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Search results for: Cardiovascular-disease

SOUTH-SUDAN/AID
RTR34SA3 
July 10, 2012 
Blood samples to be tested for malaria are seen at the Aweil State Hospital in Aweil, the only hospital... 
Aweil, South Sudan 
Blood samples to be tested for malaria are seen at the Aweil State Hospital in Aweil, the only hospital... 
Blood samples to be tested for malaria are seen at the Aweil State Hospital in Aweil, the only hospital in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal, June 2, 2012. As in many developing nations, international aid is both an invaluable help to South Sudan and a crutch that sometimes enables it to avoid reality. Development experts have grown more sophisticated in recent decades about how they deliver aid. But in fragile states such as South Sudan, getting the balance right between helping a country and helping that country help itself remains incredibly difficult. Picture taken June 2, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/AID REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian (SOUTH SUDAN - Tags: ANNIVERSARY HEALTH SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
GULF-DIABETES/
RTR34KX0 
July 04, 2012 
A general view shows the interior of the Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC) in Abu Dhabi,... 
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 
A general view shows the interior of the Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC) in Abu Dhabi... 
A general view shows the interior of the Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC) in Abu Dhabi, June 13, 2012. Genetic factors apparently contribute to the Gulf's high incidence of diabetes, an incurable disease in which the body has difficulty absorbing sugars and which is closely associated with obesity, scientists say. It can lead to cardiovascular problems, blindness, strokes and kidney disease. Picture taken June 13, 2012. To match Feature GULF-DIABETES/ REUTERS/Ghazal Watfa (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH) 
HAITI
RTR31W20 
May 11, 2012 
Cheruben Destine calls friends and family to find volunteers to donate blood to his daughter Fabien,... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Cheruben Destine calls friends and family to find volunteers to donate blood to his daughter to have... 
Cheruben Destine calls friends and family to find volunteers to donate blood to his daughter Fabien, 14, to have an operation to close a hole in her heart chambers, outside the Haitian Red Cross blood center, in Port-au-Prince April 17, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 17, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31W14 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (R), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease does light chores at home in Port-au-Prince... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (R), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, does light chores at home in Port-au-Prince, March 24, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31W13 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian cardiologist Michael Theard examines a child to determine the severity of his heart defect in... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian cardiologist examines a child to determine the severity of his heart defect in Port-au-Prince... 
Haitian cardiologist Michael Theard examines a child to determine the severity of his heart defect in Port-au-Prince April 14, 2012. Eleven children are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 14, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31W0W 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, looks through family photos at home in... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, looks through family photos at home in Port-au-Prince, March 24, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZT 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, smiles after her checkup a week after the operation to close a hole... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl smiles after undergoing heart surgery a week ago in Port-au-Prince 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, smiles after her checkup a week after the operation to close a hole in the wall of her heart chambers, in Port-au-Prince April 28, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZO 
May 11, 2012 
Surgeons Francois Lacour-Gayet (L), of Montefiore Medical Center, and Daniel Roux La of Chaine de L'Espoir,... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Surgeons operate on a Haitian girl to close the hole between her heart chambers, in Port-au-Prince 
Surgeons Francois Lacour-Gayet (L), of Montefiore Medical Center, and Daniel Roux La of Chaine de L'Espoir, perform surgery to close the hole between the heart chambers of Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, in Port-au-Prince April 19, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZN 
May 11, 2012 
Surgeons operate on Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Surgeons operate on a Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, in Port-au-Prince 
Surgeons operate on Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, in the Degand Clinic in Port-au-Prince, April 19, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZL 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, is prepared for surgery to close the hole,... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, is prepared for surgery to close the hole, in the Degand Clinic in Port-au-Prince, April 19, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZG 
May 11, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, smiles after her checkup a week after the operation to close a hole... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl smiles after undergoing heart surgery a week ago in Port-au-Prince 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, smiles after her checkup a week after the operation to close a hole in the wall of her heart chambers, in Port-au-Prince April 28, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZB 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, is examined by a doctor a week after the operation to close a hole in... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl is examined by a doctor a week after undergoing heart surgery in Port-au-Prince 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, is examined by a doctor a week after the operation to close a hole in the wall of her heart chambers, in Port-au-Prince April 28, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, are receiving surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZ6 
May 10, 2012 
The hand of Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, lies on the edge of the operating table as surgeons from... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
The hand of Haitian girl Fabien Destine lies on the edge of the operating table in Port-au-Prince 
The hand of Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, lies on the edge of the operating table as surgeons from an international cardiac mission operate on her for a hole in her heart chamber, in Port-au-Prince, April 19, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZ3 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, walks to her home in Port-au-Prince 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, walks to her home in Port-au-Prince, March 24, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VZ0 
May 10, 2012 
A doctor from an international cardiac mission examines the x-ray of a patient's heart in the Degand... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A doctor from an international cardiac mission examines the x-ray of a patient's heart in the Degand... 
