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Search results for: Coelacanth

COMOROS
RTXM7EN 
September 13, 2003 
- PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03 - Boys play with a freshly caught fish at the coastal village of Salimani in the... 
Moroni, Comoros 
- PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03 - Boys play with a freshly caught fish at the coastal village of Salimani in t..... 
- PHOTO TAKEN 13SEP03 - Boys play with a freshly caught fish at the coastal village of Salimani in the Indian Ocean Comoros islands, September 13, 2003. Fishing provides an income for many of the villagers inhabiting settlements dotted along the coast of the volcanic archipelago, where men set out at night in dugout canoes to seek their catch. The Comoros waters are home to the coelacanthe, a living "fossil fish" dating back to the time of the dinosaurs. Environmentalists encourage local fisherman to avoid landing the coelacanthes, hoping to create a marine park to conserve the rare species, for which Comoros provides a key breeding ground. 
RTR2ZPK 
September 13, 2003 
Boys play with a freshly caught fish at the coastal village of Salimani
in the Indian Ocean Comoros... 
Comoros 
BOYS PLAY WITH A FISH IN THE COASTAL VILLAGE OF SALIMANI IN THE INDIAN
OCEAN COMOROS ISLANDS. 
Boys play with a freshly caught fish at the coastal village of Salimani
in the Indian Ocean Comoros islands, September 13, 2003. Fishing
provides an income for many of the villagers inhabiting settlements
dotted along the coast of the volcanic archipelago, where men set out
at night in dugout canoes to seek their catch. The Comoros waters are
home to the coelacanthe, a living "fossil fish" dating back to the time
of the dinosaurs. Environmentalists encourage local fisherman to avoid
landing the coelacanthes, hoping to create a marine park to conserve
the rare species, for which Comoros provides a key breeding ground.
REUTERS/ Antony Njuguna PP03090073

AN- 
KENYA FEATURE
RTRPO5C 
November 21, 2001 
Staff members of the department of Fish Studies at the National Museum
of Kenya display November 21,... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
SCIENTIST DISPLAY FISH COELACANTH THOUGHT EXTINCT WITH THE DINOSAURS. 
Staff members of the department of Fish Studies at the National Museum
of Kenya display November 21, 2001, a Coelacanth fish weighing 77
kilograms and measuring 1.7 metres caught by Kenyan fishermen at the
coastal town of Malindi in April this year. There are few species of
this deep sea fish which was thought to have vanished with the
dinosaurs 65 milllion years ago. This particular strain, explained the
scientists gives birth to young fish as opposed to laying eggs.
REUTERS/George Mulala REUTERS

GMM 
KENYA
RTXKWEO 
November 19, 2001 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coel..... 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth fish caught by Kenyan fishermen at the coastal town of Malindi in April this year. There are few species of this deep sea fish which was thought to have vanished with the dinosaurs 65 milllion years ago. This particular strain, explained the scientists gives birth to young fish as opposed to laying eggs. 
KENYA
RTXKWEN 
November 19, 2001 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coel..... 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth fish caught by Kenyan fishermen at the coastal town of Malindi in April this year. There are few species of this deep sea fish which was thought to have vanished with the dinosaurs 65 milllion years ago. This particular strain, explained the scientists gives birth to young "pups" as opposed to laying eggs. 
KENYA FEATURE
RTRPNMT 
November 19, 2001 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya
display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
SCIENTISTS DISPLAY COELACANTH FISH THOUGHT EXTINCT WITH THE DINOSAURS. 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya
display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth fish caught by Kenyan fishermen
at the coastal town of Malindi in April this year. There are few
species of this deep sea fish which was thought to have vanished with
the dinosaurs 65 milllion years ago. This particular strain, explained
the scientists gives birth to young "pups" as opposed to laying eggs.
REUTERS/George Mulala

GMM/WS 
KENYA FEATURE
RTRPLTE 
November 19, 2001 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya
display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
SCIENTISTS DISPLAY FISH THOUGHT EXTINCT WITH THE DINOSAURS. 
Staff of department of Fish Studies at the National Museum of Kenya
display November 19, 2001 a Coelacanth fish caught by Kenyan fishermen
at the coastal town of Malindi in April this year. There are few
species of this deep sea fish which was thought to have vanished with
the dinosaurs 65 milllion years ago. This particular strain, explained
the scientists gives birth to young fish as opposed to laying eggs.
REUTERS/George Mulala

GMM/WS 
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