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Search results for: Cell-animation

BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES-JAGUAR
RTX7XCI0
September 23, 2020
A caregiver shows burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a fire...
CORUMBA DE GOIAS, Brazil
A caregiver shows burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a fire...
A caregiver shows burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a fire in Pantanal, as the animal undergoes a stem cell treatment, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. Picture taken September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES-JAGUAR
RTX7XCFE
September 23, 2020
A caregiver cleans burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a...
CORUMBA DE GOIAS, Brazil
A caregiver cleans burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a...
A caregiver cleans burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a fire in Pantanal, as the animal undergoes a stem cell treatment, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. Picture taken September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-VACCINE
RTS38VO5
May 25, 2020
A researcher works inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department of Medical Science Ministry...
Bangkok, Thailand
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine test in Thailand
A researcher works inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department of Medical Science Ministry of Public Health during a study on the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) growth in animal cells in Bangkok, Thailand, May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-VACCINE
RTS38VO0
May 25, 2020
Vero's cells are seen inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department of Medical Science Ministry...
Bangkok, Thailand
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine test in Thailand
Vero's cells are seen inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department of Medical Science Ministry of Public Health during a study on the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) growth in animal cells in Bangkok, Thailand, May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-VACCINE
RTS38VL8
May 25, 2020
Vero's cells are seen through a microscope inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department...
Bangkok, Thailand
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine test in Thailand
Vero's cells are seen through a microscope inside a laboratory of the Biological Institute Department of Medical Science Ministry of Public Health during a study on the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) growth in animal cells in Bangkok, Thailand, May 25, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
CHINA-PETCLONING/
RTX6IWHT
December 17, 2018
A screen displays the microscopic image of an attempt to inseminate a dog egg at a lab of the biotech...
Beijing, China
Screen displays the microscopic image of an attempt to inseminate a dog egg at a lab of the biotech company...
A screen displays the microscopic image of an attempt to inseminate a dog egg at a lab of the biotech company Sinogene that specialises in dog cloning in Beijing, China June 15, 2018. Picture taken June 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
FRANCE-ENERGY/
RTX470X2
January 08, 2018
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane...
ALLONNES, France
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-ENERGY/
RTX470H2
January 08, 2018
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane...
ALLONNES, France
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
FRANCE-ENERGY/
RTX470GW
January 08, 2018
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane...
ALLONNES, France
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans
Sheep are herded at a photovoltaic power plant in Allonnes near Le Mans, France January 8, 2018. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
USA-ANIMALS/
RTX3E9KH
September 01, 2017
A Pere David's deer rests next to a watering hole and a solar panel in Thompson, Texas on August 30,...
THOMPSON, UNITED STATES
A Pere David's deer lies next to a water hole and a solar panel in Thompson, Texas
A Pere David's deer rests next to a watering hole and a solar panel in Thompson, Texas on August 30, 2017. Picture taken on August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167Y4
May 11, 2017
Female inmates walk from their holding cell to the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
Female inmates walk from their holding cell to the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that has become a shelter for abused and neglected animals seized in Maricopa County Sheriff's Office investigations, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167XT
May 11, 2017
Inmate Kristina Hazelett, 35, strokes a dog in a cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
Inmate Kristina Hazelett, 35, strokes a dog in a cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that has become a shelter for abused and neglected animals seized in Maricopa County Sheriff's Office investigations, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167XR
May 11, 2017
An inmate walks a dog back into its cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
An inmate walks a dog back into its cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that has become a shelter for abused and neglected animals seized in Maricopa County Sheriff's Office investigations, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167XO
May 11, 2017
Inmate Kristina Hazelett, 35, plays with a dog in a cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
Inmate Kristina Hazelett, 35, plays with a dog in a cell at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that has become a shelter for abused and neglected animals seized in Maricopa County Sheriff's Office investigations, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167XI
May 11, 2017
Two puppies look out through a cell door at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
Two puppies look out through a cell door at the MCSO Animal Safe Haven (MASH) Unit in a former jail that has become a shelter for abused and neglected animals seized in Maricopa County Sheriff's Office investigations, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-DOGS/JAIL
RTS167WR
May 11, 2017
Kristina Hazelett had cats, birds and hamsters while growing up but she never knew much about dogs until...
Phoenix, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Prisoners care for abused animals at former jail
Kristina Hazelett had cats, birds and hamsters while growing up but she never knew much about dogs until she started serving a jail sentence for drug possession. The 35-year-old inmate is part of a team of women prisoners in Phoenix, Arizona who work with the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Animal Safety Unit (MASH) in a program that comforts and trains mistreated and neglected animals rescued from deplorable conditions. Six days a week the women are transported to the animal shelter in a former men's jail where rows of cells, some adorned with dog portraits and animal murals, have been renamed Bow Wow Way, Purr Lane, 2nd Chance and Ruff Road. "Along the way, we provide the rehabilitation for not just the animals but for the inmates as well," William Sibole, a detention officer with the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office, told Reuters. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "DOGS NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching text USA-DOGS/JAIL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SPAIN-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX2A32Z
April 15, 2016
A white stork brings branches to its nest situated on a cell phone tower near Don Benito, Spain, April...
