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Search results for: Clinical-depression

ISRAEL-PALESTINIANS/VIOLENCE
RTX67UNH
June 06, 2018
A relative of a Palestinian, who was killed by Israeli troops, reacts at a hospital in Ramallah, in the...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Relative of a Palestinian, who was killed by Israeli troops, reacts at a hospital in Ramallah, in the...
A relative of a Palestinian, who was killed by Israeli troops, reacts at a hospital in Ramallah, in the occupied West Bank June 6, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79Q
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79N
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79H
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79F
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79E
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79D
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79C
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device at...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79B
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79A
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG5
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 39 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 39 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Jerry McCullough leaves after getting his check up by Dr. Ed Jelonek (R), working in his own free time, at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement of St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit, December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG4
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 38 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 38 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

A nurse prepares free medication beside a cross on a necklace at a pharmacy at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement of St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG3
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 37 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 37 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Don Paterson gets a rash looked at by Dr. Ed Jelonek (L), working on his own free time, at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement of St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG2
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 36 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 36 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Mary Hughes gets her blood pressure taken at the at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit, December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG1
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 35 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 35 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Jerry McCullough gets a check up by Dr. Ed Jelonek (R), working on his own free time, at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement of St. Leo's Catholic Church in Detroit, December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH RELIGION)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQG0
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 34 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 34 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Jerry McCullough gets a check up by Dr. Ed Jelonek (L), working in his own free time, at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement of St. Leo's Catholic Church in Detroit, December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQFZ
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 33 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 33 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

Dr. Ed Jelonek (R) works in his own free time as patients line up outside at the Order of Malta Medical and Dental Clinic for low income Michigan residents in the basement at the St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit, December 21, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
DETROIT/CHURCH
RTR2VQFY
December 30, 2011
THIS PICTURE IS 32 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH
THIS PICTURE IS 32 of 43 TO ACCOMPANY THE INSIGHT DETROIT/CHURCH. THE SERIES HIGHLIGHTS THE PROBLEMS FACING CATHOLIC CHURCHES IN DETROIT. SEARCH KEYWORD "CATHOLIC CHURCH DETROIT" TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES.

A sign is posted at the health clinic at the St. Leo Catholic Church in Detroit, December 17, 2011. St. Leo Catholic Church, located in one of the most abandoned pockets of the nation's most depressed city, is operating on life support. Built more than 120 years ago as Detroit was developing into a manufacturing powerhouse, St. Leo is one of the many area churches to have succumbed to a same priest and parishioner shortage that has plagued the Catholic Church in America. Picture taken December 17, 2011. To match Insight DETROIT/CHURCH REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION HEALTH)
SOMALIA
RTR2KOWF
April 01, 2011
A malnourished child sits inside a ward at Banaadir hospital in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, April...
Mogadishu, Somalia
A malnourished child sits inside a ward at Banaadir hospital in the Somali capital of Mogadishu
A malnourished child sits inside a ward at Banaadir hospital in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, April 1, 2011. REUTERS/Feisal Omar (SOMALIA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
INDIA/
RTR1RYR1
July 17, 2007
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan July 16, 2007. Picture taken July...
Vrindavan, India
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan July 16, 2007. Picture taken July 16, 2007. REUTERS/Adeel Halim (INDIA)
INDIA/
RTR1RYQN
July 17, 2007
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan July 16, 2007. Picture taken July...
Vrindavan, India
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan
A woman rests in an old age home in the pilgrimage town of Vrindavan July 16, 2007. Picture taken July 16, 2007. REUTERS/Adeel Halim (INDIA)
IRAQ/CASUALTIES
RTR1O6KS
April 01, 2007
Bodies of victims of violence are seen on the floor of a hospital morgue in Kirkuk, about 250 km (150...
Kirkuk, Iraq
Bodies of victims of violence are seen on the floor of a hospital morgue in Kirkuk
Bodies of victims of violence are seen on the floor of a hospital morgue in Kirkuk, about 250 km (150 miles) north of Baghdad, April 1, 2007. Violence in Iraq killed 1,861 civilians in March, a 13 percent increase from the previous month and despite a major security crackdown in Baghdad, Iraqi government tallies showed on Sunday. REUTERS/Slahaldeen Rasheed (IRAQ)
ISRAEL DEPRESSION
RTR1K3Z8
December 06, 2006
A hospital worker sits under a wired helmet while demonstrating an experimental treatment for clinical...
Hod Hasharon, Israel
To match feature ISRAEL DEPRESSION
A hospital worker sits under a wired helmet while demonstrating an experimental treatment for clinical depression at Shalvata Mental Health Care Centre in the central Israeli town of Hod Hasharon December 4, 2006. Scientists in Israel are reaching deeper into the minds of the clinically depressed to try to lift their spirits. Using a locally developed upgrade to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) therapy, scientists can now send electronic currents induced by alternating magnetic fields up to 8 cm (3 inches) into the brain to stimulate parts that had been out of reach. Picture taken December 4, 2006.To match feature ISRAEL DEPRESSION REUTERS/Gil Cohen Magen (ISRAEL)
ISRAEL DEPRESSION
RTR1K3Z5
December 06, 2006
A hospital worker sits under a wired helmet while demonstrating an experimental treatment for clinical...
Hod Hasharon, Israel
To match feature ISRAEL DEPRESSION
A hospital worker sits under a wired helmet while demonstrating an experimental treatment for clinical depression at Shalvata Mental Health Care Centre in the central Israeli town of Hod Hasharon December 4, 2006. Scientists in Israel are reaching deeper into the minds of the clinically depressed to try to lift their spirits. Using a locally developed upgrade to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) therapy, scientists can now send electronic currents induced by alternating magnetic fields up to 8 cm (3 inches) into the brain to stimulate parts that had been out of reach. Picture taken December 4, 2006.To match feature ISRAEL DEPRESSION REUTERS/Gil Cohen Magen (ISRAEL)
HEALTH TUBERCULOSIS
RTR1IOF4
October 25, 2006
A girl queues for anti-tuberculosis drugs at the Blue house clinic, run by medical charity Medecins Sans...
Nairobi, Kenya
Girl queues for anti-tuberculosis drugs at Blue house clinic in Mathare valley slums of Kenya's capital...
A girl queues for anti-tuberculosis drugs at the Blue house clinic, run by medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), in the Mathare valley slums of Kenya's capital Nairobi, October 25, 2006. Most of the nine million people who fall ill with tuberculosis each year lack access to adequate testing and diagnosis complicating efforts to stop its spread, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya (KENYA)
UKRAINE
RTR1CSD6
April 25, 2006
A cancer patient reacts in a hospital for oncological diseases in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk April...
Donetsk, Ukraine
Cancer patient reacts in hospital for oncological diseases in Donetsk
A cancer patient reacts in a hospital for oncological diseases in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk April 25, 2006. Large amounts of radioactive fallout came down on the regions around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant after the explosion of its fourth reactor in 1986, leading to a substantial increase of radiation-inflicted diseases in the population. Ukraine this week marks the 20th anniversary of the world's worst civil nuclear disaster. REUTERS/Alexander Khudotioply
EARTHQUAKE INDONESIA
RTRKH2Z
January 14, 2005
A resident sits on the side of the body of his brother at a hospital in the tsunami-hit city of Banda...
Banda Aceh, Indonesia
A resident sits on the side of the body of his brother at a hospital in the tsunami-hit city of Banda...
A resident sits on the side of the body of his brother at a hospital in the tsunami-hit city of Banda Aceh, on the Indonesian island of Sumatra January 14, 2005. The resident said he didn't have enough money to bring his brother back home. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama Pictures of the month January 2005 KM/LA
PEOPLE PETTY
RTR154H4
October 11, 2002
When veteran rocker Tom Petty recorded his previous album, 1999's
"Echo," he was dealing with divorce,...
New York, United States of America
FILE PHOTO OF TOM PETTY PERFORMING AT ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME
AWARDS.
When veteran rocker Tom Petty recorded his previous album, 1999's
"Echo," he was dealing with divorce, clinical depression and a tight
deadline. He rushed out a dark collection of songs, and never even
listened to the album after its completion. Petty, shown at the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame on March 18, just released his 12th album, "The
Last Record" and said he is doing a lot better, and no longer takes
medication. REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files FOR USE WITH FEATURE PEOPLE PETTY

