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Search results for: Chemical-pollutant

Pictures Report
Pictures Report
These Houston residents dream of moving to where the air is clear
21 PICTURES
Wider Image
Wider Image
These Houston residents dream of moving to where the air is clear
21 PICTURES
USA-POLLUTION/HOUSTON
RTS2X03R
January 03, 2020
A mariachi band plays for plant workers who just finished their shift at the LyondellBasell chemicals...
Pasadena, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: These Houston residents dream of moving to where the air is clear
A mariachi band plays for plant workers who just finished their shift at the LyondellBasell chemicals and refining plant in Pasadena, Texas, U.S., August 9, 2018. The plant workers have made it a tradition to bring in the mariachi band to this parking lot near their work, where they unwind with beers on payday. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "POLLUTION HOUSTON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-POLLUTION/HOUSTON
RTS2X03P
January 03, 2020
Chemical plants and refineries near the Houston Ship Channel are seen next to the Manchester neighborhood...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: These Houston residents dream of moving to where the air is clear
Chemical plants and refineries near the Houston Ship Channel are seen next to the Manchester neighborhood in the industrial east end of Houston, Texas, U.S., August 9, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "POLLUTION HOUSTON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOBN
January 22, 2019
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOBM
January 22, 2019
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOBD
January 22, 2019
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOBA
January 22, 2019
A worker operates drones as they spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A worker operates drones as they spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOB9
January 22, 2019
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOB8
January 22, 2019
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
Drones fly and spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOB7
January 22, 2019
A worker operates drones as they spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A worker operates drones as they spray chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOB0
January 22, 2019
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOAZ
January 22, 2019
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2BOAW
January 22, 2019
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
A drone flies and sprays chemicals during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2AP5I
January 15, 2019
Workers load chemicals to an aircraft before an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand,...
Rayong, Thailand
Workers load chemicals to an aircraft before an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok
Workers load chemicals to an aircraft before an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 15, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-POLLUTION/
RTS2AP5H
January 15, 2019
Workers pour chemicals as an aircraft flies over outskirt of Bangkok in a bid to seed clouds during an...
Rayong, Thailand
Workers pour chemicals as an aircraft flies over outskirt of Bangkok in a bid to seed clouds during an...
Workers pour chemicals as an aircraft flies over outskirt of Bangkok in a bid to seed clouds during an operation to reduce air pollution in Bangkok, Thailand, January 15, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX3N3CO
December 08, 2017
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
YIXING, China
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical manufacturing industry, in his locality outside one of the factories that he says breaks environmental protection rules, in Yixing city, Jiangsu province, China November 14, 2017. Picture taken November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Shepherd
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX3MW15
December 08, 2017
Pensioner Gu (L) and environmental activist Wu Lihong hold up pictures taken by Gu showing pollution...
CHANGXING, China
Pensioner Gu (L) and environmental activist Wu Lihong hold up pictures taken by Mr Gu showing pollution...
Pensioner Gu (L) and environmental activist Wu Lihong hold up pictures taken by Gu showing pollution of chemical manufacturing in his local neighborhood in Changxing county, a short distance from Dingshu town, Zhejiang province, China November 14, 2017. Picture taken November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Shepherd
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX3MW12
December 08, 2017
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
YIXING, China
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical manufacturing industry, in his locality outside one of the factories that he says breaks environmental protection rules, in Yixing city, Zhejiang province, China November 14, 2017. Picture taken November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Shepherd
JAPAN-MINAMATA/VICTIMS
RTX3H7YG
September 20, 2017
Shinobu Sakamoto was just 15 when she left her home in the southern Japanese fishing village of Minamata...
