Ajax loader

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Difficult-job

UKRAINE-CRISIS/REFUGEES
RTS78MXG 
April 21, 2022 
Lidmyla Perenhonets, 32, prepares soup in a special cooking and catering course for Ukrainian refugees.... 
Valencia, Spain 
Special cooking and catering course for Ukrainian refugees, in Alicante 
Lidmyla Perenhonets, 32, prepares soup in a special cooking and catering course for Ukrainian refugees. Before the war she was a primary school teacher in Vinnytsa and thinks it will be difficult to get her qualification recognised, so she has decided that working in the hotel and catering business will be a good option for her future, in Alicante, Spain, April 21, 2022. REUTERS/Eva Manez 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFFH5 
July 11, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, sits in an ambulance, preparing to take the body of 56-year-old... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, sits in an ambulance, preparing to take the body of 56-year-old woman who passed away at home due to complications related to COVID-19, for burial in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 11, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFFGZ 
July 11, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, dons his personal protective equipment at the group's headquarters,... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, dons his personal protective equipment at the group's headquarters, before recovering the body of a person who has passed away due to complications related to COVID-19 whilst isolating at home in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 11, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFFGJ 
July 11, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, rests at the group's headquarters during his shift recovering... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, rests at the group's headquarters during his shift recovering bodies of those who have passed away due to complications related to COVID-19 whilst isolating at home in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 11, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFFH4 
July 09, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, rests at home after his shift recovering the bodies of... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker, rests at home after his shift recovering the bodies of those who have passed away due to complications related to COVID-19 whilst isolating at home in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 9, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFG0Y 
July 08, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker wears personal protective equipment as he takes a short-break... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker wears personal protective equipment as he takes a short-break while carrying the coffin of 64-year-old Yoyoh Sa'diah who passed away due to complications related to COVID-19 whilst isolating at her home in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 8, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDONESIA-UNDERTAKERS
RTXEFFC5 
July 08, 2021 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker wearing personal protective equipment has a rest while recovering... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Volunteer undertakers bear the dead from Indonesian homes as COVID deaths rise 
Ardi Novriansyah, 41, a volunteer undertaker wearing personal protective equipment has a rest while recovering the body of 64-year-old Yoyoh Sa'diah who passed away due to complications related to COVID-19 whilst isolating at home in Bogor, West Java province, Indonesia, July 8, 2021. Ardi says his interest in humanity led him to take such a difficult job along with the camaraderie with his fellow volunteers. "What's important is that we have a desire to help as volunteers, for humanity." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "VOLUNTEER UNDERTAKER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-CLOWN
RTXB9YSD 
April 07, 2021 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, wait in a queue to receive donated food... 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Clowning is serious business for doctor to homeless in Brazil's 'crackland' 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, wait in a queue to receive donated food at Princesa Isabel square, in an area known as "cracolandia," or crackland, a dangerous wasteland of about eight blocks in the historic center of Sao Paulo, Brazil, March 18, 2021. After a delay in congressional approval, payments are set to resume this month at an even lower rate. For many, that help is too little, too late. Millions have sunk into poverty since the start of the year. For Reis and Simoes, that meant losing their home. The couple moved into a makeshift tent, strung between two trees, on a public square in crackland this year. "As long as there are no jobs, the emergency payment should have been maintained as it was," Reis said. "It's been difficult, very difficult," said Reis. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli SEARCH "CRACKLAND PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-CLOWN
RTXB9YSC 
April 07, 2021 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, talk inside the tent that they currently... 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Clowning is serious business for doctor to homeless in Brazil's 'crackland' 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, talk inside the tent that they currently live in at Princesa Isabel square, in an area known as "cracolandia," or crackland, a dangerous wasteland of about eight blocks in the historic center of Sao Paulo, Brazil, March 23, 2021. After a delay in congressional approval, payments are set to resume this month at an even lower rate. For many, that help is too little, too late. Millions have sunk into poverty since the start of the year. For Reis and Simoes, that meant losing their home. The couple moved into a makeshift tent, strung between two trees, on a public square in crackland this year. "As long as there are no jobs, the emergency payment should have been maintained as it was," Reis said. "It's been difficult, very difficult," said Reis. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli SEARCH "CRACKLAND PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-CLOWN
RTXB9YS9 
April 07, 2021 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, wait for their mobile phones to charge at... 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Clowning is serious business for doctor to homeless in Brazil's 'crackland' 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, wait for their mobile phones to charge at a Psychosocial Care Center near Princesa Isabel square, in an area known as "cracolandia," or crackland, a dangerous wasteland of about eight blocks in the historic center of Sao Paulo, Brazil, March 11, 2021. The homeless population has surged after 600 reais ($106.16) per month government emergency aid payments to the poor were reduced and eventually ran out at the end of 2020. After a delay in congressional approval, payments are set to resume this month at an even lower rate. For many, that help is too little, too late. Millions have sunk into poverty since the start of the year. For Reis and Simoes, that meant losing their home. The couple moved into a makeshift tent, strung between two trees, on a public square in crackland this year. "As long as there are no jobs, the emergency payment should have been maintained as it was," Reis said. "It's been difficult, very difficult," said Reis. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli SEARCH "CRACKLAND PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-CLOWN
RTXB9YS6 
April 07, 2021 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, talk inside the tent that they currently... 
