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Search results for: Blueberry

BELARUS/
RTR3Z9T9 
July 18, 2014 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near... 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9SW 
July 18, 2014 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near... 
Vasily Marinich, 67, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers mushrooms in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9SO 
July 18, 2014 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD AGRICULTURE) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9S2 
July 18, 2014 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, is seen as she gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, is seen as she gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part... 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, is seen as she gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD AGRICULTURE) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9S0 
July 18, 2014 
Mushrooms in a box are seen in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus,... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Mushrooms in a box are seen in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus,... 
Mushrooms in a box are seen in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD AGRICULTURE) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9RJ 
July 18, 2014 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD AGRICULTURE) 
BELARUS/
RTR3Z9QM 
July 18, 2014 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Minsk, Belarus 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest... 
Kravchenya Tatyana, 63, a Ukrainian citizen, gathers blueberries in a Belarussian part of the forest near the border between Ukraine and Belarus, near the village of Dzerzhinsk, south of Minsk, July 18, 2014. Ukrainian villagers cross the border every day to gather blueberries and mushrooms in Belarus to earn some money. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3YEA0 
July 13, 2014 
Robert Harvey, a beekeeper, or apiarist, secures a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as he prepares... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Robert Harvey, a beekeeper, or apiarist, secures a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as he prepares... 
Robert Harvey, a beekeeper, or apiarist, secures a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as he prepares to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE BUSINESS) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3YE9Z 
July 13, 2014 
David Hackenberg, 65, a beekeeper or apiarist, puts on a bee suite after taking a break between collecting... 
JONESBORO, UNITED STATES 
David Hackenberg, 65, a beekeeper or apiarist, puts on a bee suite after taking a break between collecting... 
David Hackenberg, 65, a beekeeper or apiarist, puts on a bee suite after taking a break between collecting bee hives after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Jonesboro, Maine June 24, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 24, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3YE9T 
July 13, 2014 
A man is lowered with the help of a loader after securing a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
A man is lowered with the help of a loader after securing a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as... 
A man is lowered with the help of a loader after securing a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as beekeepers prepare to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE BUSINESS) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3YE9D 
July 13, 2014 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to another... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked upon a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to... 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE BUSINESS) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3YE9B 
July 13, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey looks at blueberry blossoms which his Italian honey bee colonies were pollinating... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey looks at blueberry blossoms which his Italian honey bee colonies were pollinating... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey looks at blueberry blossoms which his Italian honey bee colonies were pollinating near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the U.S. as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS AGRICULTURE) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3YE96 
July 13, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey releases a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey releases a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey releases a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the U.S. as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS AGRICULTURE) 
USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZYW 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeepers, or apiarists, secure a cover over bee hives stacked upon a truck as they prepare to transfer... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers, or apiarists, secure a cover over bee hives stacked upon a truck as they prepare to transfer... 
Beekeepers, or apiarists, secure a cover over bee hives stacked upon a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 15 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYU 
July 10, 2014 
David Hackenberg, 65, a beekeeper or apiarist, secures bee hives stacked upon the back of a truck as... 
JONESBORO, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper David Hackenberg secures bee hives stacked upon the back of a truck as he prepares to transfer... 
David Hackenberg, 65, a beekeeper or apiarist, secures bee hives stacked upon the back of a truck as he prepares to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Jonesboro, Maine June 24, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 24, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 16 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZYS 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeeper, or apiarist, David Hackenberg, 65, rests by the side of his truck at the end of the evening... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper David Hackenberg rests by the side of his truck after transferring bee hives from a blueberry... 
Beekeeper, or apiarist, David Hackenberg, 65, rests by the side of his truck at the end of the evening after transferring bee hives from a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 22, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 22, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 17 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYP 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to another... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked upon a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to... 
Beekeepers secure a cover over bee hives stacked on a truck as they prepare to transfer the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 13 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYN 
July 10, 2014 
A colony of Italian worker bees congregate outside their hive while pollinating a blueberry field near... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Colony of Italian worker bees congregate outside their hive while pollinating a blueberry field near... 
A colony of Italian worker bees congregate outside their hive while pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 22, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 22, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 11 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYL 
July 10, 2014 
A beekeeper uses a lift to stack beehives onto a truck before transferring the bees to another crop after... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper uses a lift to stack beehives onto a truck before transferring the bees to another crop after... 
A beekeeper uses a lift to stack beehives onto a truck before transferring the bees to another crop after they pollinated a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 12 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYI 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm bee colonies before transferring them to another crop after pollinating... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm bee colonies before transferring them to another crop after pollinating... 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm bee colonies before transferring them to another crop after pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 10 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYG 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeepers are seen atop a truck as they secure a cover over bee hives before transferring the bees to... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers are seen atop a truck as they secure a cover over bee hives before transferring the bees to... 
Beekeepers are seen atop a truck as they secure a cover over bee hives before transferring the bees to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 14 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYD 
July 10, 2014 
Italian honey bees hover around the suit of beekeeper Robert Harvey as he transfers bee colonies from... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Italian honey bees hover around the suit of beekeeper Robert Harvey as he transfers bee colonies from... 
