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Search results for: Capitalism

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB5F
August 03, 2020
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to...
Paranaque, Philippines
Filipinos rush out of Philippine capital, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike...
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public transport terminal in Paranaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB5E
August 03, 2020
Filipinos stock up on meat, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid...
Manila, Philippines
Filipinos stock up, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike
Filipinos stock up on meat, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public market in Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB5G
August 03, 2020
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to...
Paranaque, Philippines
Filipinos rush out of Philippine capital, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike...
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public transport terminal in Paranaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB52
August 03, 2020
Filipinos stock up on meat, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid...
Manila, Philippines
Filipinos stock up, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike
Filipinos stock up on meat, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public market in Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB53
August 03, 2020
Filipinos stock up on fish, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid...
Manila, Philippines
Filipinos stock up, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike
Filipinos stock up on fish, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public market in Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB50
August 03, 2020
Filipinos queue outside a pharmacy, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown...
Manila, Philippines
Filipinos stock up, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike
Filipinos queue outside a pharmacy, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public market in Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB4Q
August 03, 2020
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to...
Paranaque, Philippines
Filipinos rush out of Philippine capital, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike...
Filipinos queue for buses going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections spike, at a public transport terminal in Paranaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX7NB4H
August 03, 2020
A man wearing a face mask and shield for coronavirus protection queues to ride a bus going to nearby...
Paranaque, Philippines
Filipinos rush out of Philippine capital, day before stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike...
A man wearing a face mask and shield for coronavirus protection queues to ride a bus going to nearby provinces, a day before the Philippine capital goes back to a stricter lockdown amid COVID-19 infections spike, at a public transport terminal in Paranaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wider Image
Wider Image
Step inside crumbling Malta villa where the Queen lived in her 20s
27 PICTURES
MALTA-QUEEN/RESIDENCE
RTX7MLVE
July 30, 2020
It is the only property outside of Britain that Queen Elizabeth called home. A villa near Malta's capital,...
Pieta, Malta
The Wider Image: Step inside the crumbling villa where Queen Elizabeth spent her 20s
It is the only property outside of Britain that Queen Elizabeth called home. A villa near Malta's capital, Valletta, where the heir to the English throne lived between 1949 and 1951, is about to get a new lease of life as a museum of the Mediterranean island's links with the United Kingdom and the royal family. The arcaded, two-storey property is a shadow of its former self. The rooms are bare, paint is peeling off the walls to reveal old murals beneath, the enclosed garden is overgrown and part of a colonnaded belvedere in it has collapsed. Now that the government of Malta has finally acquired the Villa Guardamangia after years of trying, it hopes to restore it to its former state when it was a charming, if relatively modest home for the future British queen. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "QUEEN ELIZABETH VILLA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNS9
July 24, 2020
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNS8
July 24, 2020
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNRX
July 24, 2020
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNRY
July 24, 2020
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A worker sprays paint on a stencil indicating social distancing on the floor of a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNRR
July 24, 2020
A man wearing a protective face mask sprays a passenger bus, as the spread of the coronavirus disease...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A man wearing a protective face mask sprays a passenger bus, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNRM
July 24, 2020
A man wearing a protective face mask sprays a passenger bus, as the spread of the coronavirus disease...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A man wearing a protective face mask sprays a passenger bus, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTX7LNRD
July 24, 2020
A worker wearing a protective face mask fumigates a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A worker wearing a protective face mask fumigates a bus stop, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in San Jose, Costa Rica July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-MEDICAL WASTE
RTX7LMG6
July 24, 2020
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: "Fear will not fill our bellies": why Indian scavengers risk their lives amid coronavirus...
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other items at an enormous landfill site on the outskirts of New Delhi for nearly 20 years. The $5 daily earnings enable their three children to go to school, in search of a better future than their parents' lives amid the stench of rotting garbage. But over the past few months, increasing amounts of biomedical waste have been arriving at the dump - a result, experts say, of the novel coronavirus pandemic and a huge risk for those who work there. Spread over 52 acres and rising more than 60 metres, the site is littered with used, plastic coronavirus test kits, protective gear and cotton stained with blood and pus - among hundreds of tonnes of waste coming daily from across the Indian capital, including small hospitals and nursing homes. Sifting with bare hands, hundreds of scavengers including children expose themselves to a disease that has infected more than 15 million people globally and claimed over 600,000 lives. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID-19 MEDICAL WASTE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-MEDICAL WASTE
RTX7LIBJ
July 24, 2020
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: "Fear will not fill our bellies": why Indian scavengers risk their lives amid coronavirus...