Sao Paulo, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Clowning is serious business for doctor to homeless in Brazil's 'crackland' 
Jonatha de David Sousa Reis, 34, and Bruna Kelly Simoes, 26, talk inside the tent that they currently live in at Princesa Isabel square, in an area known as "cracolandia," or crackland, a dangerous wasteland of about eight blocks in the historic center of Sao Paulo, Brazil, March 9, 2021. After a delay in congressional approval, payments are set to resume this month at an even lower rate. For many, that help is too little, too late. Millions have sunk into poverty since the start of the year. For Reis and Simoes, that meant losing their home. The couple moved into a makeshift tent, strung between two trees, on a public square in crackland this year. "As long as there are no jobs, the emergency payment should have been maintained as it was," Reis, 34, said. "It's been difficult, very difficult," said Reis. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli SEARCH "CRACKLAND PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
NESTLE-COFFEE/FACTORY
RTX75A2A 
September 30, 2019 
Recently-harvested coffee fruits are pictured at a plantation in Tepezonapa, in Veracruz state, Mexico,... 
TEPEZONAPA, Mexico 
Recently-harvested coffee fruits are pictured at a plantation in Tepezonapa 
Recently-harvested coffee fruits are pictured at a plantation in Tepezonapa, in Veracruz state, Mexico, August 14, 2019. Picture taken Agosto 14, 2019. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido 
VENEZUELA-MIGRATION/WOMAN
RTS2ITAC 
June 19, 2019 
Venezuelan migrant Arlene Gerder, 38, poses for a picture with her children Jose, 4, and Dayana, 14,... 
Tumbes, Peru 
The Wider Image: Venezuelan mothers, children in tow, rush to migrate 
Venezuelan migrant Arlene Gerder, 38, poses for a picture with her children Jose, 4, and Dayana, 14, as they wait for a taxi to continue their journey to Pisco, after they processed their documents at the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border service center, on the outskirts of Tumbes, Peru, June 17, 2019. Gerder left Venezuela for first time seven months ago looking for a better future for her children. She is on her way back to Peru after picking up her children from Venezuela. "I am a licensed nurse. I had two jobs in Venezuela with the government, but the money was not enough to support my children." "In Venezuela, my children were not eating well. My daughter, thank God, was studying in a private school that I paid for from (Peru), but my son wasn't. He was in a state school, he is four years old and when I returned, he did not even know the colours." Crying, she said: "I spent two years planning the journey because it's difficult, you never want to leave your country, your family, stability. Nobody wants it, but then one day we no longer had food, and my daughter told me that she was hungry. We had already eaten the little we had to eat and what was left was for the next day, but she told me that she was hungry and I gave her what I had. The next day, I had to wait for God to provide something. " "That day I decided to go with what I had. I left with $130 and some gold jewellery, that was all that I took with me." "My children will suffer, but here they will suffer with a full stomach." REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "MOTHERS REFUGEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS
RTX6S53C 
April 17, 2019 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for... 
CHINCHWAD, India 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science graduate who has been unemployed for one... 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for one year poses during a job fair in Chinchwad, India, February 7, 2019. "These days I am very depressed. Now my age of learning is also passing by. I need to get a job. Each and every day is difficult to pass." Picture taken February 7, 2019. To match Insight INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS-ENGINEERS. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui 
INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS
RTX6QQOE 
March 12, 2019 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for... 
CHINCHWAD, India 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science graduate who has been unemployed for one... 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for one year poses during a job fair in Chinchwad, India, February 7, 2019. "These days I am very depressed. Now my age of learning is also passing by. I need to get a job. Each and every day is difficult to pass." Picture taken February 7, 2019. To match Insight INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS-ENGINEERS. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui 
INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS
RTX6QQNT 
March 12, 2019 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for... 