RC/SV
PETTY
RTXLKQ3
March 19, 2002
When veteran rocker Tom Petty recorded his previous album, 1999's "Echo,"[ he was dealing with divorce,...
New York, USA
When veteran rocker Tom Petty recorded his previous album, 1999's "Echo,"[ he was dealing with divor.....
When veteran rocker Tom Petty recorded his previous album, 1999's "Echo,"[ he was dealing with divorce, clinical depression and a tight deadline. He rushed out a dark collection of songs, and never even listened to the album after its completion.] Petty, shown at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 18, just released his 12th album, "The Last Record" and said he is doing a lot better, and no longer takes medication.
CLINTON MENTAL
RTRPUJN
June 07, 1999
President Clinton's mental health advisor Tipper Gore, the wife of Vice President Al Gore, holds the...
Washington, USA
TIPPER GORE HOLDS THE HAND OF MIKE WALLACE.
President Clinton's mental health advisor Tipper Gore, the wife of Vice President Al Gore, holds the hand of "60 Minutes" correspondent Mike Wallace as he tells of his suffering from clinical depression as they attend the White House Conference on Mental Health at Howard University June 7. Tipper Gore also told of her past battle with depression. U.S. President Bill Clinton unveiled new measures to improve the lives of those who suffer from mental illness.

KL/RC/ME
CRIME SHOOTING
RTRRSN0
April 20, 1999
Belva Palmer (C), sister in law of suicide victim Carla Engelstad Hochhalter, accompanied by Carla's...
Littleton, USA
FAMILY MAKES STATEMENT IN COLUMBINE VICTIMS MOTHER'S SUICIDE.
Belva Palmer (C), sister in law of suicide victim Carla Engelstad Hochhalter, accompanied by Carla's sister Brenda Palmer (L) and sister-in-law Faye Rockswold, reads a family statement regarding the suicide death of Carla Hochhalter, mother of Columbine high school shooting victim Anne Marie Hochhalter, at a press conference in Littleton, October 25. Hochhalter committed suicide in a pawn shop six months after her daughter Anne Marie Hochhalter was shot and seriously wounded in the Columbine high school shootings April 20, 1999. Carla Hochhalter, who was diagnosed with acute clinical depression will be buried in Highlands Ranch, Colorado October 27.

GCC/JP
SHOOTING
RTRRSMC
April 20, 1999
The Hochhalter family released this portrait of Carla Engelstad Hochhalter October 25 at the conclusion...
Littleton, USA
CARLA HOCHHALTER IN FAMILY RELEASED PORTRAIT.
The Hochhalter family released this portrait of Carla Engelstad Hochhalter October 25 at the conclusion of a press conference, in which the family read a prepared statement regarding the suicide death of Hochhalter in Littleton, Colorado October 22. Carla Hochhalter committed suicide in a pawn shop six months after her daughter Anne Marie Hochhalter was shot and seriously wounded in the Columbine high school shootings April 20, 1999. Carla Hochhalter, who was diagnosed with acute clinical depression will be buried in Highlands Ranch, Colorado October 27.

GCC
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