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other items at an enormous landfill site on the outskirts of New Delhi for nearly 20 years. The $5 daily earnings enable their three children to go to school, in search of a better future than their parents' lives amid the stench of rotting garbage. But over the past few months, increasing amounts of biomedical waste have been arriving at the dump - a result, experts say, of the novel coronavirus pandemic and a huge risk for those who work there. Spread over 52 acres and rising more than 60 metres, the site is littered with used, plastic coronavirus test kits, protective gear and cotton stained with blood and pus ? among hundreds of tonnes of waste coming daily from across the Indian capital, including small hospitals and nursing homes. Sifting with bare hands, hundreds of scavengers including children expose themselves to a disease that has infected more than 15 million people globally and claimed over 600,000 lives. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID-19 MEDICAL WASTE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3KG
July 22, 2020
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak wait for their flights...
Beijing, China
Travellers wait for their flights at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak wait for their flights at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3K9
July 22, 2020
A China Eastern Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport following the...
Beijing, China
China Eastern Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport
A China Eastern Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport following the global coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3JQ
July 22, 2020
A Hainan Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport following the global...
Beijing, China
Hainan Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport
A Hainan Airlines aircraft is seen at the Beijing Capital International Airport following the global coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3JS
July 22, 2020
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk past retail...
Beijing, China
Travellers walk past retail shops at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk past retail shops at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3JO
July 22, 2020
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing...
Beijing, China
Travellers walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3JN
July 22, 2020
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing...
Beijing, China
Travellers walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTX7L3JM
July 22, 2020
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing...
Beijing, China
Travellers walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing
Travellers wearing face masks following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak walk at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China July 22, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
SENEGAL-ENVIRONMENT/COAST
RTX7KXAE
July 21, 2020
Local activists are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness...
Dakar, Senegal
Local activists shoot music video in Dakar
Local activists are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness about the capital's sand erosion threats in Dakar, Senegal June 28, 2020. Picture taken June 28, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
SENEGAL-ENVIRONMENT/COAST
RTX7KXAC
July 21, 2020
A local activist is pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness...
Dakar, Senegal
Local activist is pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness about...
A local activist is pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness about the capital's sand erosion threats in Dakar, Senegal June 28, 2020. Picture taken June 28, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
SENEGAL-ENVIRONMENT/COAST
RTX7KXAA
July 21, 2020
Local activists are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to whip up awareness...
Dakar, Senegal
Local activists are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to whip up awareness...
Local activists are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to whip up awareness of threats to the capital's eroding sand in the coast of Guediawaye on the outskirts of Dakar, Senegal June 21, 2020. Picture taken June 21, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
SENEGAL-ENVIRONMENT/COAST
RTX7KX9M
July 21, 2020
Artists and local activists Fou Malade and Niagass are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore)...
Dakar, Senegal
Artists and local activists Fou Malade and Niagass are pictured in Dakar
Artists and local activists Fou Malade and Niagass are pictured during the shooting of Tefes (the Shore) music video to raise awareness about the capital's sand erosion threats in Dakar, Senegal June 28, 2020. Picture taken June 28, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-GEISHA
RTS3K7OL
July 16, 2020
Ikuko, the "big sister" of Tokyo's Akasaka geisha district, came to the capital to seek her fortune in...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: "It'll take all of our body and soul" - geisha struggle to survive in the shadow of...
Ikuko, the "big sister" of Tokyo's Akasaka geisha district, came to the capital to seek her fortune in 1964, the year Tokyo first hosted the Olympics. But the novel coronavirus pandemic has made her fear for her centuries-old profession as never before. Though the number of geisha - famed for their witty conversation, beauty and skill at traditional arts - has been falling for years, Ikuko and her colleagues were without work for months due to Japan's state of emergency and now operate under awkward social distancing rules. "There were more than 400 geisha in Akasaka when I came, so many I couldn't remember their names. But times changed," Ikuko, now 80, said. Only 20 remain, and there aren't enough engagements to take on new apprentices - especially now. Coronavirus-induced austerity has slashed expense accounts, and many people remain wary of spending hours in the elegant but closed traditional rooms where geisha entertain. Engagements are down 95 percent, and come with new rules: no pouring drinks for customers or touching them even to shake hands, and sitting 2 metres apart. Masks are hard to wear with their elaborate wigs, so they mostly don't. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "GEISHA COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-GEISHA
RTS3K2EA
July 16, 2020
Ikuko, the "big sister" of Tokyo's Akasaka geisha district, came to the capital to seek her fortune in...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: "It'll take all of our body and soul" - geisha struggle to survive in the shadow of...
