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Search results for: E-Coli

HEALTH-ROMAINE/
RTS26Z09
November 21, 2018
Romaine lettuce has been taken off the shelf for fear of an E. coli outbreak at this grocery store in...
Toronto, Canada
Romaine lettuce has been taking off the shelf at this grocery store in Toronto, Ontario,
Romaine lettuce has been taken off the shelf for fear of an E. coli outbreak at this grocery store in Toronto, Ontario, Canada November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio
HEALTH-ROMAINE/
RTS26Z06
November 21, 2018
Romaine lettuce has been taken off the shelf for fear of an E. coli outbreak at this grocery store in...
Toronto, Canada
Romaine lettuce has been taking off the shelf at this grocery store in Toronto, Ontario
Romaine lettuce has been taken off the shelf for fear of an E. coli outbreak at this grocery store in Toronto, Ontario, Canada November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio
MYANMAR-ROHINYA/ C
RTX3LBOS
December 04, 2017
Resultados de prueba de contaminación de agua con E.coli en campamentos de refugiados rohinyá. 16 cm...
Myanmar
MYANMAR ROHINYÁ CAMPAMENTOS AG C
Resultados de prueba de contaminación de agua con E.coli en campamentos de refugiados rohinyá. 16 cm de ancho. (SGN03)
CHIPOTLE-RESULTS/ C
RTX2BSFM
April 26, 2016
Share price performance of Chipotle and Panera, with percentage of Chipotle customers trying Panera in...
Chipotle's loss, Panera's gain? eps C
Share price performance of Chipotle and Panera, with percentage of Chipotle customers trying Panera in the aftermath of the E. coli outbreak
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTX1V42N
November 21, 2015
Customers enter a Chipotle restaurant in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for...
Seattle, UNITED STATES
Customers enter a Chipotle restaurant in Seattle, Washington
Customers enter a Chipotle restaurant in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTX1V42L
November 21, 2015
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S....
Seattle, UNITED STATES
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTX1V42F
November 21, 2015
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S....
Seattle, UNITED STATES
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington
A sign on the door of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Seattle, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS8720
November 20, 2015
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS871Z
November 20, 2015
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS871Y
November 20, 2015
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
The sign of a Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS871X
November 20, 2015
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS871Q
November 20, 2015
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
CHIPOTLE-MEXICAN/ECOLI
RTS871P
November 20, 2015
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease...
Federal Way, UNITED STATES
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington
A Chipotle restaurant is shown in Federal Way, Washington November 20, 2015. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday that three additional states reported E. coli infections from the same strain as the Chipotle Mexican Grill outbreak, sending shares in the chain down more than 12 percent. REUTERS/David Ryder
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKQJ
March 04, 2013
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility is pictured in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility is pictured in South Sioux City, Nebraska
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility is pictured in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKQG
March 04, 2013
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters is pictured in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota November 19, 2012....
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters is pictured in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota
The Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters is pictured in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKQB
March 04, 2013
Nick Roth (L), Jennifer Letch (C) and Craig Letch pose for a photograph at Beef Products Inc company...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Nick Roth, Jennifer Letch and Craig Letch pose for a photograph at Beef Products Inc company headquarters...
Nick Roth (L), Jennifer Letch (C) and Craig Letch pose for a photograph at Beef Products Inc company headquarters in Dakota Dunes, South DakotaNovember 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKQ5
March 04, 2013
(Counterclockwise from bottom left) Eldon Roth, founder and CEO of Beef Products Inc (BPI) and his wife...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Eldon Roth, founder and CEO of Beef Products Inc and his wife Regina pose with their son, Nick, son-in-law...
(Counterclockwise from bottom left) Eldon Roth, founder and CEO of Beef Products Inc (BPI) and his wife Regina pose for a photograph with their son, Nick Roth, son-in-law Craig Letch and daughter Jennifer Letch at their company headquarters in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKQ0
March 04, 2013
Jason Gaswint keeps an eye on equipment readings from the Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters operations...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Jason Gaswint keeps an eye on equipment readings from the Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters operations...
Jason Gaswint keeps an eye on equipment readings from the Beef Products Inc (BPI) headquarters operations center in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKPU
March 04, 2013
Edible beef tallow, one of the byproducts of producing lean, finely textured beef (LFTB), is pictured...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Edible beef tallow, one of the byproducts of producing lean, finely textured beef (LFTB), is pictured...
