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AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBTW 
October 20, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, sits at her house in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 20,... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, sits at her house in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 20, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBQR 
October 20, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, hoses down the ground outside her house in Kabul,... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, hoses down the ground outside her house in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 20, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBQQ 
October 20, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, puts nail polish at home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, puts nail polish at home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 20, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBTR 
October 19, 2021 
A whiteboard used by Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, is seen at her home in Kabul,... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
A whiteboard used by Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, is seen at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 19, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBTQ 
October 19, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, studies on YouTube to keep herself busy at her home... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, studies on YouTube to keep herself busy at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 19, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBQP 
October 19, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, sits with her sister, Sewita, 19, at their home in... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, sits with her sister, Sewita, 19, at their home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 19, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home."REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBQN 
October 19, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student copies what she has learnt on YouTube onto a small... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student copies what she has learnt on YouTube onto a small whiteboard while her sister, Sewita, 19, looks on, at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 19, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/GIRLS-EDUCATION
RTXJFBQI 
October 19, 2021 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, uses YouTube to study at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan,... 
Kabul, Afghanistan 
The Wider Image: Dreams on hold: Afghan girls and women are desperate to get back to class 
Sahar, 17, an 11th grade secondary school student, uses YouTube to study at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 19, 2021. Sahar wants to become an engineer, but, for now at least, has to learn at home as best she can. "I am trying to continue my lessons at home but nevertheless the environment at school, the classroom, our friends and teachers is something different compared to being at home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "BENSEMRA EDUCATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
PANDORA-PAPERS/ C
RTXI2LTJ 
October 04, 2021 
Graphic shows how big the leakage of Pandora Papers documents is compared to other ICIJ projects since... 
How big is the Pandora Papers leak? C 
Graphic shows how big the leakage of Pandora Papers documents is compared to other ICIJ projects since the first release in 2013 
USA-POLICING/ C
RTXH3YZG 
September 13, 2021 
Chart compares police dispatches in Minneapolis before and after the death of George Floyd by type. 
UNITED STATES 
MINNEAPOLIS-DISPATCHES-TYPE C 
Chart compares police dispatches in Minneapolis before and after the death of George Floyd by type. 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN
RTXGWTZ4 
September 09, 2021 
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks in front of graphs showing Japan's inoculation rate with... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga holds a news conference in Tokyo 
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks in front of graphs showing Japan's inoculation rate with COVID-19 vaccine comparing with other countries, during his news conference at his office in Tokyo, Japan, September 9, 2021. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Pool 
In the Headlines
In the Headlines 
Migrant rescue on the Mediterranean 
24 PICTURES 
In the Headlines
In the Headlines 
Fire rips through Milan apartment building 
17 PICTURES 
Wider Image
Wider Image 
'For fallen souls' - A survivor says Myanmar fight must go on 
16 PICTURES 
SOCCER-ENGLAND-MCI/ C
RTS81THN 
May 12, 2021 
UPDATE 2022 season Manchester City were confirmed as Premier League champions for the third time in four... 
UPDATE Manchester City’s Premier League championship compar C 
UPDATE 2022 season Manchester City were confirmed as Premier League champions for the third time in four seasons on May 11, after second-placed rivals Manchester United lost 2-1 at home to Leicester City. 
INDONESIA-TIN/
RTXD1LCO 
May 01, 2021 
Amirudin, 43, a field supervisor of the state tin mining company PT Timah, rests on a makeshift hammock,... 
TOBOALI, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Mining tin from the sea 
Amirudin, 43, a field supervisor of the state tin mining company PT Timah, rests on a makeshift hammock, on a tin pontoon off the coast of Toboali, on the southern shores of the island of Bangka, Indonesia, May 1, 2021. Timah has been ramping up production from the sea. Company data shows its proven tin reserve on land was 16,399 tonnes last year, compared with 265,913 tonnes offshore. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "KURNIAWAN TIN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-STUDENTS
RTXC26W1 
April 13, 2021 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus... 
