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Search results for: Capoeira-(dance)

CUBA-DAILYLIFE/
RTR4OA9T
February 05, 2015
Capoeira teacher Eiwer Carbonell, 21, warms up before a lesson near his dog Champion, or Campeon in Spanish,...
Havana, Cuba
Capoeira teacher warms up before a lesson near his dog in downtown Havana
Capoeira teacher Eiwer Carbonell, 21, warms up before a lesson near his dog Champion, or Campeon in Spanish, playing around in downtown Havana February 4, 2015. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3X19A
July 04, 2014
Dancers perform the traditional Capoeira, combining aspects of both martial arts and dance, during the...
Fortaleza, Brazil
Dancers perform the traditional Capoeira in Fortaleza
Dancers perform the traditional Capoeira, combining aspects of both martial arts and dance, during the 2014 World Cup in downtown Fortaleza July 2, 2014. In a project called "On The Sidelines" Reuters photographers share pictures showing their own quirky and creative view of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3TX7C
June 15, 2014
Men dance capoeira in downtown Salvador June 15, 2014. Germany and Portugal will play on June 16 in Salvador....
Salvador, Brazil
Men dance capoeira ain downtown Salvador
Men dance capoeira in downtown Salvador June 15, 2014. Germany and Portugal will play on June 16 in Salvador. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (BRAZIL - Tags: WORLD CUP SPORT SOCCER SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3SY0J
June 09, 2014
Brazilian dancers perfom capoeira as England soccer players Danny Welback (4th L) and Adam Lallana (R)...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Brazilian dancers perfom capoeira as England soccer players Welback and Lallana look on during their...
Brazilian dancers perfom capoeira as England soccer players Danny Welback (4th L) and Adam Lallana (R) look on during their visit to a sports complex at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro ahead of the 2014 World Cup, June 9, 2014.
REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCCER SPORT WORLD CUP)
BRAZIL/
RTR3KSAU
April 10, 2014
Brazilian Capoeira masters Ninho (R) and Carlo Alexandre (Carlao) perform as British actor Greg Hicks...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Brazilian Capoeira masters Ninho and Carlao perform as British actor Hicks plays drums at the Nos do...
Brazilian Capoeira masters Ninho (R) and Carlo Alexandre (Carlao) perform as British actor Greg Hicks plays drums at the Nos do Morro company theater in the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (BRAZIL - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)
Society
Society
Dancing in the Dark - 26 Nov 2013
11 PICTURES
BRAZIL/
RTXZFSK
May 09, 2013
Blind capoeira teacher Joao Kanoa jokes with one of his students after giving classes at his home at...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Blind capoeira teacher Kanoa jokes with one of his students after giving classes at his home at the Fallet...
Blind capoeira teacher Joao Kanoa jokes with one of his students after giving classes at his home at the Fallet slum, in Rio de Janeiro March 2, 2013. Kanoa says he lost his vision at work seventeen years ago when the change of temperature inside a cold-storage room damaged his retina. Picture taken March 2, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTXZFS1
May 09, 2013
Blind capoeira teacher Joao Kanoa performs inside a "roda" (wheel) during a session at the Fallet slum,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Blind capoeira teacher Kanoa performs inside a "roda" during session at the Fallet slum, in Rio de Janeiro...
Blind capoeira teacher Joao Kanoa performs inside a "roda" (wheel) during a session at the Fallet slum, in Rio de Janeiro April 26, 2013. Kanoa says he lost his vision at work seventeen years ago when the change of temperature inside a cold-storage room damaged his retina. Picture taken April 26, 2013. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR31F8O
April 30, 2012
Ten-month-old Ana Farias watches a capoeira therapy session at the Association for the Aid of Disabled...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Ten-month-old Ana Farias watches a capoeira therapy session at the AACD in Sao Paulo
Ten-month-old Ana Farias watches a capoeira therapy session at the Association for the Aid of Disabled Children (AACD) in Sao Paulo March 21, 2012. The AACD, a non-profit organization that began in 1950 with just 14 patients, now works with some 8,000 young victims of disabling conditions and diseases such as cerebral palsy to give them better physical skills and improve their lives. Most of the patients are from impoverished or broken homes. Picture taken March 21. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1VH
September 10, 2011
Children play in front of a house painted with graffiti by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children play in front of a house painted with graffiti by artists of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela...
