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Search results for: Clinical-trial

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-VACCINE
RTX7JRVR
May 20, 2020
A view shows a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the treatment...
Saint Petersburg, Russia
A view shows a production line of levilimab drug at the production facility of BIOCAD company in Saint...
A view shows a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the treatment of complications among the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at the production facility of BIOCAD biotechnology company in Saint Petersburg, Russia May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Anton Vaganov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-VACCINE
RTX7JRTJ
May 20, 2020
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in...
Saint Petersburg, Russia
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug at the production facility of BIOCAD company...
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the treatment of complications among the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at the production facility of BIOCAD biotechnology company in Saint Petersburg, Russia May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Anton Vaganov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-VACCINE
RTX7JRTG
May 20, 2020
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in...
Saint Petersburg, Russia
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug at the production facility of BIOCAD company...
Employees are seen next to a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the treatment of complications among the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at the production facility of BIOCAD biotechnology company in Saint Petersburg, Russia May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Anton Vaganov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-VACCINE
RTX7JRSU
May 20, 2020
An employee works on a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the...
Saint Petersburg, Russia
An employee works on a production line of levilimab drug at the production facility of BIOCAD company...
An employee works on a production line of levilimab drug, which is undergoing clinical trials in the treatment of complications among the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients, at the production facility of BIOCAD biotechnology company in Saint Petersburg, Russia May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Anton Vaganov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE
RTX7G58P
April 28, 2020
A pharmacist displays a sticker with the name of tocilizumab molecule, which is used in the treatment...
Cambrai, France
A pharmacist displays a sticker with the name of tocilizumab molecule at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital...
A pharmacist displays a sticker with the name of tocilizumab molecule, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital, France, April 28, 2020. French Health Ministry mentioned in a statement "promising results" in a clinical trial, led by Paris University Hospital AP-HP, involving tocilizumab. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE
RTX7G56B
April 28, 2020
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at...
Cambrai, France
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital, France, April 28, 2020. French Health Ministry mentioned in a statement "promising results" in a clinical trial, led by Paris University Hospital AP-HP, involving tocilizumab. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE
RTX7G562
April 28, 2020
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at...
Cambrai, France
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital
A pharmacist displays a box of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital, France, April 28, 2020. French Health Ministry mentioned in a statement "promising results" in a clinical trial, led by Paris University Hospital AP-HP, involving tocilizumab. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE
RTX7G561
April 28, 2020
A pharmacist displays boxes of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at...
Cambrai, France
A pharmacist displays boxes of tocilizumab at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital
A pharmacist displays boxes of tocilizumab, which is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, at the pharmacy of Cambrai hospital, France, April 28, 2020. French Health Ministry mentioned in a statement "promising results" in a clinical trial, led by Paris University Hospital AP-HP, involving tocilizumab. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TREATMENTS
RTS36ONH
March 19, 2020
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist, works with coronavirus samples as researchers begin a trial...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Researchers set up new labs to help fight coronavirus at the University of Minnesota
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist, works with coronavirus samples as researchers begin a trial to see whether malaria treatment hydroxychloroquine can prevent or reduce the severity of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Craig Lassig
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TREATMENTS
RTS36OML
March 19, 2020
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist, and Robyn Kincaid, technical specialist, work with coronavirus...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Researchers set up new labs to help fight coronavirus at the University of Minnesota
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist, and Robyn Kincaid, technical specialist, work with coronavirus samples as researchers begin a trial to see whether malaria treatment hydroxychloroquine can prevent or reduce the severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Craig Lassig
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TREATMENTS
RTS36OM8
March 19, 2020
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist at the Microbiology Research Facility, talks with colleagues...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Researchers set up new labs to help fight coronavirus at the University of Minnesota
Kylene Karnuth, a clinical lab scientist at the Microbiology Research Facility, talks with colleagues as researchers begin a trial to see whether malaria treatment hydroxychloroquine can prevent or reduce the severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Craig Lassig
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5Z7
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5T2
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5R6
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5R5
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5OI
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5O5
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to his lawyer Ulrike Baumann during his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5O1
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, speaks to his lawyer Ulrike Baumann during his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y5MR
June 06, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 6, 2019. REUTERS/Hauke-Christian Dittrich/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y00E
June 05, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohssen Assanimoghaddam/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6Y00D
June 05, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohssen Assanimoghaddam/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6XZX2
June 05, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, sits next...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, sits next to his lawyer Ulrike Baumann during his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohssen Assanimoghaddam/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6XZWI
June 05, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohssen Assanimoghaddam/POOL
GERMANY-CRIME/NURSE
RTX6XZVN
June 05, 2019
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Oldenburg, Germany
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends...