Allentown, UNITED STATES 
COVID-19 tested many students' mental health; some U.S. schools are taking action 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to their word of the week, "celebration" at Kratzer Elementary School in Allentown, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 13, 2021. Students drew on their desks to visually portray this idea with dry erasable markers. Picture taken April 13, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah Beier 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-STUDENTS
RTXC26VX 
April 13, 2021 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus... 
Allentown, UNITED STATES 
COVID-19 tested many students' mental health; some U.S. schools are taking action 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to their word of the week, "celebration" at Kratzer Elementary School in Allentown, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 13, 2021. Students drew on their desks to visually portray this idea with dry erasable markers. Picture taken April 13, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah Beier TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-STUDENTS
RTXC26VV 
April 13, 2021 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus... 
Allentown, UNITED STATES 
COVID-19 tested many students' mental health; some U.S. schools are taking action 
Samantha Wiik's fourth grade class does an activity comparing the positive outcomes of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to their word of the week, "celebration" at Kratzer Elementary School in Allentown, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 13, 2021. Students drew on their desks to visually portray this idea with dry erasable markers. Picture taken April 13, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah Beier 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/VACCINE-EFFECTS
RTXAM2RA 
March 19, 2021 
A visual explainer about common and rare conditions linked to the coronavirus vaccines 
Interactive Content 
Comparing the possible risks of the COVID-19 vaccines 
A visual explainer about common and rare conditions linked to the coronavirus vaccines 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BATS C
RTX9YW5P 
March 02, 2021 
Chart showing how the average life span and mass of bats compare to other species. Bats have relatively... 
Longevity of bats C 
Chart showing how the average life span and mass of bats compare to other species. Bats have relatively long life spans for their body size, which can make it easier for viruses to persist as chronic infections are more common. 
SANTE-CORONAVIRUS/DECES.FC
RTX8VWXS 
February 03, 2021 
Différence en pourcentage entre les décès hebdomadaires recensés en 2020 et ceux enregistrés en moyenne... 
Surmortalité en Europe en 2020.FC 
Différence en pourcentage entre les décès hebdomadaires recensés en 2020 et ceux enregistrés en moyenne sur la période 2015-2019, à semaines comparables. 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON C
RTX8LNF4 
January 11, 2021 
The graphic shows how a group of Brazilian researchers compared the carbon content of native primary... 
Brazil 
The ABC of carbon measurement in the rainforest C 
The graphic shows how a group of Brazilian researchers compared the carbon content of native primary rainforest and naturally regrown replanted-forest to measure the amount greenhouse gas in the rainforest. 
PHILIPPINES-EDUCATION/
RTX8KR9W 
January 06, 2021 
College students Jenebyl Cipres, 19, Almer Acuno, 21, Jester Rafon, 20, and Rosemine Gonzaga, 19, work... 
Laguna, Philippines 
The Wider Image: Mountain trekking to catch a signal - meet the Philippine students determined to study... 
College students Jenebyl Cipres, 19, Almer Acuno, 21, Jester Rafon, 20, and Rosemine Gonzaga, 19, work on online worksheets in a hut on a mountain, as their community does not have enough signal for internet connection, following the suspension of physical classes during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sitio Papatahan, Paete, Laguna, Philippines, October 22, 2020. "I always fear I wouldn't be able to follow along to our lessons compared to my classmates who are in a better situation, in a more comfortable environment. I'm not jealous because I'm used to this way of living. I'm just scared to be left behind," said Rafon. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH "LOPEZ SCHOOL ONLINE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX8FMGK 
December 12, 2020 
Women compare their Chameau boots at Ripley Farmer's Market as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) lockdown... 