Children play in front of a house painted with graffiti by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1VC
September 10, 2011
Ryan, 6, climbs onto a truck carrying oranges in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Ryan climbs onto a truck carrying oranges in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI in the Vila...
Ryan, 6, climbs onto a truck carrying oranges in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V9
September 10, 2011
Ryan, 6, holds his kite while standing in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Ryan holds his kite while standing in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI in the Vila Flavia...
Ryan, 6, holds his kite while standing in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/NACHO DOCE (BRAZIL - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V7
September 10, 2011
A man rides his motorcycle past graffiti painted by Brazilians artist Altor for OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A man rides his motorcycle past graffiti painted by Brazilians artist Altor for OPNI in the Vila Flavia...
A man rides his motorcycle past graffiti painted by Brazilians artist Altor for OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/NACHO DOCE (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V5
September 10, 2011
A girls uses her mobile phone to listen to music next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Finok working...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A girls uses her mobile phone to listen to music next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Finok working...
A girls uses her mobile phone to listen to music next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Finok working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 24, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V3
September 10, 2011
Artist Tripao (R) teaches a child to spray on a wall during a graffiti class sponsored by OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Artist Tripao teaches a child to spray on a wall during a graffiti class sponsored by OPNI in the Vila...
Artist Tripao (R) teaches a child to spray on a wall during a graffiti class sponsored by OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V2
September 10, 2011
Students of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, paint a wall during...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Students of OPNI paint a wall during a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Students of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, paint a wall during a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1V1
September 10, 2011
Ryan, 6, carries a fence section past graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Ryan carries a fence section past graffiti painted by artists of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao...
Ryan, 6, carries a fence section past graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UZ
September 10, 2011
Children play in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children play in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Children play in front of graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UR
September 10, 2011
Brazilian artists (L-R) Cris, Val, and Toddy (R), founding members of OPNI, an organization that uses...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Brazilian artists Cris, Val, and Toddy pose in front of one of their graffiti works in the Vila Flavia...
Brazilian artists (L-R) Cris, Val, and Toddy (R), founding members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, pose in front of one of their works in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UQ
September 10, 2011
A woman takes a photo of relatives in front of graffiti painted by Brazilian artists Val, Cris and Toddy,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A woman takes a photo of relatives in front of graffiti painted by OPNI members in the Vila Flavia favela...
A woman takes a photo of relatives in front of graffiti painted by Brazilian artists Val, Cris and Toddy, members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UO
September 10, 2011
Young students and members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Young students and members of OPNI attend a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Young students and members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, attend a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UN
September 10, 2011
Children spray their designs on a wall during a graffiti class offered by OPNI, an organization that...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children spray their designs on a wall during a graffiti class offered by OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela...
Children spray their designs on a wall during a graffiti class offered by OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UM
September 10, 2011
Children draw their designs during a graffiti class offered by OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children draw their designs during a graffiti class offered by OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao...
Children draw their designs during a graffiti class offered by OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, at San Mateus em Movimento, their headquarters in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UH
September 10, 2011
Val (R), a founding member of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Val a founding member of OPNI, gives a class to children in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Val (R), a founding member of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, gives a class to children in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UG
September 10, 2011
A child sits with his dog next to graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A child sits with his dog next to graffiti painted by artists of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao...
A child sits with his dog next to graffiti painted by artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UF
September 10, 2011
A woman looks out from a balcony of her home painted with graffiti by Brazilian artists of OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A woman looks out from a balcony of her home painted with graffiti by Brazilian artists of OPNI in the...
A woman looks out from a balcony of her home painted with graffiti by Brazilian artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UE
September 10, 2011
A woman opens the door of her home painted with graffiti from Brazilian artist Shock working with OPNI,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A woman opens the door of her home painted with graffiti from Brazilian artist Shock working with OPNI...