Niels Hoegel, accused of murdering 100 patients at the clinics in Delmenhorst and Oldenburg, attends his trial in Oldenburg, Germany June 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohssen Assanimoghaddam/POOL
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPMV
March 11, 2019
Dr. Matthew Hsieh, Dr. John Tisdale and Lynndrick Holmes discuss Holmes' recovery from sickle cell anemia...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Hsieh, Tisdale and Holmes at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research...
Dr. Matthew Hsieh, Dr. John Tisdale and Lynndrick Holmes discuss Holmes' recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Tisdale's clinical trial at the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPMT
March 11, 2019
Dr. Matthew Hsieh, Dr. John Tisdale and Lynndrick Holmes discuss Holmes' recovery from sickle cell anemia...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Hsieh, Tisdale and Holmes at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research...
Dr. Matthew Hsieh, Dr. John Tisdale and Lynndrick Holmes discuss Holmes' recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Tisdale's clinical trial at the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPMS
March 11, 2019
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, walks with Dr. John Tisdale through the National Institute of Health's Clinical...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Holmes and Tisdale at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, walks with Dr. John Tisdale through the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center after the agency announced a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. Holmes has shown significant recovery from the disease after participating in Tisdale's clinical trial. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPMR
March 11, 2019
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, walks with Dr. John Tisdale through the National Institute of Health's Clinical...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Holmes and Tisdale at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, walks with Dr. John Tisdale through the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center after the agency announced a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. Holmes has shown significant recovery from the disease after participating in Tisdale's clinical trial. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPMG
March 11, 2019
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Holmes at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John Tisdale's clinical trial at the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPM9
March 11, 2019
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Holmes at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John Tisdale's clinical trial at the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott
SCIENCE-SICKLE CELL/
RTX6QPM8
March 11, 2019
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Holmes at the NIH Clinical Center after a breakthrough in sickle cell anemia research
Lynndrick Holmes, 29, discusses his recovery from sickle cell anemia after participating in Dr. John Tisdale's clinical trial at the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, U.S. March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott
NORTHKOREA-MALAYSIA/KIM-AIRPORT
RTX3HWNZ
October 24, 2017
Armed police stand guard as Indonesian Siti Aisyah and Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, who are on trial for...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Armed police stand guard as Indonesian Siti Aisyah and Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, who are on trial for...
Armed police stand guard as Indonesian Siti Aisyah and Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, who are on trial for the killing of Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korea's leader, revisit Menara Clinic at Kuala Lumpur International Airport Two in Sepang, Malaysia October 24, 2017. REUTERS/Lai Seng Sin
AIDS-DAY/CURE
RTSU490
December 01, 2016
An IV bag of Takeda Pharmaceutical's drug that is part of a clinical trial for a functional HIV cure...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
An IV bag of an HIV medication being tested at the National Institutes of Health is pictured in Bethesda...
An IV bag of Takeda Pharmaceutical's drug that is part of a clinical trial for a functional HIV cure at National Institutes of Health is pictured in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. November 22, 2016 in this still image from video. REUTERS/Gershon Peaks/RVN
AIDS-DAY/CURE
RTSU48V
December 01, 2016
Manni Baez, 30, prepares to receive an antibody infusion of a drug that is part of a clinical trial for...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Manni Baez takes some of his daily antiviral medications for HIV at the National Institutes of Health...