DON BENITO, Spain
A white stork brings branches to its nest situated on a cell phone tower near Don Benito
A white stork brings branches to its nest situated on a cell phone tower near Don Benito, Spain, April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Paul Hanna TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
KENYA-ANIMALS/
RTR4APBK
October 19, 2014
A visitor photographs orphaned baby elephants with a cell phone at the David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage...
Nairobi, Kenya
A visitor photographs orphaned baby elephants with a cell phone at the David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage...
A visitor photographs orphaned baby elephants with a cell phone at the David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage within the Nairobi National Park, near Kenya's capital Nairobi October 12, 2014. The orphanage under the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is operated by Daphne Sheldrick, wife of late famous naturalist David William Sheldrick. The orphaned elephants raised by the trust will be returned to join the undomesticated elephant population in Tsavo National Park, where David was the founder warden from 1948 to 1976, when they mature, usually between eight to 10 years old. Picture taken on October 12, 2014. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (KENYA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
SCOTLAND-INDEPENDENCE/POLLS
RTR3Z6TW
July 18, 2014
The taxidermied remains of Dolly the Sheep, the first cloned mammal created from an adult cell, is displayed...
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
The taxidermied remains of Dolly the Sheep, the first cloned mammal created from an adult cell, is displayed...
The taxidermied remains of Dolly the Sheep, the first cloned mammal created from an adult cell, is displayed at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh, Scotland April 30, 2014. Scottish separatists are closing the gap on their unionist rivals as a September independence referendum draws nearer, according to a poll. But pollster TNS said it would still be a "major task" for them to draw level in time. In a poll of 995 adults, TNS found that support for the pro-independence campaign had grown by two points to 32 percent compared with last month, while the campaign to reject independence had slipped back a point to 41 percent. In the run-up to the vote, Reuters photographer Suzanne Plunkett took a series of close-up pictures of food, drink and various objects typically associated with Scotland. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: ANIMALS POLITICS SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 28 FOR PACKAGE 'DETAILS OF SCOTLAND'
TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'PLUNKETT DETAIL'
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFXE
April 01, 2014
Shadows of Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori...
Tokyo, Japan
Shadows of Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori and...
Shadows of Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (L) and a RIKEN executive member are cast on the wall behind Noyori during a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFW3
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori attends a...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori attends a news...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori attends a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFVX
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (C) bows...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori bows to apologise...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (C) bows to apologise with other RIKEN executives during a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFVO
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (L) speaks...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori speaks during a...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (L) speaks during a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFVL
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (C) arrives...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori arrives for a news...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori (C) arrives with other RIKEN executives to a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFVH
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori scratches...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori scratches his head...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori scratches his head during a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
HEALTH-STEMCELLS/
RTR3JFVB
April 01, 2014
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori attends a...
Tokyo, Japan
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Noyori attends a news...
Nobel Prize-winning chemist and President of Japanese research institute RIKEN Ryoji Noyori attends a news conference in Tokyo April 1, 2014. Two papers published in the journal Nature in January detailed a simple way to reprogramme mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue, offering hope for a simpler way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs in humans. But other scientists have been unable to replicate the research's results since then and there have been indications of problems with its data and images. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY)
UKRAINE-CRISIS/
RTR3IK1W
March 25, 2014
A bird sits on a solar panel at a solar power station on the outskirts of Simferopol, March 25, 2014....
Simferopol, Ukraine
A bird sits on a solar panel at a solar power station on the outskirts of Simferopol
A bird sits on a solar panel at a solar power station on the outskirts of Simferopol, March 25, 2014. Russia and the West sought to draw a provisional line under the Ukraine crisis on Tuesday after major industrialised nations warned Moscow of tougher economic sanctions if it goes beyond the seizure of Crimea. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ANIMALS)
THAILAND-SOLAR/
RTX1556V
November 08, 2013
Birds sit on panels at a farm owned by SPCG, Thailand's largest solar farm producer, in Korat, Nakorn...
Korat, Thailand
Birds sit on panels at a farm owned by SPCG in Korat
Birds sit on panels at a farm owned by SPCG, Thailand's largest solar farm producer, in Korat, Nakorn Ratchasima province October 3, 2013. Riding on generous government incentives, Thailand's energy firms are deepening a push into solar power to bolster their profits over the next few years and perk up lacklustre shares. Picture taken October 3, 2013. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha (THAILAND - Tags: ENERGY BUSINESS ANIMALS)
LITHIUM/
RTXY9E9
November 07, 2013
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern...