A woman opens the door of her home painted with graffiti from Brazilian artist Shock working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UD
September 10, 2011
Children hold their dogs in their home painted with graffiti by members of OPNI, an organization that...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children hold their dogs in their home painted with graffiti by members of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela...
Children hold their dogs in their home painted with graffiti by members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1UC
September 10, 2011
A woman washes clothes near graffiti painted by Brazilian artists from OPNI, an organization that uses...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A woman washes clothes near graffiti painted by Brazilian artists from OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela...
A woman washes clothes near graffiti painted by Brazilian artists from OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1U7
September 10, 2011
A child runs in front of graffiti painted by Brazlian artists Nem, Tika, Malmeks, Quinho, Joao and members...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A child runs in front of graffiti painted by Brazlian artists in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
A child runs in front of graffiti painted by Brazlian artists Nem, Tika, Malmeks, Quinho, Joao and members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1U5
September 10, 2011
A child sits on stairs of a house next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz, a member of...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A child sits on stairs of a house next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz in the Vila Flavia...
A child sits on stairs of a house next to graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz, a member of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 24, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1U4
September 10, 2011
Artist Ograo sprays a painting during a graffiti class at Sao Mateus em Movimento, the headquarters of...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Artist Ograo sprays a painting during a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Artist Ograo sprays a painting during a graffiti class at Sao Mateus em Movimento, the headquarters of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 24, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TZ
September 10, 2011
A man peers out between graffiti of Brazilian singer Cartola (C) and American civil rights activist Rosa...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A man peers out between graffiti at the OPNI headquarters in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
A man peers out between graffiti of Brazilian singer Cartola (C) and American civil rights activist Rosa Parks (L), painted by Brazilian artists of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, inside OPNI's headquarters in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 24, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TU
September 10, 2011
Children performing a capoeira dance are reflected in a mirror as a girl watches at Sao Mateus em Movimento,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Children performing a capoeira dance are reflected in a mirror as a girl watches in the Vila Flavia favela...
Children performing a capoeira dance are reflected in a mirror as a girl watches at Sao Mateus em Movimento, the headquarters of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TN
September 10, 2011
Val (L) and Cris, founding members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Val and Cris, founding members of OPNI, talk about their graffiti in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo...
Val (L) and Cris, founding members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, talk about their work in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 24, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 24, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TM
September 10, 2011
Rapper Skip, 20, poses in front of a graffiti of South African black activist Steven Biko painted by...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Rapper Skip poses in front of a graffiti of South African black activist Steven Biko in the Vila Flavia...
Rapper Skip, 20, poses in front of a graffiti of South African black activist Steven Biko painted by Brazilian artists working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TK
September 10, 2011
A girl runs next to graffiti painted by Spanish artist Sato by invitation from OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A girl runs next to graffiti painted by Spanish artist Sato by invitation from OPNI in the Vila Flavia...
A girl runs next to graffiti painted by Spanish artist Sato by invitation from OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TH
September 10, 2011
A woman sits next to graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Woman sits next to graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo...
A woman sits next to graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TE
September 10, 2011
A man jokes with Ryan, 6, in front of graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI, an organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A man jokes with Ryan in front of graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela...
A man jokes with Ryan, 6, in front of graffiti painted by artists working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1TB
September 10, 2011
Students of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, paint a wall during...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Students of OPNI paint a wall during a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Students of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, paint a wall during a graffiti class in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY WEALTH EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1T8
September 10, 2011
A woman carries a box as she walks past graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz working with OPNI,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
A woman carries a box as she walks past graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz working with OPNI...