Edible beef tallow, one of the byproducts of producing lean, finely textured beef (LFTB), is pictured at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKPP
March 04, 2013
Tanya Chavez measures a sample of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) for oil, moisture and protein content...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Tanya Chavez measures a sample of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) for oil, moisture and protein content...
Tanya Chavez measures a sample of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) for oil, moisture and protein content at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKPI
March 04, 2013
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKPF
March 04, 2013
Rich Jochum displays a package of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Rich Jochum displays a package of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility...
Rich Jochum displays a package of lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKPD
March 04, 2013
Boneless beef trimmings that average about 70% fat from which lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is created...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Boneless beef trimmings that average about 70% fat from which lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is created...
Boneless beef trimmings that average about 70% fat from which lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is created from is pictured at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKP8
March 04, 2013
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKP7
March 04, 2013
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKP5
March 04, 2013
A plant worker walks through the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
A plant worker walks through the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City
A plant worker walks through the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKP3
March 04, 2013
Plant workers produce lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Plant workers produce lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South...
Plant workers produce lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKOY
March 04, 2013
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKOW
March 04, 2013
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux...
Lean, finely textured beef (LFTB) is produced at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
USA-MEDIA/ABC-BPI/
RTR3EKOU
March 04, 2013
Plant workers walk through the Machine Shop at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City,...
SOUTH SIOUX CITY, UNITED STATES
Plant workers walk through the Machine Shop at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City...
Plant workers walk through the Machine Shop at the Beef Products Inc (BPI) facility in South Sioux City, Nebraska November 19, 2012. A year ago, Beef Products Inc. had four state-of-the art plants, more than 1,300 employees and was expanding aggressively. The meat company was the leading maker of "lean finely textured beef," a low-fat product made from chunks of beef, including trimmings, and exposed to tiny bursts of ammonium hydroxide to kill E. coli and other dangerous contaminants. Few Americans realized the product was a mainstay of fast-food burgers, school lunch tacos and homemade meatloaf. Today, the South Dakota company's revenues have plummeted from more than $650 million to about $130 million a year, and three of its plants are shuttered. Company officials blame the abrupt falloff on a series of ABC News broadcasts that began last March - stories that repeatedly called its product "pink slime." Photo taken November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lane Hickenbottom (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY MEDIA)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR39004
October 10, 2012
XL Foods workers listen to Doug O'Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local...
Brooks, Canada
XL Foods workers listen to O'Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401,...
XL Foods workers listen to Doug O'Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, during a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZY
October 10, 2012
XL Foods workers listen to Doug O'Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local...
Brooks, Canada
XL Foods workers listen to O'Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, during...
XL Foods workers listen to Doug O'Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, during a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZS
October 10, 2012
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
O?Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds news conference in Brooks...
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZQ
October 10, 2012
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
O?Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference in Brooks...
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZN
October 10, 2012
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
O?Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds news conference in Brooks...
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEADSHOT BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZJ
October 10, 2012
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
O?Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds news conference in Brooks...
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZH
October 10, 2012
Workers read a news release from United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401 during a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
Workers read a news release from United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401 during a news conference...
Workers read a news release from United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401 during a news conference in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZZE
October 10, 2012
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference...
Brooks, Canada
O?Halloran, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds news conference in Brooks...
Doug O?Halloran, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, holds a news conference stating that XL Foods are still refusing to address food safety issues flagged by the union in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD BUSINESS)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZYX
October 10, 2012
The XL Foods plant sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from...
Brooks, Canada
XL Foods plant sits idle in Brooks
The XL Foods plant sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZYW
October 10, 2012
The XL Foods plant sits idle behind a cattle fence in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have...
Brooks, Canada
XL Foods plant sits idle behind a cattle fence in Brooks
The XL Foods plant sits idle behind a cattle fence in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZYT
October 10, 2012
Buses that bring workers to the plant remained parked at the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks,...
Brooks, Canada
Buses that bring workers to plant remained parked at the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks
Buses that bring workers to the plant remained parked at the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH FOOD)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZYS
October 10, 2012
A Canadian flag flies over the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten...