Italian honey bees hover around the suit of beekeeper Robert Harvey as he transfers bee colonies from a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 08 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZYC 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm colonies before transferring them to another crop after pollinating... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm colonies before transferring them to another crop near Columbia Falls,... 
Beekeepers use a bee smoker to calm colonies before transferring them to another crop after pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 09 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZY7 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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USA-AGRICULTURE/HONEYBEES
RTR3XZY3 
July 10, 2014 
A beekeeper, or apiarist, moves beehives onto a truck to be transferred to another crop after they completed... 
JONESBORO, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper, or apiarist, moves beehives onto a truck to be transferred to another crop after they completed... 
A beekeeper, or apiarist, moves beehives onto a truck to be transferred to another crop after they completed pollinating a blueberry field near Jonesboro, Maine, June 24, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the U.S. as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 24, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 01 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZY1 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies from a blueberry field to pollinate crops... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies from a blueberry field to pollinate crops... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies from a blueberry field to pollinate crops in different fields near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the U.S. as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY AGRICULTURE)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 04 OF 17 FOR PACKAGE 'POLLINATION FOR THE NATION'
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USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZXZ 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies that were pollinating a blueberry field... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies that were pollinating a blueberry field... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey transfers Italian honey bee colonies that were pollinating a blueberry field to another crop near Columbia Falls, Maine June 22, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the United States as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 22, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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USA-AGRICULTURE/BEES
RTR3XZXT 
July 10, 2014 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey crosses over a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating... 
Columbia Falls, UNITED STATES 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey crosses over a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating... 
Beekeeper Robert Harvey crosses over a barricade as he works to transfer Italian honey bee colonies pollinating a blueberry field near Columbia Falls, Maine June 23, 2014. Over recent years, bees have been dying at a rate the U.S. government says is economically unsustainable. Honey bees pollinate plants that produce about a quarter of the food consumed by Americans, including apples, watermelons and beans. A lawsuit has now been filed by environmental groups in the United States seeking an injunction restricting the approval of a controversial class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or 'neonics'. These pesticides have become a subject of scrutiny in Europe and the U.S. as concern has mounted that they harm honeybees and other pollinators. Picture taken June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY AGRICULTURE)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3OXNO 
May 13, 2014 
London Mayor Boris Johnson offers a passenger some blueberries as he sits with Britain's Prime Minister... 
London, United Kingdom 
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson sit on an underground train as... 
London Mayor Boris Johnson offers a passenger some blueberries as he sits with Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (R) on an underground train, as they head to Westminster after local election campaigning in Harrow, London May 12, 2014. REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/pool (BRITAIN - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0X 
August 10, 2013 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois, Maine... 
DEBLOIS, UNITED STATES 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Maine's hillside wild blueberry fields, known as "barrens" locally, are often strewn with boulders and steep pitches and require specialized machinery for harvest. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0W 
August 10, 2013 
Crates of wild blueberries stand ready for processing on a farm in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. The... 
DEBLOIS, UNITED STATES 
Crates of wild blueberries stand ready for processing on a farm in Deblois 
Crates of wild blueberries stand ready for processing on a farm in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. The majority of Maine's wild blueberry harvest is frozen and used as ingredients for foods such as fruit shakes and pancakes. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0V 
August 10, 2013 
Maine low-bush blueberries are shown in a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. The berries are native... 
DELBOIS, UNITED STATES 
Maine low-bush blueberries are shown in a field in Deblois 
Maine low-bush blueberries are shown in a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. The berries are native to New England and Eastern Canada and are a different species than the cultivated, high-bush blueberries grown further south and west in the United States. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0U 
August 10, 2013 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois, Maine... 
DEBLOIS, UNITED STATES 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois 
A migrant worker uses a tractor-mounted machine harvester to collect wild blueberries in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Over the past two decades, Maine wild blueberry growers have mechanized approximately 80 percent of the state's harvest, using tractor-mounted machine harvesters in lieu of seasonal workers. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0T 
August 10, 2013 
Oscar Argueta, a migrant worker from San Juan de Intibucá, Honduras, rakes wild blueberries from a field... 
DEBLOIS, UNITED STATES 
Argueta, a migrant worker from San Juan de Intibucá, Honduras, rakes wild blueberries from a field in... 
Oscar Argueta, a migrant worker from San Juan de Intibucá, Honduras, rakes wild blueberries from a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Argueta says he can earn as much as $1,000 per week here. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0S 
August 10, 2013 
A crate of wild blueberries sits in a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Workers are typically... 
DELBOIS, UNITED STATES 
A crate of wild blueberries sits in a field in Deblois 
A crate of wild blueberries sits in a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Workers are typically paide between $2 and $3 per crate of Maine's REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA-MAINE/MIGRANTS
RTX12G0R 
August 10, 2013 
Migrant workers from Mexico and Honduras rake wild blueberries from a field in Deblois, Maine August... 