CHINCHWAD, India 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science graduate who has been unemployed for one... 
Pankaj Kumbhakarn, a 27-year-old Master of Computer Science (MCS) graduate who has been unemployed for one year poses during a job fair in Chinchwad, India, February 7, 2019. "These days I am very depressed. Now my age of learning is also passing by. I need to get a job. Each and every day is difficult to pass." Picture taken February 7, 2019. To match Insight INDIA-ELECTION/JOBS-ENGINEERS. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui 
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/WOMEN
RTX6Q5TI 
March 08, 2019 
Nada Rudwan (L), 27, a graduate of English faculty, takes part in a startup workshop in Gaza City, January... 
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories 
The Wider Image: In Gaza, women walk thin line between hope and despair 
Nada Rudwan (L), 27, a graduate of English faculty, takes part in a startup workshop in Gaza City, January 29, 2019. "It was difficult to find a job, so I thought of doing something I like and that will make me money at the same time," said Rudwan, who posts cooking tutorials to social media platforms under the name "Nada Kitchen". "It is an attempt to beat the physical blockade of Gaza by finding a job that just needs some talent, a camera and internet connection," she added. REUTERS/Samar Abo Elouf SEARCH "ELOUF WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/WOMEN
RTX6Q5SV 
March 08, 2019 
Nada Rudwan (C), 27, a graduate of English faculty, looks at videos of her filmed by her sister Lama... 
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories 
The Wider Image: In Gaza, women walk thin line between hope and despair 
Nada Rudwan (C), 27, a graduate of English faculty, looks at videos of her filmed by her sister Lama Rudwan (R), 22, while cooking, in their home in Gaza City, December 16, 2018. "It was difficult to find a job, so I thought of doing something I like and that will make me money at the same time," said Rudwan, who posts cooking tutorials to social media platforms under the name "Nada Kitchen". "It is an attempt to beat the physical blockade of Gaza by finding a job that just needs some talent, a camera and internet connection," she added. REUTERS/Samar Abo Elouf SEARCH "ELOUF WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
PALESTINIANS-GAZA/WOMEN
RTX6Q5S9 
March 08, 2019 
Amid the poverty and deprivation of the Gaza Strip, Palestinian women struggle to find a taste of normality... 
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories 
The Wider Image: In Gaza, women walk thin line between hope and despair 
Amid the poverty and deprivation of the Gaza Strip, Palestinian women struggle to find a taste of normality that is taken for granted in much of the rest of the world. Nada Rudwan used to work in digital marketing, but as her work slowed - unemployment in Gaza stands at nearly 50 percent - she decided to put her tech skills towards one of her passions: cooking. "It was difficult to find a job, so I thought of doing something I like and that will make me money at the same time," said Rudwan, 27, who posts cooking tutorials to social media platforms under the name "Nada Kitchen". REUTERS/Samar Abo Elouf SEARCH "ELOUF WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: PALESTINIANS-GAZA/WOMEN 
PHILIPPINES-TRAFFIC/
RTX6OQ39 
February 26, 2019 
Janice Sarad, 22, who works for a bank, leaves her neighbourhood to go to work, in Antipolo City, Rizal... 
Antipolo, Philippines 
The Wider Image: Chaos, gridlock a daily ordeal for Manila's commuters 
Janice Sarad, 22, who works for a bank, leaves her neighbourhood to go to work, in Antipolo City, Rizal province, Philippines, November 26, 2018. Sarad leaves her home between 4:30-5:00 a.m., to arrive at her job that starts at 8:30 a.m. "In the morning, it's even more difficult to commute because the pressure not to be late is there. You really have to fight your way in. In the evening, it doesn't matter if you get home late," she said. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH "LOPEZ SARAD" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
NIGERIA-ELECTION/PREVIEW
RTX6MIZN 
February 13, 2019 
Azonmayon Moses, 21-year-old teacher and first time voter, poses for a picture in his classroom in the... 
Lagos, Nigeria 
Azonmayon Moses, 21-year-old teacher and first time voter, poses as he teaches students in the Makoko... 