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY ANIMALS)

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SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B0Q
August 05, 2013
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger, in west...
London, United Kingdom
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger in west...
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger, in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B07
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B01
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZY
August 05, 2013
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London...
London, United Kingdom
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London...
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZC
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ6
August 05, 2013
A photographer shoots in a television studio with a live screen view behind as the world's first lab-grown...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
A photographer shoots in a television studio with a live screen view behind as the world's first lab-grown beef burger is cooked during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ5
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ1
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ0
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYY
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYX
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYW
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYV
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYS
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SAFRICA/
RTX114DL
June 28, 2013
A cattle herder speaks on a cell phone while moving his animals across the Qunu River near former South...
Qunu, South Africa
A cattle herder speaks on a cell phone while moving his animals across the Qunu River near former South...
A cattle herder speaks on a cell phone while moving his animals across the Qunu River near former South African President Nelson Mandela's house in Qunu, June 28, 2013. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS POLITICS)
LITHIUM/
RTXY9E6
April 05, 2013
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium...
Salta, Argentina
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL ANIMALS ENERGY)

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FRANCE/
RTR3C7X9
January 08, 2013
Prisoners are seen at the windows of their cells inside Les Baumettes prison in Marseille, January 8,...
Marseille, France
Prisoners are seen at the windows of their cells inside Les Baumettes prison in Marseille
Prisoners are seen at the windows of their cells inside Les Baumettes prison in Marseille, January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW) ATTENTION EDITORS FRENCH REQUIRES THAT FACES OF PRISONERS ARE MASKED IN PUBLICATIONS WITHIN FRANCE
BOLIVIA/
RTX110Y7
November 07, 2012
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the...
La Paz, Bolivia
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENERGY) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
PERU/
RTR39697
October 15, 2012
An inmate sells fresh chicken at market in an alley of the Lurigancho prison in Lima September 13, 2012....
Lima, Peru
An inmate sells fresh chicken at market in an alley of the Lurigancho prison in Lima
An inmate sells fresh chicken at market in an alley of the Lurigancho prison in Lima September 13, 2012. Although Lurigancho prison is one of the most overcrowded, violent, and unruly jails in Latin America, its more than 8,500 prisoners live with so much freedom inside the walled perimeter that they have created their own city which mimics the urban society on the outside. Picture taken September 13, 2012. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR3964M
October 15, 2012
A dog runs on the roof of a wing at the Lurigancho prison in Lima, July 19, 2012. Although Lurigancho...
Lima, Peru
A dog runs on the roof of a wing at the Lurigancho prison in Lima
A dog runs on the roof of a wing at the Lurigancho prison in Lima, July 19, 2012. Although Lurigancho prison is one of the most overcrowded, violent, and unruly jails in Latin America, its more than 8,500 prisoners live with so much freedom inside the walled perimeter that they have created their own city which mimics the urban society on the outside. Picture taken July 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR353NJ
July 19, 2012
Prisoners with a dog are seen behind a fence at Lurigancho prison, South America's biggest jail with...
Lima, Peru
Prisoners with a dog are seen behind a fence at Lurigancho prison in Lima
Prisoners with a dog are seen behind a fence at Lurigancho prison, South America's biggest jail with more than 9,000 inmates, in Lima, July 19, 2012. The director of Lurigancho prison, Police Colonel Thomas Durand Garay, inaugurated ceramic and textile workshops to promote the integration of prisoners into society, according to their press release. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
SAFRICA-PHONES/
RTR34NBS
July 06, 2012
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was...
Cape Town, South Africa
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was...
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was caught using the device while driving, in Cape Town, July 5, 2012. Phoning or texting while driving in the South African tourist capital of Cape Town could cost you your cell phone under a new by-law allowing police to confiscate handsets for 24 hours. In their first peak-hour blitz since the law came into effect this week, police in unmarked "ghost squad" vehicles seized 16 phones from loquacious and quick-fingered motorists. Picture taken July 5, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS CRIME LAW ANIMALS)
SAFRICA-PHONES/
RTR34NBI
July 06, 2012
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was...
Cape Town, South Africa
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was...
A dog peers out of a car window as police fine and confiscate the mobile phone of the driver, who was caught using the device while driving, in Cape Town, July 5, 2012. Phoning or texting while driving in the South African tourist capital of Cape Town could cost you your cell phone under a new by-law allowing police to confiscate handsets for 24 hours. In their first peak-hour blitz since the law came into effect this week, police in unmarked "ghost squad" vehicles seized 16 phones from loquacious and quick-fingered motorists. Picture taken July 5, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS CRIME LAW ANIMALS)
USA/
RTR32UT3
May 31, 2012
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Meb Keflezighi (not pictured) trains for the London 2012...
