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Search results for: Catfish

USA DROUGHT
RTR1G8ZZ
August 10, 2006
A man holds up a catfish carcass in the dried-out Moreau River on the Cheyenne River Indian reservation...
multiple cities, USA
A man holds up a catfish carcass in the dried-out Moreau River near Thunder Butte, South Dakota
A man holds up a catfish carcass in the dried-out Moreau River on the Cheyenne River Indian reservation near Thunder Butte, South Dakota August 7, 2006. A severe drought has killed crops, left ideal conditions for wildfires, forced ranchers to sell cattle and has evoked memories of the Dust Bowl disaster in the 1930s. Picture taken August 7, 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
USA DROUGHT
RTR1G8YE
August 10, 2006
A catfish carcass is seen in the dried-out Moreau River on the Cheyenne River Indian reservation near...
multiple cities, USA
A catfish carcass is seen in the dried-out Moreau River on the Cheyenne River Indian reservation near...
A catfish carcass is seen in the dried-out Moreau River on the Cheyenne River Indian reservation near Thunder Butte, South Dakota August 7, 2006. The drought has killed crops, left ideal conditions for wildfires, forced ranchers to sell cattle and has evoked memories of the Dust Bowl disaster in the 1930s. Picture taken August 7, 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
BRAZIL
RTXOA63
February 17, 2006
- PHOTO TAKEN 11FEV06 - Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught...
Altamira, Brazil
- PHOTO TAKEN 11FEV06 - Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caugh.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 11FEV06 - Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught in the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para, February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully. Picture taken February 11, 2006.
BRAZIL
RTXOA2K
February 17, 2006
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary...
Altamira, Brazil
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major trib.....
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully.
BRAZIL
RTR16BLZ
February 17, 2006
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary...
Altamira, Brazil
Brazilian da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, near the town of Altamira in the...
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
ATM07D
RTR16BKK
February 17, 2006
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught in the Xingu River, a major...
Altamira, Brazil
Brazilian da Costa holds bristle-nosed catfish he caught in Xingu River near Altamira
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught in the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para, February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully. Picture taken February 11, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL
RTR1BUWJ
February 11, 2006
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary...
Altamira, Brazil
Brazilian da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, near the town of Altamira in the...
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish at the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
ATM07D
RTR1B6W2
February 11, 2006
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught in the Xingu River, a major...
Altamira, Brazil
Brazilian da Costa holds bristle-nosed catfish he caught in Xingu River near Altamira
Brazilian Damilton Rodrigues da Costa holds a bristle-nosed catfish he caught in the Xingu River, a major tributary of the Amazon, near the town of Altamira in the Brazilian state of Para, February 11, 2006. Brazil is the world's biggest exporter of live Amazonian tropical fish. However, several Asian countries are now increasingly breeding the same Amazon species in captivity successfully. Picture taken February 11, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
SPORT FISHING
RTRYCMZ
July 30, 2005
An unidentified 2005 Bassmaster Classic fan shows off his large Ohio River catfish during day two of...
Pittsburgh, UNITED STATES
Bassmaster Classic fan shows off his catfish on the Ohio River.
An unidentified 2005 Bassmaster Classic fan shows off his large Ohio River catfish during day two of the tournament, July 30, 2005. REUTERS/Gary Cameron GAC
CAMBODIA
RTREEYZ
June 14, 2005
Cambodia Fisheries personnel release a 50-kg and 1.5-metre Mekong giant catfishes (known among Cambodians...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Cambodia Fisheries personnel mark Mekong giant catfish before releasing it back into Mekong river.
Cambodia Fisheries personnel release a 50-kg and 1.5-metre Mekong giant catfishes (known among Cambodians as "the king of fish") into the Mekong river June 14, 2005. Four giant catfish have been released back into the wild in Cambodia to try to boost numbers of the species thought to be on the verge of extinction, a wildlife conservation group said Tuesday. REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea DCS/DY
CAMBODIA
RTREEYV
June 14, 2005