Brooks, Canada
Canadian flag flies over the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks
A Canadian flag flies over the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38ZYQ
October 10, 2012
Cattle graze in a field near the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012....
Brooks, Canada
Cattle graze in a field near the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks.
Cattle graze in a field near the XL Foods plant that sits idle in Brooks, Alberta, October 10, 2012. Ten people have now fallen sick from contaminated beef products from the XL Foods plant, health officials said on Saturday. Four previous cases were also in Alberta, and officials say they have evidence that these victims ate meat produced by the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The Canadian officials said the six new cases were caused by the same strain of the E. coli bacteria as the previous cases. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ANIMALS HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RH9
October 03, 2012
Ground Alberta beef is seen before packaging at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012....
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
Ground Alberta beef is seen before packaging at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary
Ground Alberta beef is seen before packaging at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RH7
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, a butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market, works with choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary,...
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
A butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market works with choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, a butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market, works with choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RH5
October 03, 2012
A butcher wraps Ground Alberta beef at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon...
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
A butcher wraps Ground Alberta beef at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary
A butcher wraps Ground Alberta beef at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RH2
October 03, 2012
Ground Alberta beef in seen in coolers at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon...
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
Ground Alberta beef in seen in coolers at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary
Ground Alberta beef in seen in coolers at Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RH0
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, a butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market, organizes choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary,...
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
A butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market organizes choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, a butcher at Bon Ton Meat Market, organizes choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RGU
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, a meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta,...
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI, Canada
A meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, a meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA/
RTR38RGR
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, a meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta,...
Calgary, Canada
Meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, a meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38RFJ
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta,...
Calgary, Canada
Colliou meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, cuts choice cuts of Alberta beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD)
CANADA/
RTR38RFI
October 03, 2012
Clayton Colliou, meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, weighs Alberta ground beef in Calgary, Alberta,...
Calgary, Canada
Clayton Colliou, meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, weighs Alberta ground beef in Calgary
Clayton Colliou, meat cutter at Bon Ton Meat Market, weighs Alberta ground beef in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Bon Ton stated it was not effected by the recent E.Coli outbreak as they get their meat from select smaller producers. E. coli, a strain of which can cause sickness or even death, is widely present in meat-processing plants, and regulators require packers to control the bacteria within certain levels. E.coli can be killed by thoroughly cooking meat. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: FOOD HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R6R
October 03, 2012
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George Da Pont answers questions on the E.Coli outbreak...
Calgary, Canada
Canadian Food Inspection Agency President Da Pont answers questions on the E.Coli outbreak in Canada...
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George Da Pont answers questions on the E.Coli outbreak in Canada during a news conference at the CFIA Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS AGRICULTURE HEALTH)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R34
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (C) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and CFIA President George Da Pont provide an update on the E....
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (C) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George Da Pont (R) provide an update on the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, during a news conference at the CFIA Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R31
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, during a news conference at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE HEADSHOT)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R2Z
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz leaves a news conference after answering questions regarding...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz leaves a news conference after answering questions regarding...
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz leaves a news conference after answering questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R2X
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (R) answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (R) answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (R) answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, during a news conference at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R2W
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (C) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and CFIA President George Da Pont provide an update on the E....
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz (C) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) President George Da Pont (R) provide an update on the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, during a news conference at the CFIA Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38R2V
October 03, 2012
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Calgary, Canada
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada,...
Canada's Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz answers questions regarding the E. Coli outbreak in Canada, during a news conference at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Laboratory in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEALTH FOOD AGRICULTURE HEADSHOT)
CANADA-BEEF/ECOLI
RTR38MLH
September 30, 2012
Alberta Premier Alison Redford arrives to discuss the E. coli outbreak with cattle ranchers at the Bell...
Airdrie, Canada
Alberta Premier Redford arrives to discuss the E. coli outbreak with cattle ranchers at the Bell L ranch...
Alberta Premier Alison Redford arrives to discuss the E. coli outbreak with cattle ranchers at the Bell L ranch near Airdrie, Alberta, September 30, 2012. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Sunday released a list of dozens of products made from beef voluntarily recalled by XL Foods, whose plant in Brooks, Alberta, was temporarily shut by the agency after contaminated beef products sickened several people. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH AGRICULTURE)
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