Azonmayon Moses, 21-year-old teacher and first time voter, poses for a picture in his classroom in the Makoko shanty town built on stilts in a lagoon in Lagos, Nigeria February 4, 2019. He is anxious that who ever becomes president does not order the demolition of the precarious settlement he calls home. Azonmayon said: "He must give us assurance that if we vote for them, that they are not going to do anything to us, they must allow us to stay here safely." But he is no fan of the current president. "Everything is hard in the time of Buhari. To find a job is very difficult, to buy food is very hard for us now so that's why we don't need him now." Picture taken February 4, 2019. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja 
GEORGIA-TKIBULI/MINING
RTS2910L 
December 05, 2018 
Miner David Tsnobiladze, 20, rests in a changing room at the Mindeli mine of Saknakhshiri coal mining... 
TKIBULI, Georgia 
The Wider Image: Georgian mining town offers little alternative to deadly job 
Miner David Tsnobiladze, 20, rests in a changing room at the Mindeli mine of Saknakhshiri coal mining company in Tkibuli, Georgia, July 13, 2018. David has worked at the mine for two years. His father has worked at the mine for 20 years and his grandfather worked there for 34 years. "I always wanted to work at the mine ... It's a difficult job, but interesting as I learn something new every day," said Tsnobiladze. He admits that many other young residents of Tkibuli don't share his attitude. "Many of my peers are unemployed, but still don't want to work at the mine as are either afraid or lazy." REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili SEARCH "GEORGIA MINE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-ELECTION/TAX
RTS2074U 
September 05, 2018 
Ram Pratap who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year, poses for a portrait with his... 
Panipat, India 
The Wider Image: Thousands laid off as India pushes biggest tax reform 
Ram Pratap who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year, poses for a portrait with his wife and daughter inside his house in Panipat in the northern state of Haryana, India, August 24, 2018. After losing his job as an operator, Pratap started working as a clerk and a caretaker at another weaving factory. "I got a room for my family inside the factory. My new boss is a really good man. If he didn't support me, it would be really difficult to stay in this city and survive. I have two kids and I can't afford the rent now," he said. "It's a very bad phase for this industry. Many of my friends have left. Most of them have returned to their villages and some moved to different cities for jobs." Pratap said he used to earn $300 per month and now only earns half of that. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "ABIDI TAX" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-ELECTION/TAX
RTS2074T 
September 05, 2018 
Raj Narayan, who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year, sits inside his tea shop in... 
Panipat, India 
The Wider Image: Thousands laid off as India pushes biggest tax reform 
Raj Narayan, who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year, sits inside his tea shop in Panipat in the northern state of Haryana, India, August 24, 2018. Narayan said he was earning $250 to $300 per month. After losing his job, he opened a tea stall. "I sent my family back to the village because I am not earning like I used to and it was getting very difficult to support them and bear the expenses," Narayan said. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "ABIDI TAX" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-ELECTION/TAX
RTS2074S 
September 05, 2018 
Bharat Lal (L) who lost his job as a powerloom operator at a weaving factory earlier this year and now... 
Panipat, India 
The Wider Image: Thousands laid off as India pushes biggest tax reform 
Bharat Lal (L) who lost his job as a powerloom operator at a weaving factory earlier this year and now works as a clerk, sits inside a factory in Panipat in the northern state of Haryana, India, August 29, 2018. Lal said he was earning $380 and now he earns only $180. "It's really getting very difficult for us to survive now, I have a son who is still in school and I'm really worried about his future. I want to save as much as I can for his studies," Lal said. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "ABIDI TAX" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-ELECTION/TAX
RTS2074L 
September 05, 2018 
Children of Ram Pratap (L), who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year and now works... 
Panipat, India 
The Wider Image: Thousands laid off as India pushes biggest tax reform 
Children of Ram Pratap (L), who lost his job as a powerloom operator earlier this year and now works as a clerk at a weaving factory, study inside a factory in Panipat in the northern state of Haryana, India, August 29, 2018. After losing his job as an operator, Pratap started working as a clerk and a caretaker at another weaving factory. "I got a room for my family inside the factory. My new boss is a really good man. If he didn't support me, it would be really difficult to stay in this city and survive. I have two kids and I can't afford the rent now," he said. "It's a very bad phase for this industry. Many of my friends have left. Most of them have returned to their villages and some moved to different cities for jobs." Pratap said he used to earn $300 per month and now only earns half of that. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "ABIDI TAX" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
VALENTINES-DAY/COUPLES
RTX4W8XF 
February 13, 2018 
Haidar Ali Moracho, 20, and Coral Ibanez Blanco, 23, pose for a picture at the Moor's Field garden (Campo... 
Madrid, Spain 
The Wider Image: Arranged marriage to Facebook: what's your love story? 