A doctor from an international cardiac mission examines the x-ray of a patient's heart in the Degand Clinic in Port-au-Prince, April 15, 2012. Eleven children will receive surgery to correct serious heart ailments provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 15, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VYX 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
A Haitian girl who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease waits as she is prepped for surgery to close... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, waits as she is prepped for surgery to close the hole, in the Degand Clinic in Port-au-Prince, April 19, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VXJ 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (R), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, stands with her mother and... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (R), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, stands with her mother and brother near their home in Port-au-Prince, March 24, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VXC 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (3rd L), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Haitian heart patient Fabien Destine waits with other patients inside the Degand Clinic in Port-au-Prince... 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine (3rd L), 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, waits with other patients inside the Degand Clinic to be examined by an international cardiac mission in Port-au-Prince, April 15, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 15, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VX3 
May 10, 2012 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Heart patient Fabien Destine is reflected in a mirror at her home in Port-au-Prince 
Haitian girl Fabien Destine, 14, who suffers from VSP congenital heart disease, or a hole in the chamber wall, is reflected in a mirror at her home in Port-au-Prince, March 24, 2012. Eleven children, including Destine, will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
HAITI
RTR31VX0 
May 10, 2012 
Children with serious heart ailments wait outside the Degand Clinic to be examined by an international... 
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti 
Children wait to be examined to see if they will be selected for surgery in Port-au-Prince 
Children with serious heart ailments wait outside the Degand Clinic to be examined by an international mission of cardiologists to see if they will be selected for surgery, in Port-au-Prince April 14, 2012. Eleven children will receive surgery provided by a mission of pediatric cardiovascular surgeons, doctors and nurses from France's La Chaine de L'Espoir and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Among Haiti's population of 10 million, health officials estimate there are around 10,000 cases of rheumatic and congenital heart disease, which according to the World Health Organization are the number one cause of death globally. Picture taken April 14. REUTERS/Swoan Parker (HAITI - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS) 
CHINA-GENETICS/SHEEP
RTR3152A 
April 24, 2012 
Researchers work inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute... 
Shenzhen, China 
Researchers work inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute... 
Researchers work inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen, southern China April 23, 2012. Chinese scientists have cloned a genetically modified sheep containing a "good" type of fat found naturally in nuts, seeds, fish and leafy greens that helps reduce the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. Picture taken April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS) 
CHINA-GENETICS/SHEEP
RTR31525 
April 24, 2012 
A researcher works inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute... 
Shenzhen, China 
A researcher works inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute... 
A researcher works inside a laboratory for experiments related to cloning at the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen, southern China April 23, 2012. Chinese scientists have cloned a genetically modified sheep containing a "good" type of fat found naturally in nuts, seeds, fish and leafy greens that helps reduce the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. Picture taken April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS) 
CHINA-GENETICS/SHEEP
RTR31523 
April 24, 2012 
Peng Peng (below), a cloned sheep, is seen on a video display at the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen,... 
Shenzhen, China 
Peng Peng, a cloned sheep, is seen on a video display at the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen 
Peng Peng (below), a cloned sheep, is seen on a video display at the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen, southern China April 23, 2012. Chinese scientists have cloned a genetically modified sheep containing a "good" type of fat found naturally in nuts, seeds, fish and leafy greens that helps reduce the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. "Peng Peng", which has a roundworm fat gene, weighed in at 5.74 kg when it was born on March 26 in a laboratory in China's far western region of Xinjiang. Picture taken April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS) 
MYANMAR/
RTR2Y8F7 
February 22, 2012 
A lab worker holds up a test-tube of blood before conducting HIV tests at Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Lab worker holds up a test-tube of blood before conducting HIV tests at Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland's... 
