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Search results for: Bionic-Technology

Spotlight
Spotlight
Mercedes-Benz unveils Avatar-themed car
11 PICTURES
USA-ELECTION/BUSH
RTS4I01
October 14, 2015
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush listens as Matt Albuquerque, owner of Next Step Bionics...
Manchester, UNITED STATES
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush listens as Matt Albuquerque, owner of Next Step Bionics...
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush listens as Matt Albuquerque, owner of Next Step Bionics & Prosthetics, explains how the technology in the prosthetic leg of Sean Kiernan works at the business in Manchester, New Hampshire October 14, 2015. REUTERS/Mary Schwalm
USA-FASHION/
RTSXOF
September 14, 2015
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda...
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda presentation of the Spring/Summer 2016 collection during New York Fashion Week in Vanderbilt Hall at Grand Central Station, New York, September 13, 2015. FTL Moda presented a range of designers and partnered with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation and Global Disability Inclusion. The show casted a diverse range of models, including models living with disabilities. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
USA-FASHION/
RTSXO5
September 14, 2015
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda...
Rebekah Marine, a model with a bionic arm, presents a creation from Archana Korchhar during the FTL Moda presentation of the Spring/Summer 2016 collection during New York Fashion Week in Vanderbilt Hall at Grand Central Station, New York, September 13, 2015. FTL Moda presented a range of designers and partnered with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation and Global Disability Inclusion. The show casted a diverse range of models, including models living with disabilities. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4ZU
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able...
A Honda Motor Co's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, is displayed at its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4ZT
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4Z8
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4Z7
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4Z6
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4Z4
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTX1L4Z3
July 21, 2015
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with...
Tokyo, Japan
Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened...
A Honda Motor Co employee demonstrates the company's new Walking Assist Device, which for those with weakened leg muscles who are still able to walk, during its unveiling in Tokyo July 21, 2015. Honda announced the company will lease the Walking Assist Device to hospitals in Japan that provide rehabilitation training / physical therapy in the area of walking on November, 2015. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
USA-HEALTH/
RTR4YP5E
June 03, 2015
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago,...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago...
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States, June 3, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young
USA-JAPAN/
RTX1AIN6
April 27, 2015
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates an early version of a bionic...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Herr demonstrates an early version of a bionic limb developed...
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates an early version of a bionic limb developed by his biomechatronics lab for Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 27, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-JAPAN/
RTX1AIMX
April 27, 2015
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr waits to demonstrate the bionic limbs developed...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Herr waits to demonstrate the bionic limbs developed...
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr waits to demonstrate the bionic limbs developed by his biomechatronics lab for Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 27, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-JAPAN/
RTX1AIMW
April 27, 2015
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Herr demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing that...
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing that were developed by his biomechatronics lab for Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 27, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-JAPAN/
RTX1AIMQ
April 27, 2015
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing...
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates the bionic limbs he is wearing that were developed by his biomechatronics lab for Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (2nd R) at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 27, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
GERMANY-TRADE/FAIR
RTR4X38W
April 13, 2015
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi holds BionicANTs developed by...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Modi holds BionicANTs developed by German FESTO company,...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi holds BionicANTs developed by German FESTO company, at the world's largest industrial technology fair, the Hannover Messe, in Hanover April 13, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
GERMANY-TRADE/FAIR
RTR4X37D
April 13, 2015
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi holds BionicANTs developed by...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Modi holds BionicANTs developed by German FESTO company,...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi holds BionicANTs developed by German FESTO company, at the world's largest industrial technology fair, the Hannover Messe, in Hanover April 13, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
GERMANY-TRADE FAIR/
RTR4X007
April 12, 2015
A woman holds a BionicANT (according to manufacturer, 'ANT' stands both for the natural role model and...
Hanover, Germany
A woman holds a BionicANT developed by German FESTO company, at the world's largest industrial technology...
