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Search results for: Diminish

In the Headlines
In the Headlines 
In Kabul children's hospital, medics struggle with staff shortages 
21 PICTURES 
INDONESIA-TIN/
RTXD1LC3 
May 01, 2021 
Hendra, a 51-year-old tin miner, sits on a wooden boat with other miners as they head to their pontoons... 
TOBOALI, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Mining tin from the sea 
Hendra, a 51-year-old tin miner, sits on a wooden boat with other miners as they head to their pontoons off the coast of Toboali, on the southern shores of the island of Bangka, Indonesia, May 1, 2021. "On land, our income is diminishing. There are no more reserves," said Hendra, who shifted to work in offshore tin mining about a year ago after a decade in the industry. "In the ocean, there are far more reserves." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "KURNIAWAN TIN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
INDONESIA-TIN/
RTXD1LC4 
April 29, 2021 
Hendra, 51, a tin miner, shows the sand of tin ore on a pontoon off the coast of Toboali, on the southern... 
TOBOALI, Indonesia 
The Wider Image: Mining tin from the sea 
Hendra, 51, a tin miner, shows the sand of tin ore on a pontoon off the coast of Toboali, on the southern shores of the island of Bangka, Indonesia, April 29, 2021. "On land, our income is diminishing. There are no more reserves," said Hendra, who shifted to work in offshore tin mining about a year ago after a decade in the industry. "In the ocean, there are far more reserves." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "KURNIAWAN TIN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7GU0K 
May 01, 2020 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own... 
Dover, UNITED STATES 
Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Cartanza with three-week-old birds from her own current flock during... 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own current flock, plays a role counseling farmers who are facing diminished flocks — or in the most extreme instances are forced to destroy flocks — due to disruptions from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Dover, Delaware, U.S. May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7GU0E 
May 01, 2020 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own... 
Dover, UNITED STATES 
Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Cartanza with three-week-old birds from her own current flock during... 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own current flock, plays a role counseling farmers who are facing diminished flocks — or in the most extreme instances are forced to destroy flocks — due to disruptions from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Dover, Delaware, U.S. May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7GU0F 
May 01, 2020 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own... 
Dover, UNITED STATES 
Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Cartanza with three-week old birds from her own current flock during... 
University of Delaware Poultry Extension Agent Georgie Cartanza, with three-week-old birds from her own current flock, plays a role counseling farmers who are facing diminished flocks — or in the most extreme instances are forced to destroy flocks — due to disruptions from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Dover, Delaware, U.S. May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7E7 
April 23, 2020 
A combination picture shows Li Congchen, 11, posing for a photograph while holding a picture that he... 
Beijing, China 
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most 
A combination picture shows Li Congchen, 11, posing for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China, April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses are beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns." said Li. "I feel that sometimes it?s quite difficult to go out. I?m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home is not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7C2 
April 23, 2020 
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease... 
Beijing, China 
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most 
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China, April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses are beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns." said Li. "I feel that sometimes it?s quite difficult to go out. I?m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home is not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7BC 
April 23, 2020 
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease... 
Beijing, China 
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most 
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns", said Li. "I feel that sometimes it's quite difficult to go out. I’m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home are not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
BRITAIN-EU/HIGHSTREET
RTS2ST7W 
October 25, 2019 
Shop worker Judith Perez talks to a fellow colleague in the charity shop Give a Little, on Streatham... 
London, United Kingdom 
The Wider Image: On a London high street, Brexit fatigue sets in 
Shop worker Judith Perez talks to a fellow colleague in the charity shop Give a Little, on Streatham High Road in south London, Britain, September 10, 2019. Perez, who was born in Spain but has lived in Britain since she was a child, worries that Brexit would diminish the opportunities for younger people who might want to study and work in other European countries. "It's not perfect the euro (zone),of course. There is high unemployment," Perez said. "But you're part of something. I remember how things were here when I first came here. It wasn't great. It's much better now. We are going backwards, not forwards." REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "STREATHAM BREXIT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/TITICACA
RTS2PA6Y 
September 05, 2019 
Oscar Limachi, 48, a member of the local Qewaya community who works as a tour guide on the Lake Titicaca,... 
