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Search results for: Central-Park

USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKWD
January 17, 2013
An activist speaks during a rally for the Central Park Five in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage...
New York, UNITED STATES
An activist speaks during a rally for the Central Park Five in New York
An activist speaks during a rally for the Central Park Five in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKWB
January 17, 2013
Desmond Cadogan holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York January...
New York, UNITED STATES
A man holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York
Desmond Cadogan holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKWA
January 17, 2013
Desmond Cadogan holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York January...
New York, UNITED STATES
A man holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York
Desmond Cadogan holds up a sign during a rally in support of the Central Park Five in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKW7
January 17, 2013
Members of the Central Park Five Raymond Santana (L), Kevin Richardson (2nd L) and Yusef Salaam (R) along...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members of the Central Park Five take part in a rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in...
Members of the Central Park Five Raymond Santana (L), Kevin Richardson (2nd L) and Yusef Salaam (R) along with Angela Black, Richardson's sister, take part in a rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys including Santana, Richardson and Salaam confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKW5
January 17, 2013
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five march during a rally to support their lawsuit against...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five march during a rally to support their lawsuit against...
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five march during a rally to support their lawsuit against the city in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKW1
January 17, 2013
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five chant during rally in support of their lawsuit against...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five chant during rally in support of their lawsuit against...
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five chant during rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKVZ
January 17, 2013
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in...
Members and supporters of the Central Park Five rally in support of their lawsuit against the city in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKVU
January 17, 2013
Members of the Central Park Five Raymond Santana (L), Kevin Richardson (2nd L) and Yusef Salaam (R) along...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members of the Central Park Five take part in a rally in their support in New York
Members of the Central Park Five Raymond Santana (L), Kevin Richardson (2nd L) and Yusef Salaam (R) along with Angela Black, Richardson's sister, take part in a rally in their support in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys including Santana, Richardson and Salaam confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
USA-CRIME/CENTRALPARK
RTR3CKVR
January 17, 2013
Kevin Richardson, a member of the Central Park Five, takes part in a rally to support their lawsuit against...
New York, UNITED STATES
Kevin Richardson, a member of the Central Park Five, takes part in a rally to support their lawsuit against...
Kevin Richardson, a member of the Central Park Five, takes part in a rally to support their lawsuit against the City in New York January 17, 2013. Five teenage boys including Richardson confessed to raping a woman in Central Park on April 19, 1989, after hours of interrogation by New York City police. Whether those confessions, which helped send them to prison before their convictions were overturned in 2002, were coerced by investigators is at the heart of an unresolved $250 million lawsuit that has served as an ugly reminder of questions about race and the justice system that have haunted the so-called "Central Park Jogger" case for almost 24 years. A hearing for the case was held on January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
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