PhD student Meghan Betts (L) and neurotechnology PhD student Andreas Thomik pose as they demonstrate...
London, United Kingdom
PhD students pose as they demonstrate a motion capture suit at the Strictly Science exhibition at Imperial...
Biomedical PhD student Meghan Betts (L) and neurotechnology PhD student Andreas Thomik pose as they demonstrate a motion capture suit at the Strictly Science exhibition at Imperial College in London April 4, 2013. Students at the university are using the motion capture suit to gather data about how movement is affected by age and disease. The Strictly Science exhibition celebrates 100 years of the Medical Research Council. REUTERS/Olivia Harris (BRITAIN - Tags: EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
LIVER-DEVICE/TRANSPLANT
RTR3F1J3
March 15, 2013
Director of transplant surgery at King's College Hospital, Nigel Heaton (L), speaks as Oxford University...
London, United Kingdom
Director of transplant surgery at King's College Hospital, Nigel Heaton, speaks during a news conference...
Director of transplant surgery at King's College Hospital, Nigel Heaton (L), speaks as Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering Constantin Coussios and Oxford University professor of transplantation Peter Friend (R) listen, during a news conference at the Royal Society in London March 15, 2013. A donated human liver has been kept alive, warm and functioning outside a human being on a newly-developed machine and then successfully transplanted into patients in a medical world first. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
LIVER-DEVICE/TRANSPLANT
RTR3F1IP
March 15, 2013
Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering, Constantin Coussios (L), speaks as Oxford University...
London, United Kingdom
Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering, Coussios, speaks as Oxford University professor...
Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering, Constantin Coussios (L), speaks as Oxford University professor of transplantation, Peter Friend, listens during a news conference at the Royal Society in London March 15, 2013. A donated human liver has been kept alive, warm and functioning outside a human being on a newly-developed machine and then successfully transplanted into patients in a medical world first. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
LIVER-DEVICE/TRANSPLANT
RTR3F1II
March 15, 2013
Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering, Constantin Coussios (L), listens to Oxford University...
London, United Kingdom
University professor of biomedical engineering, Coussios, listens to Oxford University professor of transplantation,...
Oxford University professor of biomedical engineering, Constantin Coussios (L), listens to Oxford University professor of transplantation, Peter Friend, speak during a news conference at the Royal Society in London March 15, 2013. A donated human liver has been kept alive, warm and functioning outside a human being on a newly-developed machine and then successfully transplanted into patients in a medical world first. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EF21
February 28, 2013
A biomedical building is pictured at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California,...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
A biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego
A biomedical building is pictured at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013. Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in San Diego. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EF1T
February 28, 2013
Students enter the biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego,...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
Students enter the biomedical building at University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego
Students enter the biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013. Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in San Diego. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EEZ0
February 28, 2013
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California...
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013.Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in San Diego. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EEYV
February 28, 2013
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California...
The Leichtag Family Foundation Biomedical Research Building is shown at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013. Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in San Diego. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EEYP
February 28, 2013
A student studies in the biomedical library at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego,...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
A student studies in the biomedical library at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego,...
A student studies in the biomedical library at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013. Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in California. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
USA-FISCAL/
RTR3EEYO
February 28, 2013
Students and facility staff enter the biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD)...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
Students and facility staff enter the biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD)...
Students and facility staff enter the biomedical building at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in San Diego, California, February 28, 2013. Looming sequestration cuts are expected to adversely effect scientific research in San Diego. REUTER/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
NEUROSCIENCE-CRIME/
RTR377ZQ
August 29, 2012
A laboratory assistant holds one hemisphere of a healthy brain in the Morphological unit of psychopathology...
CHENE-BOURG, Switzerland
Lab assistant holds hemisphere of healthy brain at Belle Idee University Hospital in Chene-Bourg
A laboratory assistant holds one hemisphere of a healthy brain in the Morphological unit of psychopathology in the Neuropsychiatry division of the Belle Idee University Hospital in Chene-Bourg near Geneva in a March 14, 2011 file photo. A series of recent studies has established that psychopathic rapists and murderers have distinct brain structures that show up when their heads are scanned using MRI. Photograph taken March 14, 2011. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/files (SWITZERLAND - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NESTLE/HEALTH
RTR336PK
June 06, 2012
Doctor David Bailey cycles on an exercise bike during a performance assessment in the Nestle metabolic...
Lausanne, Switzerland
Doctor David Bailey cycles on an exercise bike during a performance assessment in the Nestle metabolic...
Doctor David Bailey cycles on an exercise bike during a performance assessment in the Nestle metabolic unit in Lausanne June 6, 2012. Nestle, the world biggest food group opened the new clinical development unit on Wednesday to conduct trials into nutrition for both sick and healthy people as the food industry comes under pressure to back up health claims for its products with scientific research. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: HEALTH FOOD BUSINESS)
US-DENGUE-VACCINE
RTR336CA
June 06, 2012
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc carries containers of dengue virus titration assay at a cell culture laboratory...
Hanoi, Vietnam
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc carries containers of dengue virus titration assay at a cell culture laboratory...
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc carries containers of dengue virus titration assay at a cell culture laboratory of Vietnam's Vabiotech on dengue fever research in Hanoi June 6, 2012. One of the grimmest legacies of the war in the Pacific is still being fought 70 years on, but a victory over dengue, the intensely painful "breakbone fever" which that conflict helped spread around the world, may be in sight. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
US-DENGUE-VACCINE
RTR336BK
June 06, 2012
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc works at a laboratory of Vietnam's Vabiotech on dengue fever research in Hanoi...
Hanoi, Vietnam
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc works at a laboratory of Vietnam's Vabiotech on dengue fever research in Hanoi...
Researcher Hoang Duc Loc works at a laboratory of Vietnam's Vabiotech on dengue fever research in Hanoi June 6, 2012. One of the grimmest legacies of the war in the Pacific is still being fought 70 years on, but a victory over dengue, the intensely painful "breakbone fever" which that conflict helped spread around the world, may be in sight. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GF
March 30, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front of newly developed 3D nano-printer...
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front of a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303HB
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of newly developed 3D nano-printer...
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
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