A woman carries a box as she walks past graffiti painted by Brazilian artist Chivitiz working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1T3
September 10, 2011
People walk past graffiti painted by members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
People walk past graffitis painted by members of OPNI in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
People walk past graffiti painted by members of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 25, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else, or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance, and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 25, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1T1
September 10, 2011
Alessandra, 24, and her son Riquelme, 4, pose in front of graffiti painted by Brazilian artists working...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Alessandra and her son Riquelme pose in front of graffiti in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo
Alessandra, 24, and her son Riquelme, 4, pose in front of graffiti painted by Brazilian artists working with OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 26, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else, or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance, and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2R1SU
September 10, 2011
Graffiti artist Toddy, a founding member of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Graffiti artist Toddy, a founding member of OPNI, puts the final touches on a wall in the Vila Flavia...
Graffiti artist Toddy, a founding member of OPNI, an organization that uses graffiti to improve life in the slums, puts the final touches on a wall in the Vila Flavia favela of Sao Paulo August 27, 2011. OPNI, a Portuguese acronym which means "Unidentified Graffiti Artists", was formed in 1997 by some 20 youths in Sao Paulo's marginal slums with the goal of transforming the streets into an open-air gallery where the community can express its gripes and denounce social injustices. With only three of the original founding members left after most were either arrested, abandoned the activity to do something else or died from drug abuse, OPNI offers workshops in art, capoeira dance and graffiti to the community. Their current project is called "Favela Graffitada" and the organization has extended invitations to national and international artists to create over 100 graffiti works throughout the favela. Picture taken August 27, 2011. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2QLIK
August 31, 2011
Miss Universe 2011 contestants look at a capoeira dance at Casa do Zezinho, non-governmental organization...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Miss Universe 2011 contestants look at a capoeira dance at Casa do Zezinho, non-governmental organization...
Miss Universe 2011 contestants look at a capoeira dance at Casa do Zezinho, non-governmental organization in Sao Paulo August 31, 2011. The contestants are in Sao Paulo for the 2011 Miss Universe pageant which will be held September 12. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
BRAZIL/
RTR2QLG6
August 31, 2011
Miss Universe 2011 contestants attend a capoeira dance presentation at Meninos do Morumbi non governmental...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Miss Universe 2011 contestants attend a capoeira dance presentation at Meninos do Morumbi NGO in Sao...
Miss Universe 2011 contestants attend a capoeira dance presentation at Meninos do Morumbi non governmental organization in Sao Paulo August 31, 2011. The contestants are in Sao Paulo for the 2011 Miss Universe pageant which will be held September 12. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
RUSSIA/
RTR2OHRP
July 05, 2011
Candidates for the Miss Krasnoyarsk 2011 beauty competition (in white shirts) participate with other...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Candidates for the Miss Krasnoyarsk 2011 beauty competition participate with other townspeople during...
Candidates for the Miss Krasnoyarsk 2011 beauty competition (in white shirts) participate with other townspeople during a Brazilian capoeira lesson at the Tatyshev Island Park in Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, July 5, 2011. Instructors of various sports techniques, from fitness to Brazilian dance, help people stay active daily with outdoor sessions, an initiative of the city administration during the summer. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: SOCIETY)
SPAIN/
RTR2MELY
May 13, 2011
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Palma De Mallorca, Spain
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral in the Balearic island of Mallorca May 14, 2011. This group of professional Capoeira dancers holds shows every Saturday, featuring the Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. REUTERS/Enrique Calvo (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT)
SPAIN/
RTR2MELW
May 13, 2011
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Palma De Mallorca, Spain
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral in the Balearic island of Mallorca May 14, 2011. This group of professional Capoeira dancers holds shows every Saturday, featuring the Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. REUTERS/Enrique Calvo (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
SPAIN/
RTR2MEL9
May 13, 2011
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Palma De Mallorca, Spain
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral...
Members of the Abada Capoeira group perform capoeira moves at a park next to Palma de Mallorca's Cathedral in the Balearic island of Mallorca May 14, 2011. This group of professional Capoeira dancers holds shows every Saturday, featuring the Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. REUTERS/Enrique Calvo (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT)
ISRAEL/
RTR2M9RK
May 11, 2011
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv May 11,...