Cambodia Fisheries personnel weigh a 50-kg and 1.5-meter Mekong giant catfish (known among Cambodians...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Cambodia Fisheries personnel weigh Mekong giant catfish before releasing it back into the Mekong river....
Cambodia Fisheries personnel weigh a 50-kg and 1.5-meter Mekong giant catfish (known among Cambodians as "the king of fish") before releasing it back into the Mekong river June 14, 2005. Four giant catfish have been released back into the wild in Cambodia to try to boost numbers of the species thought to be on the verge of extinction, a wildlife conservation group said Tuesday. REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea DCS/DY
BANGLADESH
RTRC866
May 17, 2005
Bangladeshi men sort catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river at Kamrangir Char in Dhaka on May 17,...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Bangladeshi men sort catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river in Dhaka.
Bangladeshi men sort catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river at Kamrangir Char in Dhaka on May 17, 2005. Bangladesh imports about 40 tonnes of sweet water fish every day from the neighbouring Myanmar to meet the huge demand, according to fish traders. Picture taken on May 17, 2005. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman RR/VP
BANGLADESH
RTRC85W
May 17, 2005
A Bangladeshi man cultivates catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river at Kamrangir Char in Dhaka on...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
A Bangladeshi man cultivates catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river in Dhaka.
A Bangladeshi man cultivates catfish in a channel of the Buriganga river at Kamrangir Char in Dhaka on May 17, 2005. Bangladesh imports about 40 tonnes of sweet water fish every day from the neighbouring Myanmar to meet the huge demand, according to fish traders. Picture taken on May 17, 2005. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman RR/VP
JAPAN
RTRB4MI
May 04, 2005
A float in the shape of a giant catfish with a stone on its head is pulled by shrine parishioners during...
Tokyo, Japan
Giant catfish float is pulled by shrine parishioners at the Kanda festival in Tokyo.
A float in the shape of a giant catfish with a stone on its head is pulled by shrine parishioners during a parade to mark the Kanda festival in Tokyo May14, 2005. Japanese legend has it that earthquakes are caused by the shaking of a giant catfish living underground and the keystone on the catfish prevents the earthquakes. The catfish float reappeared after an interval of 215 years in the festival. REUTERS/Issei Kato IK/KI
JAPAN
RTRB4I5
May 04, 2005
A float in the shape of a giant catfish with a stone in the head is pulled by shrine parishioners during...
Tokyo, Japan
Giant catfish float is pulled by shrine parishioners at the Kanda festival in Tokyo.
A float in the shape of a giant catfish with a stone in the head is pulled by shrine parishioners during a parade to mark the Kanda festival in Tokyo May14, 2005. Japanese legend has it that earthquakes are caused by the shaking of a giant catfish living underground and the keystone on the catfish prevents the earthquakes. The catfish float reappeared after an interval of 215 years in the festival. REUTERS/Issei Kato PP05050290 ODLY IK/CN
BANGLADESH
RTRA3MX
May 03, 2005
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka May 3, 2005. The truck brought...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka.
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka May 3, 2005. The truck brought the fry from Khulna district, 350 km (217.5 miles) southwest of Dhaka and will supply them to different fisheries. An increasing number of fish farmers are taking an interest in cultivating the fast-growing African species of catfish. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman RR/CN/YH
BANGLADESH
RTRA3MS
May 03, 2005
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka May 3, 2005. The truck brought...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka.
A man unloads fry of an African species of catfish from a truck in Dhaka May 3, 2005. The truck brought the fry from Khulna district, 350 km (217.5 miles) southwest of Dhaka and will supply them to different fisheries. An increasing number of fish farmers are taking an interest in cultivating the fast-growing African species of catfish. REUTERS/Rafiqur Rahman RR/CN/YH
METRO
RTR14P5
July 30, 2003
Metro Cash & Carry employees check catfish on display in a new supermaket in
Hanoi July 30, 2003. This...
Hanoi, Viet Nam - Socialist Republic of
GERMANY'S METRO CASH & CARRY OPENS ITS FIRST FACILITY IN HANOI.
Metro Cash & Carry employees check catfish on display in a new supermaket in
Hanoi July 30, 2003. This facility is Metro Cash & Carry's third in Vietnam
and the first of its kind in the capital Hanoi. The German company is the
world's fifth biggest retailer, and said on Wednesday it hopes to have eight
shops in communist Vietnam within five years. REUTERS/Kham