Haidar Ali Moracho, 20, and Coral Ibanez Blanco, 23, pose for a picture at the Moor's Field garden (Campo del Moro) in Madrid, Spain, February 7, 2018. Haidar, a transgender young man who's in his second year of Asian and African Studies at Madrid's Autonoma University and Coral, currently looking for a job, have been dating for seven years. "A friend of mine told me there was a girl who liked Dragon Ball's Vegeta character and wanted to become a boy. She put us in touch virtually and we spent the following year video calling each other before we were able to meet in person in Madrid," said Coral. "I wanted to kiss her so badly, but her friend's parents were with us and I refrained myself," said Haidar. "We had to wait a few more months before I was invited to his house and we kissed in his bedroom for the first time, but his family didn't approve of us at first and we spent the following five years seeing each other secretly during Japan Weekend fairs," said Coral. "It was very hard. There were times I thought it would be less painful if we broke up, but I couldn't. Together until death do us part," said Haidar. "We have gone through a lot of difficult times, but now we feel like we can face anything and anyone, no one can bring us down," said Coral. They are both Spanish history buffs and enjoy spending time together at the Moor's Field gardens beneath the Royal Palace. "This place is very meaningful to us because here we feel free," said Coral. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "GLOBAL LOVE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PB1P 
December 11, 2017 
Qi Guangpu of China performs an aerial as he trains during the Snowboarding and Freestyle Skiing World... 
Sierra Nevada, Spain 
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story 
Qi Guangpu of China performs an aerial as he trains during the Snowboarding and Freestyle Skiing World Championships in Sierra Nevada, Spain, March 9, 2017. Paul Hanna: "Photographing sports involves patience, timing, positioning, perseverance - and sheer luck. Knowing how a sport unfolds and how to position oneself to capture the key action moment or emotion is essential. When it comes to winter sports, the job usually involves skiing into position with a heavy backpack carrying all the day's camera gear. A photographer also needs crampons to stop them sliding down into the course from their shooting position. The key to capturing the beauty of freestyle skiing is about getting the images of competitors flipping and twisting their way through the evening sky. The amount of time the competitors spend in the air is impressive. This photo was taken as the sun was setting over the mountains. Capturing the aerial as well as the fading sunset was difficult as there was no vantage point to get the two elements in the same frame. Cables blocked the view to the jumps and my position was too low to capture very high jumps. A small scaffolding tower holding a few cables up became my best bet. Without waiting to see if anyone would object and laden with cameras, I managed to scale the tower and photograph a handful of athletes before the light disappeared. It was not the most comfortable shooting position with one foot wedged between a bar and the other leg wrapped around another bar for support, but it was just for a few minutes. At times, I was also allowed underneath the ramp to shoot pointing straight up as the athletes shot off into the night sky in a spray of snow like stars." REUTERS/Paul Hanna/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PAZ3 
December 11, 2017 
Wildcat gold miner, or garimpeiro, works at a wildcat mine, also known as garimpo, at a deforested area... 
CREPURIZAO, Brazil 
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story 
Wildcat gold miner, or garimpeiro, works at a wildcat mine, also known as garimpo, at a deforested area of Amazon rainforest near Crepurizao, in the municipality of Itaituba, Para State, Brazil, August 6, 2017. Nacho Doce: "This image is meaningful to me for two reasons. The first is the deep fatigue on the face of the young man I was photographing as he turned boulders in his search for gold. The second is that while on the long assignment I fell into a ravine and twisted my ankle. The pain made walking difficult, so while taking pictures of the man I had to sit rather than stand. Working on stories about wildcat gold mining in the Amazon is dangerous. But the hardest part of the whole long assignment was staying with the story until I had what I wanted. The miners live incredibly hard lives. Just to reach them meant travelling 24 hours by bus and eight hours by van and I couldn't reveal the exact place where I was working. Illegal miners have been at work in the Amazon for generations and there is constant tension between them and the big mining companies that have legal contracts. At the end of this assignment, I was happy. The wildcat miners helped me cope with my ankle and I rode home with a pastor who told me he believed in what I was doing. The help and support of the miners while I was working was crucial. To make pictures isn't just an individual thing - it requires a team." REUTERS/Nacho Doce/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/Ê
RTX3AH07 
July 07, 2017 
A combination picture shows a 24-year-old police officer (L), and an 18-year-old student and stone pelter,... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
A combination picture shows a 24-year-old police officer (L), and an 18-year-old student and stone pelter, who both asked to remain anonymous, as they pose for portraits in Kashmir, India, in photos taken May 19, and May 18, 2017. The police officer said: "I joined the police as I had no job. Being part of the police force is very difficult for me under these circumstances but I have no choice. Even our own children and relatives take part in these protests." The protester said: "I will continue stone pelting to fight against Indian oppression in Kashmir. I feel we will achieve our freedom by stone pelting." REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/