A woman holds a BionicANT (according to manufacturer, 'ANT' stands both for the natural role model and for Autonomous Networking Technologies) developed by German FESTO company, at the world's largest industrial technology fair, the Hannover Messe in Hanover, April 12, 2015. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J45X
December 23, 2014
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, moves her prosthetic arm at the...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm in an accident, moves her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology...
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, moves her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J45L
December 23, 2014
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, reaches for a cup with her right...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm in an accident, reaches for a cup with her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx...
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, reaches for a cup with her right arm and left prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J44U
December 23, 2014
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, puts on a prosthetic arm at the...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm in an accident, puts on her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology...
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, puts on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J44D
December 23, 2014
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, writes her name using her prosthetic...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm in an accident, writes her name using her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx...
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, writes her name using her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J449
December 23, 2014
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company...
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J448
December 23, 2014
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company...
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario works on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J43U
December 23, 2014
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario shows the sensor of a prosthetic arm, at the Bioparx Health Technology...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario shows the sensor of a prosthetic arm, at the Bioparx Health Technology...
Electronic engineer Sebastian Vicario shows the sensor of a prosthetic arm, at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J43G
December 23, 2014
Parts of a prosthetic arm and its sensors are seen at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Parts of a prosthetic arm and its sensors are seen at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa...
Parts of a prosthetic arm and its sensors are seen at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J42K
December 23, 2014
Bioengineer Luciana Juliat (R) measures the right stump of Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm seven years...
Santa Fe, Argentina
Bioengineer Juliat measures the right stump of Azambullo before placing a prosthetic on her, in Santa...
Bioengineer Luciana Juliat (R) measures the right stump of Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm seven years ago in an accident, before placing a prosthetic on her, at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LO03
April 17, 2014
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands in his...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands in his lab...
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands in his lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS)
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LNZZ
April 17, 2014
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins displaying various bionic limbs his lab has developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY)
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LNZY
April 17, 2014
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins displaying various bionic limbs his lab has developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY)
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LNZX
April 17, 2014
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins displaying various bionic limbs his lab has developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LNZM
April 17, 2014
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins...
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins displaying various bionic limbs his lab has developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS)
GERMANY/
RTR3KABQ
April 07, 2014
A man takes a photograph of the 'BionicKangaroo', an artificial Kangaroo at the stand of 'Festo' at the...
Hanover, Germany
Man takes photograph of 'BionicKangaroo' at stand of 'Festo' at "Hannover Messe" industrial trade fair...
A man takes a photograph of the 'BionicKangaroo', an artificial Kangaroo at the stand of 'Festo' at the "Hannover Messe" industrial trade fair in Hanover April 7, 2014. The world's leading fair for industrial technology, with about 5,000 exhibitors from 65 nations, runs till April 11 with the Netherlands as this year's partner country. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS)
Technology
Technology
Learning to ReWalk - 31 Mar 2014
17 PICTURES
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0H1
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels pauses to pose for portrait while walking with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, pauses to pose for a portrait while walking with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0GQ
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels walks with ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Voigt at the...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATESSCIENCE BUSINESS - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0GA
March 28, 2014
A ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, a computer...
New York, UNITED STATES
ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies is pictured...
A ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches, is pictured on a table in a rehabilitation room before being used at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0FD
March 28, 2014
A wireless wristband controller sits next to its counterpart, a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit...
New York, UNITED STATES
Wireless wristband controller sits next to its counterpart, a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit...
A wireless wristband controller sits next to its counterpart, a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0F0
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels pauses in sun-filled atrium while walking with the ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, pauses in the sun-filled atrium while walking with the ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0CI
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels practices walking up steps with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, practices walking up steps with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0C1
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels pauses while walking with ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit to talk to Cesario during...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, pauses while walking with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit to talk to Jim Cesario (R), Spinal Chord Injury Outreach Coordinator, during a therapy session with the ReWalk at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0B8
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels walks with ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Voigt at the...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) says machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0AN
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Voigt at...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, walks with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session with Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0AM
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels engages ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit with a wireless wrist band controller on his...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, engages a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit with a wireless wrist band controller on his wrist during a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0A3
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels engages ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit by pressing a command on a wireless wrist band...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, engages a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit by pressing a command on a wireless wrist band controller during a therapy session with Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator, at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J09P
March 28, 2014
Allan Kozlowski (L) , assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount...