QEWAYA, Bolivia 
The Wider Image: Lake Titicaca, once considered Andean deity, faces pollution threat 
Oscar Limachi, 48, a member of the local Qewaya community who works as a tour guide on the Lake Titicaca, searches for duck eggs on a natural totora floating island in Qewaya village, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, July 3, 2018. "Totora plants are diminishing, although they are not used much besides hand crafting, they signify much of the lake's ecosystem," said Professor Xavier Lazzaro, an aquatic systems specialist, who has been closely following pollutants in the lake for many years. REUTERS/Manuel Seoane SEARCH "TITICACA CLIMATE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/TITICACA
RTS2PA6O 
September 05, 2019 
Oscar Limachi, 48, a member of the local Qewaya community who works as a tour guide on Lake Titicaca,... 
PARITI ISLAND, Bolivia 
The Wider Image: Lake Titicaca, once considered Andean deity, faces pollution threat 
Oscar Limachi, 48, a member of the local Qewaya community who works as a tour guide on Lake Titicaca, and his son-in-law walk on Pariti island, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, July 3, 2018. Since fish in the lake have become scarce, the population of the island has diminished to just a few families. REUTERS/Manuel Seoane SEARCH "TITICACA CLIMATE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
PAKISTAN-MINORITY/HAZARA
RTS2L01O 
July 04, 2019 
Shaolin Kung Fu Grandmaster Mubarak Ali Shan, poses for a photograph at his office in Mariabad, Quetta,... 
Quetta, Pakistan 
The Wider Image: "Under Siege": Fear and defiance mark life for Pakistan's Hazaras 
Shaolin Kung Fu Grandmaster Mubarak Ali Shan, poses for a photograph at his office in Mariabad, Quetta, Pakistan, June 13, 2019. Many Hazaras have joined the armed forces in Pakistan, where the community's past and future will stay rooted despite any violence, said Mubarak. "We want to serve Pakistan and despite suffering tragedies and incidents, our love for peace has not diminished." REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro SEARCH "HAZARA MINORITY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
Ocean Shock
Ocean Shock 
Portugal mourns sardines' escape to cooler waters 
23 PICTURES 
Environment
Environment 
Rising waters in Carolinas after Florence 
137 PICTURES 
USA-COURT/TEXAS
RTX5X6YA 
April 24, 2018 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez,... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn electoral districts for state legislative and U.S. congressional seats that were thrown out by a lower court for diminishing black and Hispanic voters' clout, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 
USA-COURT/TEXAS
RTX5X6WN 
April 24, 2018 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez,... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn electoral districts for state legislative and U.S. congressional seats that were thrown out by a lower court for diminishing black and Hispanic voters' clout, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 
USA-COURT/TEXAS
RTX5X6W5 
April 24, 2018 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez,... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments 
U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., before the judges hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn electoral districts for state legislative and U.S. congressional seats that were thrown out by a lower court for diminishing black and Hispanic voters' clout, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 
USA-COURT/TEXAS
RTX5X6VV 
April 24, 2018 
Visitors wait in line to attend hearing arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Visitors wait in line to attend hearing arguments in Abbott vs. Perez 
Visitors wait in line to attend hearing arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn electoral districts for state legislative and U.S. congressional seats that were thrown out by a lower court for diminishing black and Hispanic voters' clout, at U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 
USA-COURT/TEXAS
RTX5X6VL 
April 24, 2018 
Visitors wait in line to hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Visitors wait in line to hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez 
Visitors wait in line to hear arguments in Abbott vs. Perez, weighing a bid by Texas to revive Republican-drawn electoral districts for state legislative and U.S. congressional seats that were thrown out by a lower court for diminishing black and Hispanic voters' clout, at U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 
VENEZUELA-GAMBLING/
RTS1IV3H 
November 07, 2017 
"The Whale", "The Dog" or "The Zebra"? Players line up beside a small kiosk in a poor neighbourhood to... 