Minamata, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's mercury-poison victims fight to be heard
Shinobu Sakamoto was just 15 when she left her home in the southern Japanese fishing village of Minamata to go to Stockholm and tell the world of the horrors of mercury poisoning. Forty-five years on, she is travelling again, this time to Geneva, to attend from Sunday a gathering of signatories to the first global pact to rein in mercury pollution. Sakamoto is one of a shrinking group of survivors from a 1950s industrial disaster in which tens of thousands of people were poisoned after waste water from a chemical plant seeped into the Minamata bay. The waste contained a toxic organic compound, methylmercury, which can cause severe damage to the brain and nervous system, leading to a condition called Minamata disease. It gives its name to the U.N.-backed treaty that took effect last month. Symptoms worsen with age, leaving some victims grappling with the question of who will care for them after the death of siblings and parents, while others face legal disputes. "If I don't say something, no one will know about Minamata disease," said Sakamoto, who is one of the few born with the disease who is still able to talk. "There are still so many problems, and I want people to know." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "MINAMATA VICTIMS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: JAPAN-MINAMATA/VICTIMS
CHINA-SILKROAD/LAOS
RTS16AEK
May 12, 2017
Kongkaew Vonusak smiles when he recalls the arrival of Chinese investors in his tranquil village in northern...
BOKEO, Laos
The Wider Image: Cash and chemicals: banana boom a blessing and a curse
Kongkaew Vonusak smiles when he recalls the arrival of Chinese investors in his tranquil village in northern Laos inÊ2014. With them came easy money, he said. The Chinese offered villagers up toÊ$720Êper hectare to rent their land, much of it fallow for years, said Kongkaew, 59, the village chief. They wanted to grow bananas on it. In impoverished Laos, the offer was generous. "They told us the price and asked us if we were happy. We said okay." Elsewhere, riverside land with good access roads fetched at least double that sum. Three years later, the Chinese-driven banana boom has left few locals untouched, but not everyone is smiling. Experts say the Chinese have brought jobs and higher wages to northern Laos, but have also drenched plantations with pesticides and other chemicals. Last year, the Lao government banned the opening of new banana plantations after a state-backed institute reported that the intensive use of chemicals had sickened workers and polluted water sources. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "SILVA BANANA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching text CHINA-SILKROAD/LAOS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-SILKROAD/LAOS
RTS16A39
May 12, 2017
Kongkaew Vonusak smiles when he recalls the arrival of Chinese investors in his tranquil village in northern...
BOKEO, Laos
The Wider Image: Cash and chemicals: banana boom a blessing and a curse
Kongkaew Vonusak smiles when he recalls the arrival of Chinese investors in his tranquil village in northern Laos in 2014. With them came easy money, he said. The Chinese offered villagers up to $720 per hectare to rent their land, much of it fallow for years, said Kongkaew, 59, the village chief. They wanted to grow bananas on it. In impoverished Laos, the offer was generous. "They told us the price and asked us if we were happy. We said okay." Elsewhere, riverside land with good access roads fetched at least double that sum. Three years later, the Chinese-driven banana boom has left few locals untouched, but not everyone is smiling. Experts say the Chinese have brought jobs and higher wages to northern Laos, but have also drenched plantations with pesticides and other chemicals. Last year, the Lao government banned the opening of new banana plantations after a state-backed institute reported that the intensive use of chemicals had sickened workers and polluted water sources. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "SILVA BANANA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching text CHINA-SILKROAD/LAOS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TURKEY-REFERENDUM/VOTERS
RTX3596B
April 12, 2017
Fisherman Cengiz Topcu, 57, who says he will vote 'No' in the referendum, poses in his boat in Rize on...
Rize, Turkey
The Wider Image: Turkey's referendum: myriad views, only two options
Fisherman Cengiz Topcu, 57, who says he will vote 'No' in the referendum, poses in his boat in Rize on the Black Sea coast, Turkey, April 5, 2017. "I am a patriot. In the past Erdogan was a good man but recently he has changed in a bad way. I want a democracy, not the rule of one man. Systems ruled by one person lead to military coups," Topcu said. He thought that Turkey's biggest problems are unemployment and terror. He is also concerned about the environment, "In the past, there were lots fish in the Black Sea, but now it is polluted. The chemicals from the factories along the rivers pollute the rivers and these rivers carry the poison to the sea. There are no more fish around." REUTERS/Umit Bektas SEARCH "VOXPOPS UMIT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY??
CHINA-PROPRTY/TIANJIN
RTX1TYPR
October 30, 2015
A man who does not want to be identified (L) walks towards a construction worker taking a break as he...