Ikuko, the "big sister" of Tokyo's Akasaka geisha district, came to the capital to seek her fortune in 1964, the year Tokyo first hosted the Olympics. But the novel coronavirus pandemic has made her fear for her centuries-old profession as never before. Though the number of geisha - famed for their witty conversation, beauty and skill at traditional arts - has been falling for years, Ikuko and her colleagues were without work for months due to Japan's state of emergency and now operate under awkward social distancing rules. "There were more than 400 geisha in Akasaka when I came, so many I couldn't remember their names. But times changed," Ikuko, now 80, said. Only 20 remain, and there aren't enough engagements to take on new apprentices - especially now. Coronavirus-induced austerity has slashed expense accounts, and many people remain wary of spending hours in the elegant but closed traditional rooms where geisha entertain. Engagements are down 95 percent, and come with new rules: no pouring drinks for customers or touching them even to shake hands, and sitting 2 metres apart. Masks are hard to wear with their elaborate wigs, so they mostly don't. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "GEISHA COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Spotlight
Spotlight
Wild animals unable to roam as city encroaches on Nairobi park
14 PICTURES
MEXICO-TELECOMS/CARTELS
RTS3JVQ9
July 15, 2020
A cellular tower is pictured in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken July...
Guadalupe, Mexico
A cellular tower is pictured in the municipality of Guadalupe
A cellular tower is pictured in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken July 6, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
MEXICO-TELECOMS/CARTELS
RTS3JVQ8
July 15, 2020
A man walks by near a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken...
Guadalupe, Mexico
A man walks by near a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe
A man walks by near a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken July 6, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
MEXICO-TELECOMS/CARTELS
RTS3JRB4
July 14, 2020
A woman walks past a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken...
Guadalupe, Mexico
A woman walks past a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe
A woman walks past a cellular tower in the municipality of Guadalupe, Mexico July 6, 2020. Picture taken July 6, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTS3JMKL
July 14, 2020
A woman wearing a protective face mask walks by a wall with graffitis after health authorities reverse...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A woman wearing a protective face mask walks by a wall with graffitis after health authorities reverse the measures of reopening following the increase in cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose, Costa Rica July 13, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTS3JMHZ
July 14, 2020
A couple wearing face masks walk by a wall with graffitis after health authorities reverse the measures...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A couple wearing face masks walk by a wall with graffitis after health authorities reverse the measures of reopening following the increase in cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose, Costa Rica July 13, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTS3JMHQ
July 14, 2020
A woman wearing a face shield asks for money amid concerns over the outbreak of the coronavirus disease...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A woman wearing a face shield asks for money amid concerns over the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose, Costa Rica July 13, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTS3JMHJ
July 14, 2020
A man looks at his cell phone while a pizza restaurant looks closed after health authorities reverse...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
A man looks at his cell phone while a pizza restaurant looks closed after health authorities reverse the measures of reopening following the increase in cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose, Costa Rica July 13, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COSTARICA
RTS3JMHE
July 14, 2020
People walk down San Jose's central avenue after health authorities reverse the measures of reopening...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose
People walk down San Jose's central avenue after health authorities reverse the measures of reopening following amid the increase in cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in San Jose, Costa Rica July 13, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
AIRBUS-RESTRUCTURING/TOULOUSE
RTS3IPG8
July 09, 2020
Employees of Airbus are seen ahead of a walk towards Toulouse-Blagnac airport during a strike called...
Blagnac, France
Employees of Airbus are seen ahead of a walk towards Toulouse-Blagnac airport during a strike called...
Employees of Airbus are seen ahead of a walk towards Toulouse-Blagnac airport during a strike called by unions in Blagnac, near Toulouse, France, July 9, 2020. The banner reads: "to save jobs, you have to pay the capital" REUTERS/Nacho Doce
NILE-CONVERGENCE/
RTS3IP7U
July 09, 2020
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al...
Khartoum, Sudan
The Wider Image: Fears at Nile's convergence in Sudan that new dam will sap river's strength
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al Ameen and his colleagues mould thousands of bricks every day from mud deposited by summer floods. "I consider the Nile something I have not parted with since I was born," Ameen said, as workers around him shaped bricks with blistered hands and laid them out to dry in the sun. "I eat from it, I farm with it. And I extract these bricks from it." But the labourers on Tuti Island in Sudan's capital Khartoum fear a giant dam Ethiopia is building close to the border between the two countries could endanger their livelihood. They worry the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam upstream could weaken the Blue Nile's force, putting at risk an industry that locals say provided bricks for some of Khartoum's first modern public buildings around a century ago. Pottery makers, farmers and fishermen around the Nile's convergence share similar concerns, though other residents displaced by flooding last summer see benefit in a dam that will regulate the powerful river's waters. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra. SEARCH "BENSEMRA NILE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: NILE-CONVERGENCE/ TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SERBIA-PRESIDENT
RTS3IJB8
July 08, 2020
Police offers stand guard near the office of Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, who addressed the nation...
Belgrade, Serbia
Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic addresses the nation in Belgrade
Police offers stand guard near the office of Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, who addressed the nation after riots overnight in the capital of Belgrade, Serbia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Marko Djurica
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