Caracas, Venezuela 
The Wider Image: Venezuelan crisis spawns boom in gambling 
"The Whale", "The Dog" or "The Zebra"? Players line up beside a small kiosk in a poor neighbourhood to choose animals in a lottery game that has become a craze in Venezuela even as the oil-rich country suffers a fourth year of brutal recession. It seems more and more Venezuelans are turning to gambling in their desperation to make ends meet amid the country's unprecedented economic crisis. Though more people lose than win overall, the illusion of a payday has become more alluring as Venezuelans endure the world's highest inflation, shortages of basics from flour to car batteries, and diminished real-term wages. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "MORAES GAMBLING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: VENEZUELA-GAMBLING/ 
USA-FED/
RTX243IC 
January 26, 2016 
Snow rests on the eagle statue atop the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016. The Federal... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Snow rests on the eagle statue atop the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington 
Snow rests on the eagle statue atop the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016. The Federal Reserve is expected to leave interest rates unchanged on Wednesday and acknowledge that turmoil in financial markets threatens its upbeat view of the U.S. economy, leaving the chances of a March hike diminished but alive. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
USA-FED/
RTX243I9 
January 26, 2016 
A man walks past the snow-covered grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016.... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
A man walks past the snow-covered grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington 
A man walks past the snow-covered grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016. The Federal Reserve is expected to leave interest rates unchanged on Wednesday and acknowledge that turmoil in financial markets threatens its upbeat view of the U.S. economy, leaving the chances of a March hike diminished but alive. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
USA-FED/
RTX243I8 
January 26, 2016 
Snow covers the grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016. The Federal Reserve... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Snow covers the grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington 
Snow covers the grounds of the U.S. Federal Reserve in Washington January 26, 2016. The Federal Reserve is expected to leave interest rates unchanged on Wednesday and acknowledge that turmoil in financial markets threatens its upbeat view of the U.S. economy, leaving the chances of a March hike diminished but alive. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V6A6 
November 21, 2015 
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce, which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned... 
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, is pictured in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. Gilmar said he won't use the river water for the irrigation of his agriculture anymore. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V696 
November 21, 2015 
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton... 
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V68Y 
November 21, 2015 
Gilmar (L), who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce, which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned... 
Gilmar (L), who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, poses with his family in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. Gilmar said he won't use the river water for the irrigation of his agriculture anymore. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V68U 
November 21, 2015 
A resident fishes at Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A resident fishes at Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
A resident fishes at Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V61B 
November 21, 2015 
Birds fly on Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Birds fly on Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in... 
Birds fly on Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BL 
November 21, 2015 
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) lays her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A loggerhead sea turtle lays eggs on the beach in Regencia village 
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) lays her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BJ 
November 21, 2015 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program checks a loggerhead sea turtle after... 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) after it laid eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BI 
November 21, 2015 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program checks a loggerhead sea turtle after... 
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) after it laid eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4AP 
November 21, 2015 
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A loggerhead sea turtle crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach in Regencia village
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers of the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4AA 
November 21, 2015 
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach in Regencia... 
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819O 
November 19, 2015 
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator... 
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819N 
November 19, 2015 
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according... 
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819J 
November 19, 2015 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza reacts as he talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's... 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza reacts as he talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819G 
November 19, 2015 
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where,... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where,... 
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819E 
November 19, 2015 
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819B 
November 19, 2015 
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator... 
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818L 
November 19, 2015 
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental... 
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818K 
November 19, 2015 
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according... 
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818J 
November 19, 2015 
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818F 
November 19, 2015 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
LINHARES, Brazil 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,... 