DELBOIS, UNITED STATES 
Migrant workers from Mexico and Honduras rake wild blueberries from a field in Deblois 
Migrant workers from Mexico and Honduras rake wild blueberries from a field in Deblois, Maine August 6, 2013. Maine has nearly 60,000 acres of wild, low-bush blueberries fields. Photo taken August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Dave Sherwood (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
USA/
RTX11PII 
July 17, 2013 
American business magnate Martha Stewart pours powdered sugar onto blueberries while discussing recipes... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
American business magnate Stewart pours powdered sugar onto blueberries while discussing recipes on NBC's... 
American business magnate Martha Stewart pours powdered sugar onto blueberries while discussing recipes on NBC's 'Today' show in Midtown, New York July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS FOOD) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M8C 
October 26, 2012 
Awards and cook books are pictured in a rack in the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Awards and cook books are pictured in a rack in the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen 
Awards and cook books are pictured in a rack in the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M88 
October 26, 2012 
Cooks are seen in a test kitchen of the Noma restaurant behind a rack of spices in Copenhagen October... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Cooks are seen in a test kitchen of the Noma restaurant behind a rack of spices in Copenhagen 
Cooks are seen in a test kitchen of the Noma restaurant behind a rack of spices in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M84 
October 26, 2012 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a test kitchen of the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a test kitchen of the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a test kitchen of the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M81 
October 26, 2012 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012.... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M80 
October 26, 2012 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012.... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen 
Cooks prepare some dishes in a preparation kitchen of the Noma restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M7W 
October 26, 2012 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, poses for a photo in a test kitchen in his restaurant... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, poses for a photo in a test kitchen in his restaurant... 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, poses for a photo in a test kitchen in his restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M7Q 
October 26, 2012 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his... 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M7P 
October 26, 2012 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his... 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M7K 
October 26, 2012 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his... 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
FOOD-DENMARK/NOMA
RTR39M7H 
October 26, 2012 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in... 
Copenhagen, Denmark 
Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his... 
Rene Redzepi, chef and co-owner of the restaurant Noma, talks with his employees in a test kitchen in his restaurant in Copenhagen October 25, 2012. While ant paste, milk curd and berry preserves make up the "Blueberries and ant" dish at Denmark's restaurant Noma, bacteria and yeast will soon be next for diners at the eatery which has been crowned world's best restaurant for three years. Located on the ground floor of a renovated listed 18th Century warehouse in the old Christianshavn canal district of Copenhagen, Noma is run by 34-year-old chef Rene Redzepi. Picture taken October 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (DENMARK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O2M 
July 06, 2012 
A bucket filled with blueberries is pictured in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles)... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A bucket filled with blueberries is pictured in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A bucket filled with blueberries is pictured in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O2C 
July 06, 2012 
Gathered blueberries are seen in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest... 
BORKI, Belarus 
Gathered blueberries are seen in a marsh near the village of Borki 
Gathered blueberries are seen in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O2A 
July 06, 2012 
A man counts money as he buys blueberries near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A man counts money as he buys blueberries near the village of Borki 
A man counts money as he buys blueberries near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O29 
July 06, 2012 
Belarussian women carry their harvest of blueberries through a marsh near the village of Borki, some... 
BORKI, Belarus 
Belarussian women carry their harvest of blueberries through a marsh near the village of Borki 
Belarussian women carry their harvest of blueberries through a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O20 
July 06, 2012 
A woman and a girl transport blueberries they gathered through a marsh near the village of Borki, some... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A woman and a girl transport blueberries they gathered through a marsh near the village of Borki 
A woman and a girl transport blueberries they gathered through a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O1X 
July 06, 2012 
People wait for a bus with blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some... 
BORKI, Belarus 
People wait for a bus with blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki 
People wait for a bus with blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O1V 
July 06, 2012 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O1I 
July 06, 2012 
A Belarussian man sells blueberries which he gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A Belarussian man sells blueberries which he gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A Belarussian man sells blueberries which he gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O1G 
July 06, 2012 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A Belarussian woman sells blueberries which they gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O1A 
July 06, 2012 
A woman holds blueberries she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles)... 
BORKI, Belarus 
Woman holds blueberries she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A woman holds blueberries she gathered in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O13 
July 06, 2012 
Belarussian women have their lunch during a break from gathering blueberries in a marsh near the village... 
BORKI, Belarus 
Belarussian women have their lunch during a break from gathering blueberries in a marsh near the village... 
Belarussian women have their lunch during a break from gathering blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O0X 
July 06, 2012 
A Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles)... 
BORKI, Belarus 
Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
BELARUS/
RTR34O0Q 
July 06, 2012 
A Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles)... 
BORKI, Belarus 
A Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki 
A Belarussian woman gathers blueberries in a marsh near the village of Borki, some 220 km (137 miles) southwest of Minsk, July 6, 2012. Villagers gather 10 -15 kg (22 - 33 lb) of blueberries in a day and sell them for 18,000 Belarussian roubles ($2.30) for a kilo. Photo taken with a fisheye lens. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (BELARUS - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS) 
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