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Search results for: Cash-flow

EUROPE-MIGRANTS/AFRICA
RTS6GEN 
November 11, 2015 
A Maltese police officer stands guard on a hill near the Mediterranean conference centre ahead of the... 
Valletta, Malta 
A Maltese police officer stands guard on a hill near the Mediterranean conference centre ahead of the... 
A Maltese police officer stands guard on a hill near the Mediterranean conference centre ahead of the Valletta Summit on Migration in Valletta, November 11, 2015. Leaders of the European Union met African counterparts on Malta on Wednesday, hoping pledges of cash and other aid can slow the flow of migrants crossing the Mediterranean from the world's poorest continent to wealthy Europe. REUTERS/Yves Herman 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX64RUB 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 21 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5MLAY 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5ML6V 
October 21, 2015 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 25 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5H31T 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 20 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5D7LV 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4WEF3 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4SIF3 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 26 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4EAZ8 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 27 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX45TWZ 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX3X1IF 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX3J0YY 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F05 
October 21, 2015 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 25 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F04 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 27 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F01 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 26 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F00 
October 21, 2015 
Amateur footballers take part in a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Amateur footballers take part in a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 30 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZY 
October 21, 2015 
Amateur footballers are seen through the goal netting during a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Amateur footballers are seen through the goal netting during a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 31 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZU 
October 21, 2015 
A newly trained female football coach speaks with children during the launch of a community grassroots... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A newly trained female football coach speaks with children during the launch of a community grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 17 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZR 
October 21, 2015 
A man displays sport merchandise on a car bonnet near the FIFA-funded training pitch in Abuja, Nigeria,... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A man displays sport merchandise on a car bonnet near the FIFA-funded training pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 29 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZQ 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 20 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZN 
October 21, 2015 
A training facility built with FIFA funding is seen at the national stadium complex in Abuja, Nigeria... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A training facility built with FIFA funding is seen at the national stadium complex in Abuja, Nigeria September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 28 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZI 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZH 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 21 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZE 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZD 
October 21, 2015 
The administrative building of the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) is seen in Bingerville,... 
BINGERVILLE, Ivory Coast 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
The administrative building of the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) is seen in Bingerville, Ivory Coast, June 10, 2015. CNTF's synthetic turf was funded in part by FIFA through its Goal Project 5. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon PICTURE 18 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZC 
October 21, 2015 
Ivory Coast's national soccer team player Eric Bahi takes a break from training at the CNTF (Football... 
BINGERVILLE, Ivory Coast 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Ivory Coast's national soccer team player Eric Bahi takes a break from training at the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) in Bingerville, Ivory Coast, June 10, 2015. CNTF's synthetic turf was funded in part by FIFA through its Goal Project 5. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon PICTURE 19 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZA 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ7 
October 21, 2015 
Footballs are seen on the edge of the training field September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Footballs are seen on the edge of the training field September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 13 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ6 
October 21, 2015 
A view of a dining a room at the football technical training centre, September 22, 2015, built with funding... 
NJERU, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A view of a dining a room at the football technical training centre, September 22, 2015, built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA) in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 11 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ5 
October 21, 2015 
A young boy plays with a ball during a training session before a soccer match at Rufaro Stadium in Harare,... 
Harare, Zimbabwe 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A young boy plays with a ball during a training session before a soccer match at Rufaro Stadium in Harare, September 26, 2015. Rufaro is Zimbabwe's oldest stadium and the only one with artificial turf. The turf was installed by FIFA as part of its development programme in 2011. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo PICTURE 9 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ3 
October 21, 2015 
Young Zimbawean boys practise their soocer skills during a training session at Rufaro Football Stadium... 
Harare, Zimbabwe 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Young Zimbawean boys practise their soocer skills during a training session at Rufaro Football Stadium in Harare, September 26, 2015. Rufaro is Zimbabwe's oldest stadium and the only one with artificial turf. The turf was installed by FIFA as part of its development programme in 2011. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Philimon BulawayoPICTURE 10 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYZ 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 26, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 1 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYY 
October 21, 2015 
Newly trained football coaches have lunch as they watch soccer on television September 22, 2015 at the... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Newly trained football coaches have lunch as they watch soccer on television September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 12 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYX 
October 21, 2015 
Children walk across a football field wearing FIFA bibs during the launch of a grassroots football training... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children walk across a football field wearing FIFA bibs during the launch of a grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with fund from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James Akena TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 14 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYO 
October 21, 2015 
Children gather on the football field during the launch of a grassroots football training session September... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children gather on the football field during the launch of a grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 16 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYM 
October 21, 2015 
Children play football during the launch of grassroots football project September 22, 2015 at the technical... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play football during the launch of grassroots football project September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 15 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYH 
October 21, 2015 
A child collects a ball beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A child collects a ball beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY PICTURE 2 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYG 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 3 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYD 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 5 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY9 
October 21, 2015 
A boy keeps goal as he plays soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy keeps goal as he plays soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 6 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY8 
October 21, 2015 
A young girl practises soccer skills beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A young girl practises soccer skills beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 4 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY7 
October 21, 2015 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While... 
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Rogan WardPICTURE 7 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY5 
October 21, 2015 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While... 