KHAM/PB
VIETNAM
RTRWV2
July 24, 2003
Workers unload frozen catfish fillets at an Agifish catfish shop in
Hanoi on July 24, 2003. Agifish...
Hanoi, Viet Nam - Socialist Republic of
CATFISH FILLETS UNLOADED AT EXPORT SHOP IN HANOI.
Workers unload frozen catfish fillets at an Agifish catfish shop in
Hanoi on July 24, 2003. Agifish is Vietnam's biggest catfish processor
and exporter. Vietnamese exporters warned the U.S. on Thursday that a
decision to impose steep duties of up to 64 percent on its catfish
would hurt thousands of farmers and producers in the Mekong Delta.
Vietnam is the largest foreign supplier of catfish to the U.S. market
with last year's sales totalling $55 million. Vietnamese catfish
processors have switched focus to domestic markets with products that
suit local taste to offset the loss of sales to the United States due
to the heavy duties. REUTERS/STR

CP/RCS
VIETNAM SHRIMP
RTR11KS
July 23, 2003
Vietnamese workers process shrimp at a state-owned plant in the
southern Mekong Delta-based province...
Soc Trang, Viet Nam - Socialist Republic of
VIETNAMESE WORKERS PROCESS SHRIMP FOR EXPORT.
Vietnamese workers process shrimp at a state-owned plant in the
southern Mekong Delta-based province of Soc Trang July 23, 2003. After
losing a major fight with the United States which last week slapped
steep import duties of up to 64 percent on Vietnamese catfish fillets,
exporters in the communist-ruled country are bracing on shrimp for a
possible assault on an even bigger export market. Picture taken July
23, 2003. REUTERS/KHAM

NHK/TW
THAILAND
RTRAXDP
September 23, 2002
Farm owner Sompass Meephan holds a 17-year-old giant Mekong catfish at
a private farm in Ayutthaya,...
Ayutthaya, Thailand - Kingdom of
FARM OWNER SOMPASS MEEPHAN HOLDS GIANT CATFISH IN AYUTTHAYA.
Farm owner Sompass Meephan holds a 17-year-old giant Mekong catfish at
a private farm in Ayutthaya, 80 km (50 miles) north of Bangkok on
September 23, 2002. Meephan, who has raised the fish in the farm for
almost 20 years, presented the Department of Fishery with about 100 of
the world's largest scaleless freshwater fish. The fish, which reaches
an average weight of 250 kg (550 lb), is prized for its taste, while
its oil is used for cosmetic products. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