Manni Baez, 30, prepares to receive an antibody infusion of a drug that is part of a clinical trial for a functional HIV cure at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. November 22, 2016 in this still image from video. REUTERS/Gershon Peaks/RVN
AIDS-DAY/CURE
RTSU48U
December 01, 2016
Manni Baez (L), 30, prepares to receive an antibody infusion of a drug that is part of a clinical trial...
Bethesda, UNITED STATES
Manni Baez, 30, a clinical trial patient, takes some of his daily antiviral medications for HIV at the...
Manni Baez (L), 30, prepares to receive an antibody infusion of a drug that is part of a clinical trial for a functional HIV cure at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. November 22, 2016 in this still image from video. REUTERS/Gershon Peaks/RVN
USA-ELECTION/WOMEN
RTSJBNX
July 23, 2016
Neurosurgeon Linda Liau, MD, 49, Professor and Director of the UCLA Brain Tumor Program (C) removes a...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Women workers on the Clinton campaign
Neurosurgeon Linda Liau, MD, 49, Professor and Director of the UCLA Brain Tumor Program (C) removes a brain tumour from a patient at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, United States, May 26, 2016. Liau has been a neurosurgeon for 25 years and has developed a brain cancer vaccine that is in clinical trials. “It’s a very male-dominated profession... When you walk into the room they assume you’re the nurse or the assistant as opposed to the actual surgeon," Liau said. "I think ultimately the goal would be to be gender-blind completely, so the fact that we’re even talking about having a female president as a novelty is in a way sad." Picture taken May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "WOMEN WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
USA-ELECTION/WOMEN
RTSJBND
July 23, 2016
Neurosurgeon Linda Liau, MD, 49, Professor and Director of the UCLA Brain Tumor Program walks out of...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Women workers on the Clinton campaign
Neurosurgeon Linda Liau, MD, 49, Professor and Director of the UCLA Brain Tumor Program walks out of the operating theatre after successfully removing a tumour from a patient at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, United States, May 26, 2016. Liau has been a neurosurgeon for 25 years and has developed a brain cancer vaccine that is in clinical trials. ÒItÕs a very male-dominated profession... When you walk into the room they assume youÕre the nurse or the assistant as opposed to the actual surgeon," Liau said. "I think ultimately the goal would be to be gender-blind completely, so the fact that weÕre even talking about having a female president as a novelty is in a way sad." Picture taken May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "WOMEN WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LVA
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, looks...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci looks at his mobile device as he prepares to answer reporters' questions about the Zika virus after...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, looks at his mobile device as he prepares to answer reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LV8
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci (L), director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, participates...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci participates in a talk with Rubenstein at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon...
Dr. Anthony Fauci (L), director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, participates in a talk with Carlyle Group CEO David Rubenstein (R) at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LUS
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LUQ
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci discusses the Zika virus during remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LUP
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci discusses the Zika virus during remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LTZ
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LTY
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, answers reporters' questions about the Zika virus after his remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LKH
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci discusses the Zika virus during remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-ZIKA/
RTX24LKE
January 29, 2016
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Fauci discusses the Zika virus during remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, delivers remarks at the Economic Club of Washington at their winter luncheon in Washington January 29, 2016. On Thursday Fauci said a potential candidate for a vaccine for the Zika virus, which may begin clinical trials in people by the end of this year, was based on work done on the West Nile virus. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22K50
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine (R) and Gilles Hedan (L), professor of clinical neurology, leave...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news...
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine (R) and Gilles Hedan (L), professor of clinical neurology, leave after a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22K13
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news...
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22K0Z
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news...
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine and Gilles Hedan, professor of clinical neurology, attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22JYF
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine (L) arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22JYE
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
FRANCE-HEALTH/TEST
RTX22JY1
January 15, 2016
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January...
Rennes, France
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes
French Health Minister Marisol Touraine arrives to attend a news conference in Rennes, France, January 15, 2016. One person has been left brain dead and five others are in a serious condition after taking part in a clinical trial in France of an experimental medicine from an unnamed drug company, the French Health Ministry said on Friday. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79Q
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79N
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79H
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79F
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79E
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79D
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79C
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device at...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79B
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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