RTX3AGZN 
July 07, 2017 
Twenty-five-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
Twenty-five-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India May 19, 2017. "I am the son of a farmer and joined the police as I had no job. We are part of the same society, and using force against children is very difficult for us. We try to exercise maximum restraint Ð that is why we get injured," he said. Picture taken May 19, 2017. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/
RTX3AGZE 
July 07, 2017 
Twenty-four-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
Twenty-four-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India May 19, 2017. "I joined the police as I had no job. Being part of the police force is very difficult for me under these circumstances but I have no choice. Even our own children and relatives take part in these protests," he said. Picture taken May 19, 2017. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/
RTX3AGZC 
July 07, 2017 
Thirty-one-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
Thirty-one-year-old police officer who asked to remain anonymous, poses for a portrait in Kashmir, India May 19, 2017. "I am the son of a farmer. I joined the police as I had no job. We exercise restraint during crowd control. But when they get out of control we have no choice but to use force. It is very difficult to target our own people but it is our job and we have no choice," he said. Picture taken May 19, 2017. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/Ê
RTX3AGZB 
July 07, 2017 
A combination picture shows a 25-year-old police officer (L), and an 18-year-old student and stone pelter,... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
A combination picture shows a 25-year-old police officer (L), and an 18-year-old student and stone pelter, who both asked to remain anonymous, as they pose for portraits in Kashmir, India, in photos taken May 19, and May 20, 2017. The police officer said: "I am the son of a farmer and joined the police as I had no job. We are part of the same society, and using force against children is very difficult for us. We try to exercise maximum restraint Ð that is why we get injured." The protester said: "I was hit by pellets last year during stone pelting and taken to a nearby hospital. There were 48 pellets in my body, out of which 35 were removed and rest are still inside." REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
INDIA-KASHMIR/Ê
RTX3AGYE 
July 07, 2017 
A combination picture shows a 31-year-old police officer (L), and a 19-year-old year old student and... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Kashmir's stone-pelters face off against pellet guns 
A combination picture shows a 31-year-old police officer (L), and a 19-year-old year old student and stone pelter, who both asked to remain anonymous, as they pose for portraits in Kashmir, India, in photos taken May 19, and May 18, 2017. The police officer said: "I am the son of a farmer. I joined the police as I had no job. We exercise restraint during crowd control. But when they get out of control we have no choice but to use force. It is very difficult to target our own people but it is our job and we have no choice." The protester said: "My father is in the police. I feel a stone is a more potent weapon than a gun. We are being forced to resort to violence. I feel violence is the best way to achieve lasting peace." REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "MCNAUGHTON KASHMIR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
USA-IMMIGRATION/FARMERS
RTX35U3Z 
May 14, 2017 
About half of U.S. crop workers are living in the country illegally and more than two-thirds are foreign... 
KING CITY, UNITED STATES 
The Wider Image: Trump reassures farmers about temporary visas 
About half of U.S. crop workers are living in the country illegally and more than two-thirds are foreign born, according to the most recent figures from the U.S. Department of Labor's National Agriculture Workers' Survey. Many farmers say they cannot find U.S. citizens willing and able to do the strenuous jobs they need to fill. The one legal way to bring in seasonal foreign workers is a program known as H-2A, which many farmers complain is overly complex and costly. While use of the program has steadily increased over the past decade, it still accounts for only about 10 percent of the estimated 1.3 million farm workers in the country, according to government data. In California's Central Valley, Steve Scaroni, imports farm laborers from Mexico and Central America for growers using the H-2A program. While many farmers say the H-2A program is difficult to use, Scaroni has embraced it. But he, too, says there are problems. Employers who import workers with H-2A visas must provide free transportation to and from the United States as well as housing and food for workers once they arrive. Wage minimums are set by the government and are often higher than farmers are used to paying. Scaroni, whose company expects to bring in more than 4,000 workers this year on temporary agricultural visas, says he could find work for even more people if he had more places to house them. But affordable housing up to the standard required is difficult to find in California and adds to labor costs, he says. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "H-2A NICHOLSON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching text USA-IMMIGRATION/FARMERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. 