Tel Aviv, Israel
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv May 11, 2011. A group of international professionals are in Israel for a 4 day Capoeira festival, holding shows and workshops of the Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)
ISRAEL/
RTR2M9RI
May 11, 2011
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv May 11,...
Tel Aviv, Israel
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv
People watch professionals Capoeira dancers as they perform moves on the promenade in Tel Aviv May 11, 2011. A group of international professionals are in Israel for a 4 day Capoeira festival, holding shows and workshops of the Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-OBAMA
RTR2K46F
March 19, 2011
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches with her daughters Malia and Sasha a demonstration of capoeira,...
Brasilia, Brazil
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches with her daughters Malia and Sasha a demonstration of capoeira...
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches with her daughters Malia and Sasha a demonstration of capoeira, a traditional Brazilian martial art combined with dance, during a cultural performance with young Brazilians who have participated in a range of U.S.-sponsored development programs, in Brasilia, March 19, 2011. The Obamas are on the first leg of a three-country tour of Latin America. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS)
BRAZIL-OBAMA
RTR2K409
March 19, 2011
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (L) talks to her daughter Sasha as they watch a demonstration of capoeira,...
Brasilia, Brazil
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches with her daughters Malia and Sasha a demonstration of capoeira...
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (L) talks to her daughter Sasha as they watch a demonstration of capoeira, traditional Brazilian martial art converted into dance, during a cultural performance with young Brazilians who have participated in a range of U.S.-sponsored development programs, in Brasilia March 19, 2011. Also attending the event are Michelle Obama's mother Marian Robinson (R) and her other daughter Malia. The Obamas are on the first leg of a three-country tour of Latin America. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS)
BRAZIL-OBAMA/
RTR2K3YG
March 19, 2011
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches a demonstration of capoeira, traditional Brazilian martial art...
Brasilia, Brazil
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches a demonstration of capoeira in Brasilia
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches a demonstration of capoeira, traditional Brazilian martial art converted into dance, during a cultural performance with young Brazilians who have participated in a range of U.S.-sponsored development programs, in Brasilia, March 19, 2011. The Obamas are on the first leg of a three-country tour of Latin America. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS)
BRAZIL-OBAMA/
RTR2K3XF
March 19, 2011
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters Malia (not pictured) and Sasha (R) watch a demonstration...
Brasilia, Brazil
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama watches capoeira during a cultural performance in Brasilia
U.S. first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters Malia (not pictured) and Sasha (R) watch a demonstration of capoeira, traditional Brazilian martial art converted into dance, during a cultural performance with young Brazilians who have participated in a range of U.S.-sponsored development programs, in Brasilia, March 19, 2011. The Obamas are on the first leg of a three-country tour of Latin America. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR28KKL
January 06, 2010
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Sydney, Australia
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, January 6, 2010. Bale de Rua consists of two vocalists and 15 dancers who perform a mixture of samba, African dance, hip-hop and capoeira. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. The group will perform 12 shows at the opera house as part of the Sydney Festival 2010. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR28KKK
January 06, 2010
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Sydney, Australia
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, January 6, 2010. Bale de Rua consists of two vocalists and 15 dancers who perform a mixture of samba, African dance, hip-hop and capoeira. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. The group will perform 12 shows at the opera house as part of the Sydney Festival 2010. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR28KJS
January 06, 2010
A member of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua performs during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Sydney, Australia
A member of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua performs during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
A member of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua performs during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, January 6, 2010. Bale de Rua consists of two vocalists and 15 dancers who perform a mixture of samba, African dance, hip-hop and capoeira. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. The group will perform 12 shows at the opera house as part of the Sydney Festival 2010. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR28KJO
January 06, 2010
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Sydney, Australia
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney...
Members of the Brazilian dance group Bale de Rua perform during a photo call on the steps of the Sydney Opera House, January 6, 2010. Bale de Rua consists of two vocalists and 15 dancers who perform a mixture of samba, African dance, hip-hop and capoeira. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian dance style which combines music and martial arts. The group will perform 12 shows at the opera house as part of the Sydney Festival 2010. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
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