New York, UNITED STATES
Kozlowski and Voigt adjust ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session to Samuels...
Allan Kozlowski (L) , assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, and Alexandra Voigt (R), a clinical research coordinator and therapist, adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session to 22-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him, at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York March 26, 2014. ReWalk, made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Kozlowski, whose patients are working with the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J08W
March 28, 2014
Allan Kozlowski (L), assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount...
New York, UNITED STATES
Kozlowski and Voigt adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before therapy session with Samuels...
Allan Kozlowski (L), assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, and Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session with 22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him, at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York March 26, 2014. ReWalk, made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Kozlowski, whose patients are working with the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J078
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels lifts himself from his wheelchair into a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit for a therapy...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, lifts himself from his wheelchair into a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit for a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J06S
March 28, 2014
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed...
New York, UNITED STATES
Samuels from Queens sits in his wheelchair as therapist Voigt prepares ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal...
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, sits in his wheelchair as therapist Alexandra Voigt (R) prepares a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit for a therapy session with Samuels at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J04B
March 28, 2014
A ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, a computer...
New York, UNITED STATES
ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit hangs in a rehabilitation room before being used at the Mount...
A ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches, hangs in a rehabilitation room before being used at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where patients are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics), hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDXH
March 10, 2014
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDVQ
March 10, 2014
British Prime Minister David Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Angela Merkel examines a bionic hand...
Hanover, Germany
British PM Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Merkel examines a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT...
British Prime Minister David Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Angela Merkel examines a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDVN
March 10, 2014
British Prime Minister David Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Angela Merkel shakes hands with a...
Hanover, Germany
British PM Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Merkel shakes hands with a woman wearing a bionic hand...
British Prime Minister David Cameron looks on as German Chancellor Angela Merkel shakes hands with a woman wearing a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDVF
March 10, 2014
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks on as British Prime Minister David Cameron shakes hands with a...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel reacts as British PM Cameron shakes hands with a woman wearing a bionic hand...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks on as British Prime Minister David Cameron shakes hands with a woman wearing a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDV6
March 10, 2014
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS)
GERMANY/
RTR3GDV1
March 10, 2014
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron look at a bionic hand during...
Hanover, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel reacts as British PM Cameron look at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron look at a bionic hand during a tour at the CeBIT technology fair in Hanover March 10, 2014. Britain is the partner country this year for the fair. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TELECOMS)
USA/
RTX14F29
October 17, 2013
An engineer makes an adjustment to the robot "The Incredible Bionic Man" at the Smithsonian National...
Washington, UNITED STATES
An engineer makes an adjustment to "The Incredible Bionic Man" at the Smithsonian National Air and Space...
An engineer makes an adjustment to the robot "The Incredible Bionic Man" at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington October 17, 2013. The robot is the world's first-ever functioning bionic man made of prosthetic parts and artificial organ implants. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE SEE GF2EA4P0CW301
USA/
RTX14F24
October 17, 2013
Dr. Bertholt Meyer (R) and James Pope assist the robot "The Incredible Bionic Man" while it walks at...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Dr. Meyer and Pope assist "The Incredible Bionic Man" at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum...
Dr. Bertholt Meyer (R) and James Pope assist the robot "The Incredible Bionic Man" while it walks at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington October 17, 2013. The robot is the world's first-ever functioning bionic man made of prosthetic parts and artificial organ implants. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
Technology
Technology
’Rex' the Bionic Man - 06 Feb 2012
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