WOMENS-DAY/EGYPT EMPLOYMENT
RTS11Z9G 
March 08, 2017 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Cairo, Egypt 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her workshop in Cairo, Egypt February 27, 2017. Picture taken February 27, 2017. Ousta Asmaa, who started working in this profession by helping her husband in his workshop sends a message to women "That they shouldn't pay attention to those who comment negatively on the work traditionally for men, forget them. Women can do any business no matter how difficult. Do anything you love, do not give up for anyone who wants to discourage you, there are many men saying that women can’t do anything just "cooking and cooking", but women can do the impossible". REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh 
WOMENS-DAY/EGYPT EMPLOYMENT
RTS11Z7M 
March 08, 2017 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Cairo, Egypt 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her workshop in Cairo, Egypt February 27, 2017. Picture taken February 27, 2017. Ousta Asmaa, who started working in this profession by helping her husband in his workshop sends a message to women "That they shouldn't pay attention to those who comment negatively on the work traditionally for men, forget them. Women can do any business no matter how difficult. Do anything you love, do not give up for anyone who wants to discourage you, there are many men saying that women can’t do anything just "cooking and cooking", but women can do the impossible". REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh 
WOMENS-DAY/EGYPT EMPLOYMENT
RTS11Z7I 
March 08, 2017 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Cairo, Egypt 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her workshop in Cairo, Egypt February 27, 2017. Picture taken February 27, 2017. Ousta Asmaa, who started working in this profession by helping her husband in his workshop sends a message to women "That they shouldn't pay attention to those who comment negatively on the work traditionally for men, forget them. Women can do any business no matter how difficult. Do anything you love, do not give up for anyone who wants to discourage you, there are many men saying that women can’t do anything just "cooking and cooking", but women can do the impossible". REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh 
WOMENS-DAY/EGYPT EMPLOYMENT
RTS11Z6W 
March 08, 2017 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Cairo, Egypt 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her... 
Asmaa Megahed, 30 years old, who's known as "Ousta Asmaa", a carpenter and designer, works inside her workshop in Cairo, Egypt February 27, 2017. Picture taken February 27, 2017. Ousta Asmaa, who started working in this profession by helping her husband in his workshop sends a message to women "That they shouldn't pay attention to those who comment negatively on the work traditionally for men, forget them. Women can do any business no matter how difficult. Do anything you love, do not give up for anyone who wants to discourage you, there are many men saying that women can’t do anything just "cooking and cooking", but women can do the impossible". REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh 
WOMENS-DAY/WORKPLACE
RTS114ZJ 
March 02, 2017 
Yanis Reina, 30, a gas station attendant, poses for a photograph at a gas station in Caracas, Venezuela... 
Caracas, Venezuela 
The Wider Image: Women at work around the world 
Yanis Reina, 30, a gas station attendant, poses for a photograph at a gas station in Caracas, Venezuela February 24, 2017. "No doubt this is a job initially intended for men, because you have to be standing on the street all your shift, it is dirty, greasy and there is always a strong gasoline smell. I have to adapt the pants of my uniform because they are men's and make me look weird but I adore my work. My clients are like my relatives, they come here everyday and we chat a couple of minutes while the tank is being filled. They come every day because they feel safer to be served by a woman," Reina said. "With the difficult situation that we have in Venezuela, having a job that covers your expenses is almost a luxury, but beyond that, I'm very proud of my job. I believe that now we, the women, have to be the warriors," Reina said. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "WOMEN WORK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
FRANCE-ELECTION/CHARTRES
RTX309WJ 
February 09, 2017 
Malika Etchekopar-Etchart, 38, unemployed, holds a blackboard with the word "chomage" (unemployment),... 
Chartres, France 
The Wider Image: Scandal deepens election uncertainty in France 
Malika Etchekopar-Etchart, 38, unemployed, holds a blackboard with the word "chomage" (unemployment), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "It's more and more difficult to find a job. A few years back, it was a lot easier." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe SEARCH "ELECTION CHARTRES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
TUNISIA-PROTESTS/
RTX24M7E 
January 29, 2016 
Hamza Nasri ,26, who is a unemployed graduate, holds his degree certificate during his meeting with journalists... 
Kasserine, Tunisia 
Nasri holds his degree certificate during his meeting with journalists inside his house in the impoverished... 