A lab worker holds up a test-tube of blood before conducting HIV tests at Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland (AZG)'s clinic in Yangon February 21, 2012. Tens of thousands of lives are at risk in Myanmar due to an anticipated funding shortfall to treat people living with HIV and tuberculosis, medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) warned Wednesday, urging international donors to provide immediate support to the impoverished country. Myanmar is already facing "a devastating gap" between people's needs and access to treatment and a decision by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria to cancel funding for 2013 because of a lack of donor money could worsen the situation, the report "Lives in the balance: the urgent need for HIV and TB treatment in Myanmar" said. Picture taken February 21, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH) 
MYANMAR/
RTR2Y8ER 
February 22, 2012 
HIV tests show negative and positive results in Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland (AZG)'s clinic in Yangon... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
HIV tests show negative and positive results in Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland's clinic in Yangon 
HIV tests show negative and positive results in Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland (AZG)'s clinic in Yangon February 21, 2012. Tens of thousands of lives are at risk in Myanmar due to an anticipated funding shortfall to treat people living with HIV and tuberculosis, medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) warned Wednesday, urging international donors to provide immediate support to the impoverished country. Myanmar is already facing "a devastating gap" between people's needs and access to treatment and a decision by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria to cancel funding for 2013 because of a lack of donor money could worsen the situation, the report "Lives in the balance: the urgent need for HIV and TB treatment in Myanmar" said. Picture taken February 21, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USDJ 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt holds a centrifuge tube containing the harvested... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt holds a centrifuge tube containing the harvested product ixmyelocel-T in the laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USDH 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt removes tissue culture and harvest solution from... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt removes tissue culture and harvest solution from a centrifuge tube in the laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USDG 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt works with harvested ixmyelocel-T product in centrifuge... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt works with harvested ixmyelocel-T product in centrifuge tubes in the laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USDE 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt holds up harvested ixmyelocel-T product and solution... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt holds up harvested ixmyelocel-T product and solution in centrifuge tubes at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USDC 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt views harvested ixmyelocel-T product through a... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences Research Associate Judith Schmitt views harvested ixmyelocel-T product through a microscope in the laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USD7 
December 03, 2011 
The logo of Aastrom Biosciences Inc is seen on an incubator in a laboratory at their headquarters in... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
The logo of Aastrom Biosciences Inc is seen on an incubator in a laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH LOGO) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USD3 
December 03, 2011 
An Aastrom Biosciences production assistant holds a 'for research only' product bag containing the company's... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
An Aastrom Biosciences production assistant holds a 'for research only' product bag containing the company's cell product ixmyelocel-T in the clean room laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USD0 
December 03, 2011 
An Aastrom Biosciences production assistant holds a 'for research only' product bag containing the company's... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
An Aastrom Biosciences production assistant holds a 'for research only' product bag containing the company's cell product ixmyelocel-T in the clean room laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USCX 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Mary Cheeramvelil works at 'priming' cell cassettes for incubation... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Mary Cheeramvelil works at 'priming' cell cassettes for incubation in the clean room laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USCU 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Marlo Ives places a bag of 'Base Medium' into an automated cell... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Marlo Ives places a bag of 'Base Medium' into an automated cell processing system in the clean room laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH) 
STEMCELLS/
RTR2USCR 
December 03, 2011 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Marlo Ives places a bag of 'Base Medium' into an automated cell... 
Ann Arbor, UNITED STATES 
To match Insight STEMCELLS/ 
Aastrom Biosciences production assistant Marlo Ives places a bag of 'Base Medium' into an automated cell processing system in the clean room laboratory at their headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan November 29, 2011. Aastrom BioSciences Inc recently presented promising results from a mid-stage trial of its treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia, a disease in which blood flow to the extremities is restricted, at the American Heart Association's annual meeting. We're actually developing products now," said Tim Mayleben, chief executive of Aastrom Biosciences Inc, which is using cells derived from patients' own bone marrow to develop treatments for cardiovascular disease. Photo taken November 29, 2011. To match Insight STEMCELLS/ REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
SALVADOR/
RTR2UQ1G 
December 01, 2011 
A nurse takes blood for a free HIV test, during an HIV/AIDS awareness rally on World AIDS Day in San... 
San Salvador, El Salvador 
A nurse takes blood for a free HIV test, during an HIV/AIDS awareness rally on World AIDS Day in San... 
A nurse takes blood for a free HIV test, during an HIV/AIDS awareness rally on World AIDS Day in San Salvador December 1, 2011. REUTERS/Luis Galdamez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: HEALTH) 
GREECE/
RTR2U3HI 
November 16, 2011 
EDITORIAL USE ONLY - NO COMMERCIAL OR BOOK SALES. A used syringe and traces of blood are seen in central... 