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Rogan WardPICTURE 8 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY3 
October 21, 2015 
While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY. SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL 31 IMAGES 
USA-OIL/WATER
RTSLPH 
September 11, 2015 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating, one of the largest privately held saltwater disposal... 
Alexander, UNITED STATES 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating is seen near Alexander 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating, one of the largest privately held saltwater disposal companies, is seen near Alexander, North Dakota, August 16, 2015. Some U.S. oil producers are trying to sell parts of their lucrative saltwater disposal businesses in a sign that cheap crude is already forcing cash-starved companies to sell assets so oil can keep flowing. Picture taken August 16, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
USA-OIL/WATER
RTSLP1 
September 11, 2015 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating, one of the largest privately held saltwater disposal... 
Alexander, UNITED STATES 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating is seen near Alexander, North Dakotaa 
A salt water disposal well owned by 1804 Operating, one of the largest privately held saltwater disposal companies, is seen near Alexander, North Dakota, August 16, 2015. Some U.S. oil producers are trying to sell parts of their lucrative saltwater disposal businesses in a sign that cheap crude is already forcing cash-starved companies to sell assets so oil can keep flowing. Picture taken August 16, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
INDONESIA-COAL/ C
RTX1ASAF 
April 29, 2015 
INDONESIA-COAL/ - Charts free cash flow and debt by Indonesia's top 15 coal miners by market cap from... 
Indonesia 
INDONESIA-COAL/ C 
INDONESIA-COAL/ - Charts free cash flow and debt by Indonesia's top 15 coal miners by market cap from Q2 2012. (SIN06) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q28P 
February 18, 2015 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's... 
Paris, France 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's... 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT LOGO) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q28N 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014... 
Paris, France 
PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT HEADSHOT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q284 
February 18, 2015 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's... 
Paris, France 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's... 
A Peugeot logo is seen on a car which is displayed at PSA Peugeot Citroen headquarters during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT LOGO) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q282 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares speaks during the company's... 
Paris, France 
PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares speaks during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris... 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares speaks during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q27I 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014... 
Paris, France 
PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares attends the company's 2014 results presentation in Paris 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT HEADSHOT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q26X 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014... 
Paris, France 
PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT HEADSHOT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q26O 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014... 
Paris, France 
PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q26L 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares speaks during the company's... 
Paris, France 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Tavares speaks during the company's 2014... 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares speaks during the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
PEUGEOT-RESULTS/
RTR4Q26B 
February 18, 2015 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014... 
Paris, France 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen CEO Tavares attends the company's 2014 results presentation in Paris... 
French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Chief Executive Officer Carlos Tavares attends the company's 2014 annual results presentation in Paris, February 18, 2015. PSA Peugeot Citroen took a bigger-than-expected step towards recovery on Wednesday, raising a key cash-flow objective after strong China sales and a European upturn helped the French carmaker beat expectations for 2014. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
CHINA-RATES/CORPORATES C
RTR4FSGZ 
November 27, 2014 
CHINA-RATES/CORPORATES - Graphic showing Chinese listed companies with a EBITDA to interest ratio of... 
China 
CHINA-RATES/CORPORATES C 
CHINA-RATES/CORPORATES - Graphic showing Chinese listed companies with a EBITDA to interest ratio of less than 1.5, indicating little cash flow to meet interest expenses. (SIN06) 
CHINA-APEC/CORRUPTION
RTR4D2AT 
November 06, 2014 
A man walks past a banner promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, in Beijing November... 
Beijing, China 
A man walks past a banner promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, in Beijing 
A man walks past a banner promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, in Beijing November 6, 2014. Asia Pacific countries are set to agree on an anti-corruption transparency network, a top APEC official said on Thursday, allowing law enforcement agencies to track illicit cash flows across borders as well as people suspected of graft.
REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW) 
CHINA-APEC/CORRUPTION
RTR4D29T 
November 06, 2014 
A paramilitary policeman stands guard in front of an installation promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic... 
Beijing, China 
A paramilitary policeman stands guard in front of an installation promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic... 
A paramilitary policeman stands guard in front of an installation promoting the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, in Beijing November 6, 2014. Asia Pacific countries are set to agree on an anti-corruption transparency network, a top APEC official said on Thursday, allowing law enforcement agencies to track illicit cash flows across borders as well as people suspected of graft.
REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW) 
BOUYGUES-RESULTS/
RTR442SH 
August 28, 2014 
The logo of Bouygues Telecom company is seen on the facade of a building in Paris August 28, 2014. French... 
Paris, France 
The logo of Bouygues Telecom company is seen on the facade of a building in Paris 
The logo of Bouygues Telecom company is seen on the facade of a building in Paris August 28, 2014. French conglomerate Bouygues lowered its 2014 sales forecast after a weaker than expected performance in the first half, hit by a price war in telecoms and a slump in its French road-building business. The company confirmed its goal for slightly positive free cash flow this year at Bouygues Telecom, where it is striving to lure in new customers with cheap Internet, TV and home phone bundles, and said it aimed for the unit to return to "significant" core profit growth from 2016. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS LOGO) 
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