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Search results for: CHALFIE-Martin

NOBEL/
RTR22GMN 
December 10, 2008 
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's... 
Guests and honorees join the Swedish royal family at the Nobel banquet in the Blue Hall at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. From right to left are: Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf, Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, Martin Chalfie, Crown Princess Victoria, Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clezio and Princess Christina. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GKP 
December 10, 2008 
Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Martin Chalfie talks to Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria at the Nobel banquet... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Chalfie talks to Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria at the Nobel banquet at... 
Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Martin Chalfie talks to Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria at the Nobel banquet at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GK1 
December 10, 2008 
Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria (L) is escorted by Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Martin Chalfie as they... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is escorted by Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Chalfie as they arrive at... 
Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria (L) is escorted by Chemistry Nobel Prize winner Martin Chalfie as they arrive at the Nobel banquet at Stockholm's City Hall December 10, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GEW 
December 10, 2008 
Japan's Osamu Shimomura reacts after receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Japan's Shimomura reacts after receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm... 
Japan's Osamu Shimomura reacts after receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The chemistry prize was awarded jointly to Shimomura, and Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien of the U.S. "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GER 
December 10, 2008 
Roger Tsien of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Tsien of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf in Stockholm... 
Roger Tsien of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The chemistry prize was awarded jointly to Tsien, Martin Chalfie of the U.S. and Japan's Osamu Shimomura "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GEQ 
December 10, 2008 
Roger Tsien of the U.S. reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Tsien of the U.S. reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm... 
Roger Tsien of the U.S. reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The chemistry prize was awarded jointly to Tsien, Martin Chalfie of the U.S. and Japan's Osamu Shimomura "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GEP 
December 10, 2008 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Chalfie of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf in... 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S. receives the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The chemistry prize was awarded jointly to Chalfie, Japan's Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien of the U.S. "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL/
RTR22GEN 
December 10, 2008 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S. reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Chalfie of the US reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm... 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S. reacts after receiving the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2008. The chemistry prize was awarded jointly to Chalfie, Japan's Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien of the U.S. "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTR22DYR 
December 08, 2008 
Nobel Chemistry prize winners Osamu Shimomura (C) of Japan, Martin Chalfie (L) of the U.S and Roger Y.... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Nobel Chemistry prize winners Shimomura of Japan, Chalfie and Tsien of the US stand on the stage after... 
Nobel Chemistry prize winners Osamu Shimomura (C) of Japan, Martin Chalfie (L) of the U.S and Roger Y. Tsien of the US stand on the stage after delivering their Nobel lectures at Stockholm University in Stockholm December 8, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBELS/
RTR22CFV 
December 07, 2008 
Roger Tsien (L) and Martin Chalfie of the U.S., two of three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Tsien and Chalfie of the US, two of three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, attend... 
Roger Tsien (L) and Martin Chalfie of the U.S., two of three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, attend a news conference in Stockholm December 7, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBELS/
RTR22CFS 
December 07, 2008 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S., one of three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, attends... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Martin Chalfie of the US, winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, attends a news conference... 
Martin Chalfie of the U.S., one of three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, attends a news conference in Stockholm December 7, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
NOBELS/
RTR22CF4 
December 07, 2008 
Paul Krugman (L), winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics for 2008, talks with Roger Tsien (C) and Martin... 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Krugman, winner of Nobel Prize in Economics, talks with Tsien and Chalfie, winners of Nobel Prize in... 
Paul Krugman (L), winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics for 2008, talks with Roger Tsien (C) and Martin Chalfie, winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, during a news conference in Stockholm December 7, 2008. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN) 
BUSH/
RTXAXEN 
November 24, 2008 
U.S. President George W. Bush welcomes the 2008 Nobel Prize winners to the Oval Office of the White House... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. President Bush welcomes 2008 Nobel Prize winners to the Oval Office in Washington 
U.S. President George W. Bush welcomes the 2008 Nobel Prize winners to the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, November 24, 2008. From L-R are: Economics winner Paul Krugman, of Princeton University; Bush; Chemistry winner Martin Chalfie, of Columbia University and Chemistry winner Roger Tsien, of University of California San Diego. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CK7 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien (C), joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, enjoys a glass of champagne... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, enjoys a glass of champagne in... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien (C), joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, enjoys a glass of champagne with faculty at the University of California San Diego following a press conference at the school in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CJW 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, holds his glass as vice chancellor... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, holds his glass in La Jolla,... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, holds his glass as vice chancellor of health sciences David Brenner pops the cork of a bottle of champagne at the University of California San Diego following a press conference at the school in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CJT 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne at the University of California San Diego following a news conference at the school in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CIY 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference at... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, speaks in La Jolla, California... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference at the University of California San Diego in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CIV 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak at a University... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak in La Jolla, California... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak at a University of California San Diego news conference in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CIQ 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak at a University... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak in La Jolla, California... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to speak at a University of California San Diego news conference in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CIF 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, is poured a glass of champagne... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, waits to drink champagne in La... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, is poured a glass of champagne by vice chancellor of health sciences David Brenner at the University of California San Diego following a news conference at the school in La Jolla, California October 8, 2008. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CI7 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie (L), one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks with colleagues after... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks with colleagues after a news... 
Martin Chalfie (L), one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks with colleagues after a news conference in New York October 8, 2008. American researchers Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien and Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura shared the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein GFP. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CI2 
October 08, 2008 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne... 
La Jolla, UNITED STATES 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne... 
U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, joint 2008 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry, celebrates with a glass of champagne at the University of California San Diego following a news conference at the school October 8, 2008 in La Jolla, California. Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura and Americans Tsien and Martin Chalfie were jointly awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday. They won "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP".
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CF7 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, smiles during a news conference... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, smiles during a news conference in... 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, smiles during a news conference in New York October 8, 2008. American researchers Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien and Japanese researcher Osamu Shimomura shared the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein GFP. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CES 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sits during a press conference... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sits during a news conference in New York... 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sits during a press conference in New York October 8, 2008. Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien shared the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein GFP. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CDI 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, smiles after arriving for a... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in during a news conference... 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, smiles after arriving for a news conference in New York October 8, 2008. Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien shared the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein GFP. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CDH 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in during... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in during a news... 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in during a news conference in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9CCV 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work during a news... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work during a news conference... 
Martin Chalfie, one of the winners of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work during a news conference in New York October 8, 2008. Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien shared the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein GFP. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C1U 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work to journalists while his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work to journalists in New... 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work to journalists while his dog Bernie does tricks in his apartment in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C1O 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is interviewed while trying to take his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is interviewed in New York 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is interviewed while trying to take his dog Bernie for a walk in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein.
REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C1J 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, thinks over a question from a journalist... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, ponders over question from a journalist... 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, thinks over a question from a journalist in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C1E 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks outside his apartment in New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks outside his apartment in New York... 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks outside his apartment in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C1B 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8,... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world.
The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C13 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8,... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world.
The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C10 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks in his apartment in New York shortly... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks in his apartment in New York 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks in his apartment in New York shortly after the announcement October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world. The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTX9C0U 
October 08, 2008 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8,... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York 
Martin Chalfie, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explains his work in New York October 8, 2008. Two Americans and a Japanese researcher won the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery of a glowing jellyfish protein that makes cells, tissues and even organs light up -- a tool used by thousands of researchers around the world.
The 10 million Swedish crown ($1.4 million) prize recognizes Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura, now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego, for their discoveries with green fluorescent protein. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES) 
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