Athens, Greece 
A used syringe and traces of blood are seen in central Athens' Panepistimiou street 
EDITORIAL USE ONLY - NO COMMERCIAL OR BOOK SALES. A used syringe and traces of blood are seen in central Athens' Panepistimiou street, at an area where drug addicts gather, November 16, 2011. Athens Mayor Giorgos Kaminis believes that there will be a fall in crime in the city center from next month, when drug rehabilitation centers are relocated. "Drug addicts will begin leaving the downtown area in mid-October when the methadone centers move," he told Skai radio station in an interview on September 30, 2011. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (GREECE - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY) 
HEALTH-ECOLI/
RTR2NCXF 
June 06, 2011 
A nurse assists a man donating blood at a blood drive of the German red cross (DRK) in Berlin, June 6,... 
Berlin, Germany 
A nurse assists man donatING blood at blood drive of the German red cross in Berlin 
A nurse assists a man donating blood at a blood drive of the German red cross (DRK) in Berlin, June 6, 2011. German hospitals are struggling to cope with the flood of E.coli victims, as scientists remain puzzled by the deadly bug that has killed 22 and sickened 2,200 people across Europe. Hospitals in the northern port city of Hamburg, the epicentre of the outbreak that began three weeks ago,have been moving out patients with less serious illnesses to handle the surge of people stricken by the rare and virulent bacteria. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANYPOLITICS - Tags: HEALTH) POLITICS) 
INDONESIA/
RTR2N1I3 
May 29, 2011 
Dog skulls are seen at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near the Indonesian city... 
Bantul, Indonesia 
Dog skulls are seen at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul 
Dog skulls are seen at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta May 29, 2011. The Suwardi family has been running a dog slaughter business since 1985, and up to 30 dogs are killed everyday for their meat, which consumers believe can cure skin diseases and boost vitality. The Suwardi family buys the dogs at about 150,000 rupiah ($17.50) each. A meal comprising of dog meat and plain rice costs about 8000 rupiah ($0.90). REUTERS/Dwi Oblo (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD) 
INDONESIA/
RTR2N1I1 
May 29, 2011 
Dog bones are seen near a chopping board at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near... 
Bantul, Indonesia 
Dog bones are seen near a chopping board at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul 
Dog bones are seen near a chopping board at a slaughter shop in Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta May 29, 2011. The Suwardi family has been running a dog slaughter business since 1985, and up to 30 dogs are killed everyday for their meat, which consumers believe can cure skin diseases and boost vitality. The Suwardi family buys the dogs at about 150,000 rupiah ($17.50) each. A meal comprising of dog meat and plain rice costs about 8000 rupiah ($0.90). REUTERS/Dwi Oblo (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD) 
INDONESIA/
RTR2N1HZ 
May 29, 2011 
A worker cuts up a dog carcass during the slaughter process at Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near... 
Bantul, Indonesia 
A worker cuts up a dog carcass during the slaughter process at Bambanglipuro village in Bantul 
A worker cuts up a dog carcass during the slaughter process at Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta May 29, 2011. The Suwardi family has been running a dog slaughter business since 1985, and up to 30 dogs are killed everyday for their meat, which consumers believe can cure skin diseases and boost vitality. The Suwardi family buys the dogs at about 150,000 rupiah ($17.50) each. A meal comprising of dog meat and plain rice costs about 8000 rupiah ($0.90). REUTERS/Dwi Oblo (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD) 
INDONESIA/
RTR2N1GB 
May 29, 2011 
The shadow of a worker using a stick to club a dog before slaughter is seen, at Bambanglipuro village... 
Bantul, Indonesia 
The shadow of a worker using a stick to club a dog before slaughter is seen, at Bambanglipuro village... 
The shadow of a worker using a stick to club a dog before slaughter is seen, at Bambanglipuro village in Bantul, near the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta May 29, 2011. The Suwardi family has been running a dog slaughter business since 1985, and up to 30 dogs are killed everyday for their meat, which consumers believe can cure skin diseases and boost vitality. The Suwardi family buys the dogs at about 150,000 rupiah ($17.50) each. A meal comprising of dog meat and plain rice costs about 8000 rupiah ($0.90). REUTERS/Dwi Oblo (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
VIETNAM/
RTR2MUD1 
May 24, 2011 
A boy smiles at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in Hanoi May 24, 2011. More than 10,000 children... 