NAW/CP
THAILAND
RTRAXDG
September 23, 2002
Fish farm owner Sompass Meephan (C), together with two Thai fishery
officials, catches a 17-year-old...
Ayutthaya, Thailand - Kingdom of
FISH FARM OWNER PRESENTS THAI FISHERY OFFICIALS WITH GIANT MEKONG
CATFISH IN AYUTTHAYA.
Fish farm owner Sompass Meephan (C), together with two Thai fishery
officials, catches a 17-year-old giant Mekong catfish in Ayutthaya, 80
km (50 miles) north of Bangkok, September 23, 2002. Meephan presented
the Thai Department of Fishery with 100 of the world's largest
scaleless freshwater fish after raising them for almost 20 years. The
fish, which reaches an average weight of 250 kg (550 lb), is prized for
its taste, while its oil is used for cosmetic products. REUTERS/Sukree
Sukplang
BRAZIL INDIAN
RTRW0D5
May 12, 2002
YAWALAPITI INDIANS HOLD UP A PIRANHA FISH CAUGHT ALONG THE TUATUARI RIVER NEAR THEIR XINGU RESERVE VILLAGE....
Alto Xingu, Brazil -
YAWALAPITI INDIANS HOLD UP A PIRANHA FISH CAUGHT ALONG THE TUATUARI RIVER NEAR THEIR XINGU RESERVE ......
YAWALAPITI INDIANS HOLD UP A PIRANHA FISH CAUGHT ALONG THE TUATUARI RIVER NEAR THEIR XINGU RESERVE VILLAGE.
Yawalapiti indian boys show off the large, jagged teeth characteristic
of a piranha fish they just hauled in from the Tuatuari river, near
their village in the Alto Xingu area, in the lower Amazon, on May 12,
2002. Each day the boys and young adults of the village take to the
rivers of the Xingu's massive reserve, fishing for a variety of species
including catfish, tucunare and piranha. Village life revolves around
subsistence fishing and beiju bread made from manioc; they do not eat
red meat. The Yawalipiti are one of 17 tribes living inside the Xingu
Indigenous Park, a reserve created in 1961 roughly the size of Belgium,
to protect the indians. REUTERS/Gregg Newton FOR RELEASE WITH FEATURE
BRAZIL-INDIAN FR05070003 ODLY
BRAZIL INDIAN
RTRW0C8
May 11, 2002
Yawalapiti indian boys jump entertain themselves with a break from
fishing by jumping into the Tuatuari...
Alto Xingu, Brazil -
YOUNG YAWALAPITI INDIANS JUMP INTO TUATUARI RIVER NEAR VILLAGE IN LOWER
AMAZON.
Yawalapiti indian boys jump entertain themselves with a break from
fishing by jumping into the Tuatuari river, near their village in the
Alto Xingu area, in the lower Amazon, on May 11, 2002. Each day the
boys and young adults take to the rivers of the Xingu's massive
reserve, fishing for a variety of species including catfish, tucunare
and piranha. The Yawalipiti are one of 17 tribes living inside the
Xingu Indigenous Park, a reserve created in 1961 roughly the size of
Belgium, to protect the indians. The tribe is now 180 strong after
being on the border of extinction some 50 years ago, when it dwindled
as low as just 12 members. REUTERS/Gregg Newton FOR RELEASE WITH
FEATURE BRAZIL-INDIAN

GN/SV
SPACE SHUTTLE
RTRDZ40
February 06, 2001
A dead catfish sits in the mud near launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center as workers ready the space...
Cape Canaveral, USA
DRY CONDITIONS AT SPACE SHUTTLE LAUNCH SITE.
A dead catfish sits in the mud near launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center as workers ready the space shuttle Atlantis for Mission STS-98 to the International Space Station February 6, 2001. The craft is expected to carry five astronauts on a mission to transfer the Destiny science module to the space station.

JLS/JP
BANGLADESH
RTR5Z4H
July 05, 2000
A Bangladeshi man feeds hundreds of catfish he produces in his small firm on the outskirt of Dhaka July...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
FISH BREEDER FEEDS HIS CATFISH IN DHAKA.
A Bangladeshi man feeds hundreds of catfish he produces in his small firm on the outskirt of Dhaka July 5. He breeds an African species of catfish which grows quickly into giant size, weighing up to 10 kg each.

AA/TAN
PHILIPPINES FISHING
RTRQ585
June 20, 1999
Residents in the Philippine capital, Manila aim their rifles at the murky waters of the Pasig river in...
Manila, Philippines
FILIPINO RESIDENTS AIM THEIR AIR RIFLES AT FISH IN A RIVER.
Residents in the Philippine capital, Manila aim their rifles at the murky waters of the Pasig river in their efforts to catch fish for food June 20. Sharp hooks are fired from the rifles which spear through the mudfish and catfish that swim in the river.

EDC/JIR/AA
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