Ripley, United Kingdom 
Ripley Farmers Market 
Women compare their Chameau boots at Ripley Farmer's Market as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) lockdown eases in Ripley, Surrey, Britain, December 12, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/ICEBERG C
RTX8FH2F 
December 11, 2020 
Islands that are a comparable size to the iceberg 
The size of A68a C 
Islands that are a comparable size to the iceberg 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/ICEBERG C
RTX8FGYA 
December 11, 2020 
Islands that are a comparable size to the iceberg 
The size of A68a C 
Islands that are a comparable size to the iceberg 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUC 
November 23, 2020 
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story 
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos, during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. Reuters photographer Ricardo Moraes: "About 10 hours into covering clashes between drug gangs battling to take control of the Sao Carlos slums complex in Rio de Janeiro, and a police operation to quell the violence, I found Juliana sobbing in anguish next to the body of her husband Davi, who was found shot dead after the conflict. I was struck by the contrasts in the scene – Juliana's sorrow compared to the stoic faces of the police officers, the military uniforms and weapons surrounding her. Covering violence in Rio is always a challenge. Dealing with the police, residents or victims is not easy, and the situation can change at any minute. That day, I was witness to a lot of distressing events – people being taken hostage, heavy shootouts, police chasing gang members and Juliana's despair. 'My husband, he was what he was. But he was a good man," Juliana said to me the day after she lost Davi. "He was my prince.' REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
SAUDI-TURKEY/TRADE
RTX83HDR 
October 19, 2020 
A customer compares between dairy products at a supermarket, after Saudi Arabia's retail stores urged... 
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 
Saudi supermarkets urge customers to boycott Turkish products 
A customer compares between dairy products at a supermarket, after Saudi Arabia's retail stores urged customers to boycott Turkish products, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, October 18, 2020. Picture taken October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ahmed Yosri 
SANTE-CORONAVIRUS/PLASTIQUE-RECYCLE.FC
RTX82SRO 
October 16, 2020 
Graphique comparant les prix du plastique neuf et du plastique recyclé 
Un marché peu porteur.FC 
Graphique comparant les prix du plastique neuf et du plastique recyclé 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S 
October 15, 2020 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R 
October 15, 2020 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E 
October 15, 2020 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C 
October 15, 2020 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
JAPAN-POLITICS/ABE C
RTX7S6UU 
August 28, 2020 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s approval ratings compared to his previous term, and to previous... 
Japan 
Abe approval ratings C 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s approval ratings compared to his previous term, and to previous Prime Ministers. 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL-STUDENTS
RTX7QWBB 
August 21, 2020 
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect... 
Sydney, Australia 
The Wider Image: Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study 
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect the disappearance of international students to cost billions of dollars. Data on how many international students have left the country this year is not yet available, but anecdotal evidence on departures and data on new enrolments paints a worrying picture. New enrolments of international students, who generally make up about 20% of all university students in Australia, grew by an average of 10% over the past two years. But growth in the first six months of this year was negligible as Australia closed its borders in March to all foreigners because of the pandemic. The slowdown in foreign student enrolments mean Australian universities are facing a revenue hit of between A$3.1 billion and A$4.8 billion ($2.2-$3.5 billion) this year alone, Catriona Jackson, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, told Reuters. New enrolments from China fell 8% in the first half of the year, compared with a gain of 4% across 2019, according to government data. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL-STUDENTS
RTX7QSQ3 
August 20, 2020 
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect... 
Sydney, Australia 
The Wider Image: Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study 
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect the disappearance of international students to cost billions of dollars. Data on how many international students have left the country this year is not yet available, but anecdotal evidence on departures and data on new enrolments paints a worrying picture. New enrolments of international students, who generally make up about 20% of all university students in Australia, grew by an average of 10% over the past two years. But growth in the first six months of this year was negligible as Australia closed its borders in March to all foreigners because of the pandemic. The slowdown in foreign student enrolments mean Australian universities are facing a revenue hit of between A$3.1 billion and A$4.8 billion ($2.2-$3.5 billion) this year alone, Catriona Jackson, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, told Reuters. New enrolments from China fell 8% in the first half of the year, compared with a gain of 4% across 2019, according to government data. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
LIBAN-BEYROUTH/EXPLOSION.FC
RTX7QHUV 
August 19, 2020 
Le graphique compare la puissance de l'explosion à Beyrouth à d'autres explosions accidentelles et armes... 