Hanoi, Vietnam 
A boy smiles at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in Hanoi 
A boy smiles at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in Hanoi May 24, 2011. More than 10,000 children in Vietnam are diagnosed with heart diseases per year, but only half of them can receive surgical operation services, state media reported. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY) 
VIETNAM/
RTR2MUCU 
May 24, 2011 
Tran Van Duy, 2, is carried on her mother's shoulder at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in... 
Hanoi, Vietnam 
Tran Van Duy is carried on her mother's shoulder at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in Hanoi... 
Tran Van Duy, 2, is carried on her mother's shoulder at the cardiovascular center of the E hospital in Hanoi May 24, 2011. More than 10,000 children in Vietnam are diagnosed with heart diseases per year, but only half of them can receive surgical operation services, state media reported. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY) 
KUWAIT/
RTR2ML1P 
May 18, 2011 
Kuwaiti Interventional Cardiologist Dr Ibrahim Al-Rashdan (R) performs a PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention)... 
Kuwait City, Kuwait 
Kuwaiti Interventional Cardiologist Dr Ibrahim Al-Rashdan performs a PCI stent implantation surgery at... 
Kuwaiti Interventional Cardiologist Dr Ibrahim Al-Rashdan (R) performs a PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) stent implantation surgery during a satellite transmission, at the Chest Diseases Hospital in Kuwait City May 18, 2011, aided by Dr Atef Habashy and main nurse Dia Ibrahim (L). The surgery was transmitted live via satellite to an audience at the EuroPCR 2011 Cardiovascular Conference held in Paris. REUTERS/Stephanie McGehee (KUWAIT - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
INDONESIA/
RTR2KPLS 
April 02, 2011 
A worker kills a cobra for its meat at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1,... 
Yogyakarta, Indonesia 
A worker holds a Cobra before killing it for its meat at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of... 
A worker kills a cobra for its meat at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers say they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility. Picture taken April 1, 2011. REUTERS/Dwi Oblo (INDONESIA - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD ANIMALS IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
BIOTERROR-AFRICA/
RTR2ILNB 
February 14, 2011 
An ecologist extracts a sample of blood from a Mastomys Natalensis rodent in the village of Jormu in... 
JORMU, Sierra Leone 
To match Reuters-Feature BIOTERROR-AFRICA/ 
An ecologist extracts a sample of blood from a Mastomys Natalensis rodent in the village of Jormu in southeastern Sierra Leone February 8, 2011. Lassa fever, named after the Nigerian town where it was first identified in 1969, is among a U.S. list of "category A" diseases -- deemed to have the potential for major public health impact -- alongside anthrax and botulism. The disease is carried by the Mastomys Natalensis rodent, found across sub-Saharan Africa and often eaten as a source of protein. It infects an estimated 300,000-500,000 people each year, and kills about 5,000. Picture taken February 8, 2011. To match Reuters-Feature BIOTERROR-AFRICA/ REUTERS/Simon Akam (SIERRA LEONE - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY ANIMALS) 
VIETNAM/
RTXV8MQ 
November 30, 2010 
A health worker holds up a blood sample at the 09 Hospital in Hanoi November 30, 2010. The hospital is... 
Hanoi, Vietnam 
A health worker holds up a blood sample at the 09 Hospital in Hanoi 
A health worker holds up a blood sample at the 09 Hospital in Hanoi November 30, 2010. The hospital is Northern Vietnam's first and only institution which provides treatment for HIV/AIDS patients suffering in the last stage of the disease. Established as a clinic for HIV/AIDS patients in 2002, the place was turned into a full-fledged hospital in December 2009. There are some 180,312 infected patients in Vietnam, according to a September 30, 2010 statistic report. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY) 
HAITI-ELECTIONS/
RTXV17F 
November 25, 2010 
A man with cholera receives treatment in a clinic set up by International Red Cross in Port-au-Prince... 
Port Au Prince, Haiti 
A man with cholera receives treatment in a clinic set up by International Red Cross in Port-au-Prince... 
A man with cholera receives treatment in a clinic set up by International Red Cross in Port-au-Prince November 24, 2010. A raging cholera epidemic in Haiti may deter some voters from participating in Sunday's national elections, but postponing or canceling the polls could threaten stability in the Caribbean country, the European Union's envoy said on Monday. REUTERS/Kena Betancur (HAITI - Tags: DISASTER HEALTH POLITICS IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
RTXTC2F 
October 12, 2010 
HEALTH-HEART/PUMP - Illustrated factbox on artificial heart devices, including Thoratec?s Heartmate II,... 