Tianjin, China
A man who does not want to be identified walks towards a construction worker taking a break as he visits...
A man who does not want to be identified (L) walks towards a construction worker taking a break as he visits his new apartment undergoing a renovation at the Binhai new district in Tianjin, China, October 18, 2015. The man's former apartment was damaged by August's deadly blasts and he recently purchased the six-year old apartment located about 12 km (7.4 miles) away from the disaster area. He said he does not want to live in his old apartment because he worries about pollutants released from the blasts. With prices of new homes rising by about 10 percent since the chemical blasts to meet an increase in demand, finding new homes outside the disaster area for most of those affected is a costly - and frustrating - process. Picture taken October 18, 2015. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
CHINA-PROPRTY/TIANJIN
RTX1TYOR
October 30, 2015
A man who does not want to be identified looks at a construction site of new apartment buildings as he...
Tianjin, China
A man who does not want to be identified looks at a construction site of new apartment buildings as he...
A man who does not want to be identified looks at a construction site of new apartment buildings as he stands in his recently purchased apartment at the Binhai new district in Tianjin, China, October 18, 2015. The man's former apartment was damaged by August's deadly blasts and he recently purchased the six-year old apartment located about 12 km (7.4 miles) away from the disaster area. He said he does not want to live in his old apartment because he worries about pollutants released from the blasts. With prices of new homes rising by about 10 percent since the chemical blasts to meet an increase in demand, finding new homes outside the disaster area for most of those affected is a costly - and frustrating - process. Picture taken October 18, 2015. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
CHINA-BLAST/
RTX1OM1U
August 18, 2015
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station...
Tianjin, China
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station...
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station to check for environmental pollution located within a 3-km (2-mile) exclusion zone from the explosion site in Binhai new district in Tianjin, China, August 18, 2015. The explosions late last Wednesday in Tianjin, the world's 10th-busiest port in China's industrial northeast, forced the evacuation of thousands of people after toxic chemicals were detected in the air. More than 700 people were injured and another 70, mostly fire fighters, are still missing. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
CHINA-BLAST/
RTX1OM0V
August 18, 2015
Engineers of Tianjin environmental monitoring center use a device to check the level of hydrogen cyanide...
Tianjin, China
Engineers of Tianjin environmental monitoring center use a device to check the level of hydrogen cyanide...
Engineers of Tianjin environmental monitoring center use a device to check the level of hydrogen cyanide present in the air at a monitoring station observing environmental pollution located within a 3-km (2-mile) exclusion zone from last week's explosion site in Binhai new district in Tianjin, China, August 18, 2015. The explosions late last Wednesday in Tianjin, the world's 10th-busiest port in China's industrial northeast, forced the evacuation of thousands of people after toxic chemicals were detected in the air. More than 700 people were injured and another 70, mostly fire fighters, are still missing. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Wider Image
Wider Image
World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump - 03 Jul 2015
18 PICTURES
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IURF
July 03, 2015
A new factory which is to be used for recycling waste is under construction at a government managed area...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A new factory which is to be used for recycling waste is under construction at a government managed area in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 17 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IURD
July 03, 2015
A man rides a motorcycle through the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10,...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A man rides a motorcycle through the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 18 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQZ
July 03, 2015
A worker recycles CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A worker recycles CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 13 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQW
July 03, 2015
A polluted river flows past a workshop that is used for recycling electronic waste in the township of...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A polluted river flows past a workshop that is used for recycling electronic waste in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 16 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQV
July 03, 2015
Old cellular phone components are discarded inside a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Old cellular phone components are discarded inside a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 12 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQS
July 03, 2015
Plastic components of electronic waste are packed on a roadside in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Plastic components of electronic waste are packed on a roadside in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 14 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQQ
July 03, 2015
CD players for recycling are seen at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
CD players for recycling are seen at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 11 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQO
July 03, 2015
Motor tricycles carrying electronic waste are transported to one of the small workshops for recycling...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Motor tricycles carrying electronic waste are transported to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 15 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQN
July 03, 2015
Workers recycle CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Workers recycle CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQB
July 03, 2015
A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 7 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ7
July 03, 2015
A toy tricycle is seen on circuit boards at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A toy tricycle is seen on circuit boards at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ2
July 03, 2015