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76L6 
November 15, 2015 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
NAQUE, Brazil 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Naque, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76L1 
November 15, 2015 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
SANTA CRUZ DO ESCALVADO, Brazil 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa Cruz... 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa Cruz do Escalvado, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76KX 
November 15, 2015 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
SANTA CRUZ DO ESCALVADO, Brazil 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa Cruz... 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa Cruz do Escalvado, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76KV 
November 15, 2015 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
SANTA CRUZ DO ESCALVADO, Brazil 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa... 
A dead fish is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Santa Cruz do Escalvado, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76KT 
November 15, 2015 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
NAQUE, Brazil 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Naque 
A boat is pictured in Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Naque, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76KD 
November 15, 2015 
A general view shows the Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,... 
NAQUE, Brazil 
A general view shows the Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Naque 
A general view shows the Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Naque, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76K7 
November 15, 2015 
Ducks swim on a small arm of Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd... 
GOVERNADOR VALADARES, Brazil 
Ducks swim on a small arm of Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Governador... 
Ducks swim on a small arm of Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Governador Valadares, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76JB 
November 15, 2015 
A duck swims on a small arm of Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd... 
GOVERNADOR VALADARES, Brazil 
A duck swims on a small arm of Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in... 
A duck swims on a small arm of Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Governador Valadares, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS76H8 
November 15, 2015 
Vadilson Moreira Costa stamds on the balcony of his house on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River) after... 
GOVERNADOR VALADARES, Brazil 
Costa is pictured on the balcony of his house on the banks of Rio Doce after a dam, owned by Vale SA... 
Vadilson Moreira Costa stamds on the balcony of his house on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River) after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Governador Valadares, Brazil, November 12, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. Picture taken November 12, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes 
INDIA-BIHAR/
RTS60PX 
November 08, 2015 
Supporters of Congress party celebrate after learning of initial results outside the party office in... 
Ahmedabad, India 
Supporters of Congress party celebrate after learning of initial results outside the party office in... 
Supporters of Congress party celebrate after learning of initial results outside the party office in Ahmedabad, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi suffered a heavy defeat on Sunday in an election in Bihar, India's third most-populous state, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight regional election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. An anti-Modi alliance led by Chief Minister Nitish Kumar was ahead in 179 seats in the 243-seat regional assembly, an overwhelming majority, tallies compiled by the election commission showed. REUTERS/Amit Dave 
INDIA-BIHAR
RTS5ZUM 
November 08, 2015 
A supporter of Janata Dal (United) dances as he celebrates after learning the initial results inside... 
New Delhi, India 
A supporter of Janata Dal (United) dances as he celebrates after learning the initial results inside... 
A supporter of Janata Dal (United) dances as he celebrates after learning the initial results inside the residence of the party leader Sharad Yadav in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-BIHAR
RTS5ZUL 
November 08, 2015 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of... 
New Delhi, India 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of... 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of the party leader Sharad Yadav in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-BIHAR
RTS5ZUI 
November 08, 2015 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of... 
New Delhi, India 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of... 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results inside the residence of the party leader Sharad Yadav in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-BIHAR
RTS5ZU3 
November 08, 2015 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office... 
New Delhi, India 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office... 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-BIHAR
RTS5ZU1 
November 08, 2015 
A woman (L) dances as she takes part in celebrations after learning the initial results inside the residence... 
New Delhi, India 
A woman dances as she takes part in celebrations after learning the initial results inside the residence... 
A woman (L) dances as she takes part in celebrations after learning the initial results inside the residence of Janata Dal (United) leader Sharad Yadav (C) in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-BIHAR/
RTS5ZU0 
November 08, 2015 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office... 
New Delhi, India 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office... 
Supporters of Janata Dal (United) celebrate after learning the initial results outside the party office in New Delhi, India, November 8, 2015. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was heading for a heavy defeat on Sunday in a key election in India's third most populous state Bihar, signalling the waning power of a leader who until recently had an unrivalled reputation as a vote winner. Modi's second straight state election setback will galvanise opposition parties, embolden rivals in his own party and diminish his standing with foreign leaders amid concern he may not win a second term as prime minister. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
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