HEALTH-HEART/PUMP C 
HEALTH-HEART/PUMP - Illustrated factbox on artificial heart devices, including Thoratec?s Heartmate II, showing how they work. Accompanies Reuters special report HEALTH-HEART/PUMP which moves by 1400 GMT. RNGS. (SIN03) 
USA/
RTXT13Y 
October 04, 2010 
Anthony Cavello, Surgical Assistant (R) holds his finger in an incision in the inflated abdomen of Carolyn... 
Denver, UNITED STATES 
Anthony Cavello, Surgical Assistant holds his finger in an incision in Denver 
Anthony Cavello, Surgical Assistant (R) holds his finger in an incision in the inflated abdomen of Carolyn Dawson as he assists Dr. Michael Snyder performing a laparoscopic gastric bypass on Dawson at Rose Medical Center in Denver August 30, 2010. Snyder does four types of bariatric procedures completing 451 just last year. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES) 
RTR2H71J 
August 10, 2010 
CHENEY-HEART/ - Diagram explaining the HeartMate II heart pump device that U.S. media report former U.S.... 
CHENEY-HEART/ C 
CHENEY-HEART/ - Diagram explaining the HeartMate II heart pump device that U.S. media report former U.S. Vice President has had implanted. RNGS. (SIN05) 
BRITAIN
RTR286IY 
September 23, 2009 
A man walks near the river Thames in London, September 23, 2009. A survey published in Britain on Wednesday... 
London, United Kingdom 
A man walks near the river Thames in London 
A man walks near the river Thames in London, September 23, 2009. A survey published in Britain on Wednesday found the majority of people who are obese do not believe they are, whereas the measurements of more than a quarter of those questioned suggested their beliefs to be wrong because they were in fact obese, local media reported. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN HEALTH SOCIETY) 
SLOVENIA/
RTR26DP6 
August 03, 2009 
A man injects heroin into a vein in his hand at an abandoned house in Ljubljana August 3, 2009.
REUTERS/Bor... 
Ljubljana, Slovenia 
A man injects heroin into a vein in his hand at an abandoned house in Ljubljana 
A man injects heroin into a vein in his hand at an abandoned house in Ljubljana August 3, 2009.
REUTERS/Bor Slana (SLOVENIA PEOPLE SOCIETY) 
INDONESIA/
RTXOWX8 
May 29, 2009 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi... 
Makassar, Indonesia 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May 29, 2009. The World Health Organisation called on Tuesday for a global ban on smoking at work and in enclosed public places. The United Nations agency said a ban would help limit non-smokers' exposure to second-hand smoke, which can kill through heart disease and serious respiratory and cardiovascular illness. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA SOCIETY HEALTH IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
INDONESIA/
RTXOWX5 
May 29, 2009 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province... 
Makassar, Indonesia 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May 29, 2009. The World Health Organisation called on Tuesday for a global ban on smoking at work and in enclosed public places. The United Nations agency said a ban would help limit non-smokers' exposure to second-hand smoke, which can kill through heart disease and serious respiratory and cardiovascular illness. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA SOCIETY HEALTH) 
INDONESIA/
RTXOWWX 
May 29, 2009 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province... 
Makassar, Indonesia 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar 
A worker mixes sugar with tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May 29, 2009. The World Health Organisation called on Tuesday for a global ban on smoking at work and in enclosed public places. The United Nations agency said a ban would help limit non-smokers' exposure to second-hand smoke, which can kill through heart disease and serious respiratory and cardiovascular illness. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA SOCIETY HEALTH) 
INDONESIA/
RTXOWWI 
May 29, 2009 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi... 
Makassar, Indonesia 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar 
A worker smokes a cigarette during at a tobacco processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May 29, 2009. The World Health Organisation called on Tuesday for a global ban on smoking at work and in enclosed public places. The United Nations agency said a ban would help limit non-smokers' exposure to second-hand smoke, which can kill through heart disease and serious respiratory and cardiovascular illness. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA SOCIETY HEALTH IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
INDONESIA/
RTXOWWD 
May 29, 2009 
A worker carries tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May... 
Makassar, Indonesia 
A worker carries tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar 
A worker carries tobacco at a processing factory in Makassar, Indonesia's south Sulawesi province May 29, 2009. The World Health Organisation called on Tuesday for a global ban on smoking at work and in enclosed public places. The United Nations agency said a ban would help limit non-smokers' exposure to second-hand smoke, which can kill through heart disease and serious respiratory and cardiovascular illness. REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA HEALTH SOCIETY) 
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