Hamza Nasri ,26, who is a unemployed graduate, holds his degree certificate during his meeting with journalists inside his house in the impoverished Zhor neighborhood of Kasserine, where young people have been demonstrating for jobs since last week, January 29, 2016. "The political and economic situation of Tunisia is going worse to worse, terrorist attacks did not help the improvements. Tourists and investors flee the country for lack of security. My country has invested only on tourism and I think was an error from the beginning though Tunisia possesses other potentials. I lost all hope, I could not even continue my studies, I could not finance them, it is really difficult to find a job. How can I have a hope for myself when I don't see any in my own country". Hamza said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra 
TUNISIA-PROTESTS
RTX24M75 
January 29, 2016 
Hamza Nasri, 26, who is an unemployed graduate, sits as he holds his degree certificate during his meeting... 
Kasserine, Tunisia 
Nasri holds his certificates at his home in Passerine 
Hamza Nasri, 26, who is an unemployed graduate, sits as he holds his degree certificate during his meeting with journalists inside his house in the impoverished Zhor neighborhood of Kasserine, where young people have been demonstrating for jobs since last week, January 29, 2016. "The political and economic situation of Tunisia is going worse to worse, terrorist attacks did not help the improvements. Tourists and investors flee the country for lack of security. My country has invested only on tourism and I think it was an error from the beginning though Tunisia possesses other potentials. I lost all hope, I could not even continue my studies, I could not finance them is really difficult to find a job. How can I have a hope for myself when I don't see any in my own country". Hamza said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra 
INDIA-ECONOMY/SAVINGS
RTX1W0O7 
November 26, 2015 
Commuters walk past a bank sign along a road in New Delhi, India, November 25, 2015. On paper, India's... 
New Delhi, India 
Commuters walk past a bank sign along a road in New Delhi 
Commuters walk past a bank sign along a road in New Delhi, India, November 25, 2015. On paper, India's households have more reason than ever to save. But convincing them that the central bank can keep inflation low is proving difficult, hindering the country's ambitious growth plans. That raises the stakes for Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government, which wants to channel more savings into investments that can generate both growth and jobs, to boost chances of winning a second term after its landslide victory in 2014. Picture taken November 25, 2015. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QV0 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QUF 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QTN 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QT4 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QPK 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QOQ 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
FRANCE-SHOOTING/GERMANY-MERKEL
RTS7QO9 
November 18, 2015 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18,... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor Merkel makes a statement at Chancellery in Berlin 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany November 18, 2015. Merkel defended the decision to cancel a soccer match between Germany and Netherlands on Tuesday evening due to security concerns, just four days after Islamist attacks in Paris killed at least 129 people. "I was just as sad as the millions of fans that the match was cancelled. But the security officials took a responsible decision," Merkel said. "These are difficult decisions, perhaps the most difficult given the conflicting priorities of freedom and security. But yesterday it was right to decide based on security." REUTERS/Soeren Stache
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYL5 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian (R), attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro,... 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian (R), attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYKE 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits to enter a kombi to go home in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits to enter a kombi to go home in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits to enter a kombi to go home in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYKD 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, walks up stairs after a job interview in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Hashemi walks up stairs after a job interview in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, walks up stairs after a job interview in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYKA 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, walks along a street in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Hashemi walks along a street in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, walks along a street in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYIP 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi (C), a Syrian, attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi (C), a Syrian, attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro,... 
Tulin Hashemi (C), a Syrian, attends a Portuguese lesson at the Caminhos Language Centre in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYIO 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits for a job interview at a hotel in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits for a job interview at a hotel in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil... 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, waits for a job interview at a hotel in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYIN 
September 23, 2015 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, chooses vegetables at a market in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, chooses vegetables at a market in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro 
Tulin Hashemi, a Syrian, chooses vegetables at a market in Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (Conare), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BRAZIL
RTX1RYH9 
September 22, 2015 
Syrian Tulin Hashemi poses for a photo along the street she is living in, at the Vidigal slum in Rio... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
Syrian Tulin Hashemi poses for a photo along the street she is living in, at the Vidigal slum in Rio... 
Syrian Tulin Hashemi poses for a photo along the street she is living in, at the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 22, 2015. Tulin, whose mother arrived two days ago, has been living in Brazil for two months. As she does not speak Portuguese, Tulin says it is difficult for her to find a job and therefore she is staying at the slum as it is one of the cheaper neighbourhoods to live in. According to the National Committee for Refugees (CONARE), 2,077 people fleeing the Syrian civil war have settled in Brazil, whilst a quarter of the 8,400 refugees in the Latin American country come from Syria. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
Sort by 
Display 
Items per page 
Page 
of 18