Lebanon 
Puissance de l'explosion à Beyrouth.FC 
Le graphique compare la puissance de l'explosion à Beyrouth à d'autres explosions accidentelles et armes conventionnelles. 
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST
RTX7PJ8D 
August 14, 2020 
Comparing the strength of the explosion in Lebanon to other accidents involving ammonium nitrate and... 
Interactive Content 
How powerful was the Beirut blast? 
Comparing the strength of the explosion in Lebanon to other accidents involving ammonium nitrate and destructive military weapons 
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST C
RTX7PIW3 
August 14, 2020 
Graphic shows the scale of Beirut's blast compared to other accidental explosions and conventional weapons.... 
Lebanon 
The scale of the Beirut’s blast C 
Graphic shows the scale of Beirut's blast compared to other accidental explosions and conventional weapons. 
BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS/MINING C
RTS3FUJJ 
June 25, 2020 
Diagram showing the size and shape of illegal gold mines in Brazil's remote Yanomami reservation compared... 
Brazil 
The scale of illegal gold mines in Brazil's remote Amazon C 
Diagram showing the size and shape of illegal gold mines in Brazil's remote Yanomami reservation compared to previous years. 
ASIA-STORM/INDIA C
RTX7JXAT 
May 21, 2020 
Comparing Amphan's wind speeds to other cyclones in the Bay of Bengal 
Wind speed of Cyclone Amph C 
Comparing Amphan's wind speeds to other cyclones in the Bay of Bengal 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-HOSPITAL
RTX7IN4L 
May 12, 2020 
Doctor Luciana Souza compares two different chest x-rays of a patient as she talks to a colleague at... 
Guarulhos, Brazil 
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Guarulhos 
Doctor Luciana Souza compares two different chest x-rays of a patient as she talks to a colleague at a field hospital set up to treat patients suffering from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Guarulhos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil, May 12, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7EDOT 
April 19, 2020 
U.S. President Donald Trump compares a swab for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing with regular cotton... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. President Trump attends daily coronavirus task force briefing in Washington 
U.S. President Donald Trump compares a swab for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing with regular cotton swabs during the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 19, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7EDF7 
April 19, 2020 
U.S. President Donald Trump compares a swab for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing with regular cotton... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. President Trump attends daily coronavirus task force briefing in Washington 
U.S. President Donald Trump compares a swab for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing with regular cotton swabs during the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 19, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-3D
RTS37FIT 
March 27, 2020 
A 3D-printed protective mask made to combat coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is seen in Oklahoma City,... 
Oklahoma City, UNITED STATES 
A 3D-printed protective mask is seen in Oklahoma City 
A 3D-printed protective mask made to combat coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is seen in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S. March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Nick Oxford 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-TESTING
RTS37119 
March 24, 2020 
Actions by countries have varied and shifted over time. Here’s how they compare. embed code and instructions:... 
Interactive Content 
Coronavirus testing: Which countries are leading? media-interactive 
Actions by countries have varied and shifted over time. Here’s how they compare. embed code and instructions: https://reut.rs/3bpZ4OF 
USA-ELECTION/VOTETOTALS
RTS36GSG 
March 18, 2020 
UPDATE Updated for March 17 races How 2020 compares to past competitive primary seasons embed code and... 
Interactive Content 
UPDATE Democratic primary and caucus vote totals media-interactive 
UPDATE Updated for March 17 races How 2020 compares to past competitive primary seasons embed code and instructions: https://reut.rs/3d7cY9P 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ C
RTS36EJZ 
March 17, 2020 
Chart comparing the rate of outbreak in various countries 
COVID-19's exponential growth EPS C 
Chart comparing the rate of outbreak in various countries 
USA-ELECTION/VOTETOTALS
RTS35NKG 
March 11, 2020 
How 2020 compares to past competitive primary seasons embed code and instructions: https://reut.rs/3aHXFlW... 
Interactive Content 
Democratic primary and caucus vote totals media-interactive 
How 2020 compares to past competitive primary seasons embed code and instructions: https://reut.rs/3aHXFlW 
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