MAMMOTH LAKES, UNITED STATES
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Keflezighi trains for the London 2012 Olympics in Mammoth...
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Meb Keflezighi (not pictured) trains for the London 2012 Olympics in Mammoth Lakes, California May 29, 2012. Olympic silver medalist Keflezighi, 37, is the oldest American ever to qualify for the Olympic marathon. He trains at an altitude of around 9,000 feet in Mammoth to increase his red blood cells and boost his endurance. Picture taken May 29, 2012. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY OLYMPICS ANIMALS)
USA/
RTR32USM
May 31, 2012
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Meb Keflezighi (not pictured) trains for the London 2012...
MAMMOTH LAKES, UNITED STATES
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Keflezighi trains for the London 2012 Olympics in Mammoth...
A bald eagle takes off as U.S. marathon runner Meb Keflezighi (not pictured) trains for the London 2012 Olympics in Mammoth Lakes, California May 29, 2012. Olympic silver medalist Keflezighi, 37, is the oldest American ever to qualify for the Olympic marathon. He trains at around 9,000 feet in Mammoth to increase his red blood cells and boost his endurance. Picture taken May 29, 2012. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY OLYMPICS ANIMALS)
SAFRICA-RHINO/
RTR31LE8
May 04, 2012
A policeman watches as Manh Thuong Tran (L), a Vietnamese national, is led to the cells after appearing...
Johannesburg, South Africa
A policeman watches as Tran, a Vietnamese national, is led to the cells after appearing at the Kempton...
A policeman watches as Manh Thuong Tran (L), a Vietnamese national, is led to the cells after appearing at the Kempton Park high court in Johannesburg May 4, 2012. The case was adjourned till next week. Tran, who is charged with poaching, was caught in possession of a rhino horn while transiting in Johannesburg on a flight from Mozambique, according to the prosecutor. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS CRIME LAW)
KOREA/
RTR2TZGE
October 17, 2011
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm...
PYEONGTAEK, South Korea
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang and his team is pictured on a farm in Pyeongtaek...
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, October 17, 2011. Hwang on Monday donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. Hwang was at the heart of a research fraud case in 2005, where a team he led was found by review boards to have manipulated key data in its studies on cloning stem cells. South Korea, considered then a global leader in human embryonic stem cell research, all but put stem cell research into deep freeze as a result of the scandal. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: ANIMALS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
KOREA-STEMCELL/
RTR2SQJ8
October 17, 2011
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk (L) attends a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his...
PYEONGTAEK, South Korea
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang attends a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his team at a wildlife...
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk (L) attends a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his team at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, October 17, 2011. Hwang on Monday donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. Hwang was at the heart of a research fraud case in 2005, where a team he led was found by review boards to have manipulated key data in its studies on cloning stem cells. South Korea, considered then a global leader in human embryonic stem cell research, all but put stem cell research into deep freeze as a result of the scandal. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS HEADSHOT)
KOREA-STEMCELL/
RTR2SQJ7
October 17, 2011
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk claps during a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his...
PYEONGTAEK, South Korea
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang claps during a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his team at...
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk claps during a ceremony donating coyotes cloned by his team at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, October 17, 2011. Hwang on Monday donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. Hwang was at the heart of a research fraud case in 2005, where a team he led was found by review boards to have manipulated key data in its studies on cloning stem cells. South Korea, considered then a global leader in human embryonic stem cell research, all but put stem cell research into deep freeze as a result of the scandal. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS HEADSHOT)
KOREA-STEMCELL/
RTR2SQJ6
October 17, 2011
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm...
PYEONGTAEK, South Korea
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife...
A coyote cloned by South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk and his team is pictured on a farm at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, October 17, 2011. Hwang on Monday donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. Hwang was at the heart of a research fraud case in 2005, where a team he led was found by review boards to have manipulated key data in its studies on cloning stem cells. South Korea, considered then a global leader in human embryonic stem cell research, all but put stem cell research into deep freeze as a result of the scandal. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS) FOR BEST QUALITY: ALSO SEE GF2E7BD05U901
KOREA-STEMCELL/
RTR2SQJ4
October 17, 2011
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk smiles as he greets guests during a donation ceremony...
PYEONGTAEK, South Korea
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang smiles as he greets guests during a donation ceremony of cloned...
South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk smiles as he greets guests during a donation ceremony of cloned coyotes by his team at a wildlife protection centre in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, October 17, 2011. Hwang on Monday donated eight coyotes that he and his research team at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation cloned to help the endangered species, to the Gyeonggi provincial government, local media reported. Hwang was at the heart of a research fraud case in 2005, where a team he led was found by review boards to have manipulated key data in its studies on cloning stem cells. South Korea, considered then a global leader in human embryonic stem cell research, all but put stem cell research into deep freeze as a result of the scandal. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS HEADSHOT)
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