Circuit boards lie inside a home in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Circuit boards lie inside a home in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 8 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ1
July 03, 2015
A polluted river flows past a workshop used for processsing plastic components of electronic waste at...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A polluted river flows past a workshop used for processsing plastic components of electronic waste at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ0
July 03, 2015
A motor tricycle transports electronic waste to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A motor tricycle transports electronic waste to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPY
July 03, 2015
Workers illegally distribute old computers and printers to others for future recycling outside the government...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Workers illegally distribute old computers and printers to others for future recycling outside the government designated recycling centre, at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPR
July 03, 2015
Buffalos are seen adjacent to workshops recycling plastic components from electronic waste at the township...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Buffalos are seen adjacent to workshops recycling plastic components from electronic waste at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015.The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 3 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPP
July 03, 2015
Metal cases are piled up on the outskirts of the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Metal cases are piled up on the outskirts of the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 2 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPO
July 03, 2015
A recycling electronic waste factory is seen beside a field in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A recycling electronic waste factory is seen beside a field in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 1 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPD
July 03, 2015
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY

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GUIYU, China
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY

SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Society
Society
Heshan - A Poisonous Legacy - 23 June 2014
27 PICTURES
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZX
June 23, 2014
Damaged cowpea seedlings grow in a field at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province,...
SHIMEN, China
Damaged cowpea seedlings grow in a field at Heshan village, in Shimen county
Damaged cowpea seedlings grow in a field at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 4, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 26 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZT
June 23, 2014
A scarecrow stands in a field at Heshan village in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June...
SHIMEN, China
A scarecrow stands in a field at Heshan village in Shimen county
A scarecrow stands in a field at Heshan village in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 27 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZQ
June 23, 2014
A woman walks past a tomb at Heshan village in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3,...
SHIMEN, China
A woman walks past a tomb at Heshan village in Shimen county
A woman walks past a tomb at Heshan village in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 25 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZM
June 23, 2014
Qin Wenji, 82, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county,...
SHIMEN, China
Qin Wenji, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county...
Qin Wenji, 82, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 23 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZK
June 23, 2014
Xiong Demin, 71, who suffers from lung cancer, has breakfast with his 65-year-old wife Wen Jin'e, who...
SHIMEN, China
Xiong Demin has breakfast with his wife at Heshan village, in Shimen county
Xiong Demin, 71, who suffers from lung cancer, has breakfast with his 65-year-old wife Wen Jin'e, who suffers from cervical cancer, at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 24 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZB
June 23, 2014
A dog sleeps in front of Wen Jin'e and Xiong Demin's home at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central...
SHIMEN, China
A dog sleeps in front of a house at Heshan village, in Shimen county
A dog sleeps in front of Wen Jin'e and Xiong Demin's home at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. Wen suffers from cervical cancer and Xiong from lung cancer. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 21 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7Z7
June 23, 2014
Medicines used by 71-year-old Xiong Demin are gathered for a photograph at Heshan village, in Shimen...
SHIMEN, China
Medicines used by Xiong Demin are gathered for a photograph at Heshan village, in Shimen county
Medicines used by 71-year-old Xiong Demin are gathered for a photograph at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. Xiong suffers from skin and lung and skin cancer. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7Z4
June 23, 2014
Two disused tanks are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central...
SHIMEN, China
Two disused tanks are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county
Two disused tanks are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 20 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7YZ
June 23, 2014
The damaged walls of a cistern are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen...
SHIMEN, China
The damaged walls of a cistern are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen...
The damaged walls of a cistern are seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 4, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 19 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7YS
June 23, 2014
A sealed mine entrance is seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county,...
SHIMEN, China
A sealed mine entrance is seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county
A sealed mine entrance is seen at a closed realgar mining plant at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 18 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7YK
June 23, 2014
Water pipes are seen in a room at a closed realgar mining plant on a hill at Heshan village, in Shimen...
SHIMEN, China
Water pipes are seen in a room at a closed realgar mining plant on a hill at Heshan village, in Shimen...
Water pipes are seen in a room at a closed realgar mining plant on a hill at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 17 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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