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Search results for: Euro-2008

ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
FINANZAS-CRISIS2008-EUROPA/ C
RTS21E5H
September 14, 2018
Evolución del porcentaje de ciudadanos europeos que califican la economía de su país como buena, mala...
FINANZAS CRISIS2008 EURO C
Evolución del porcentaje de ciudadanos europeos que califican la economía de su país como buena, mala o no saben. 17 cm de ancho. (SGN07)
GRECE-ENERGIE-CRISE/.FC
RTX34KDR
April 07, 2017
Evolution des arriérés de paiement sur les factures de services publics en Grèce et dans la zone euro...
Greece
GRECE ENERGIE CRISE EPS.FC
Evolution des arriérés de paiement sur les factures de services publics en Grèce et dans la zone euro depuis 2008 et évolution des fraudes au compteur électrique commises par des foyers grecs depuis 2012
SPAIN-CULTURE/TAPESTRY
RTSS28Q
October 13, 2016
A centuries-old tapestry factory in Spain has come back from the brink of bankruptcy after an injection...
Madrid, Spain
The Wider Image: Historic weaving revived in Madrid
A centuries-old tapestry factory in Spain has come back from the brink of bankruptcy after an injection of public money, a debt restructuring plan and its biggest order in 200 years - a German commission for dozens of tapestries. The turnaround of the 296-year-old Royal Tapestry Factory in Madrid is a rare bright spot for Spanish companies facing insolvency. Nearly 50,000 businesses have entered administration since the start of the country's economic downturn in 2008. The market for hand-woven tapestries and rugs plummeted during Spain's financial crisis, with key clients like the government crippled by spending cuts. Just one square metre costs thousands of euros and months of skilled work to weave, depending on the amount of silk, wool and gold and silver thread used in a process that has barely changed since the 18th century. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "VERA TAPESTRY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: SPAIN-CULTURE/TAPESTRY
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH9R
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (L) and his lawyer David Koubbi (R) arrives at the courthouse in Paris,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrives at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (L) and his lawyer David Koubbi (R) arrives at the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH8P
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH88
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH86
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (2ndR), his lawyers David Koubbi (C) and Benoit Pruvost (R) leave the courthouse...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel, his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost leave the courthouse in Paris...
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (2ndR), his lawyers David Koubbi (C) and Benoit Pruvost (R) leave the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH7N
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH7K
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH7J
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH6Q
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH6N
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (L) and his lawyer David Koubbi (C) arrives at the courthouse in Paris,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrives at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (L) and his lawyer David Koubbi (C) arrives at the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH65
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH64
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH5Z
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH5V
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/INVESTIGATION
RTSBH5B
March 21, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, March 21, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XRV
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XNO
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (C) and his lawyers speak together inside the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers speak together inside the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (C) and his lawyers speak together inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XN8
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi speaks arrive at the courthouse in Paris,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi speaks arrive at the courthouse in Paris...
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi speaks arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XN6
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers leave the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016....
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers leave the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers leave the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XMA
January 18, 2016
Journalists surround former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi (L) arrive at the courthouse...
Paris, France
Journalists surround former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse...
Journalists surround former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi (L) arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XJR
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) react as they...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) react as they walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XJ5
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. ...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XIQ
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) react as they...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) react as they walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XIH
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. ...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel smokes as he leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XB3
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22XB2
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22X8A
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi (L) walk past gendarmes as they leave a...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi (L) walk past gendarmes as they leave a court at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22X7I
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22X4Q
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leave the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel leaves the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22X3M
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C Rear) walk inside...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C Rear) walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22X3B
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) walk inside...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost leave a court in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (C) walk inside the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WM7
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer Benoit Pruvost (L Rear) arrive at the courthouse in Paris,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer Benoit Pruvost arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer Benoit Pruvost (L Rear) arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WJ4
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WI1
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WF6
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (C) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (R) arrive at the...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyers David Koubbi and Benoit Pruvost arrive at the courthouse...
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (C) and his lawyers David Koubbi (L) and Benoit Pruvost (R) arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WEY
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WEA
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
SOCGEN-KERVIEL/
RTX22WE2
January 18, 2016
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France,...
Paris, France
Former trader Jerome Kerviel and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris
Former trader Jerome Kerviel (R) and his lawyer David Koubbi arrive at the courthouse in Paris, France, January 18, 2016. Kerviel was convicted in 2008 after losing Societe Generale 4.9 billion euros ($6.4 billion) with a pileup of trades that went wrong. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
OSTERREICHI-POST-OUTLOOK/
RTR4T22U
March 12, 2015
Austrian Post Chief Executive Georg Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian...
Vienna, Austria
Austrian Post Chief Executive Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna
Austrian Post Chief Executive Georg Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian Post is targeting a 1-2 percent rise in revenue this year, and an increase in operating profit, it said on Thursday. It proposed a dividend of 1.95 euros per share for the 2014 business year, its highest since 2008 as growth in its parcel and logistics business more than offset a drop in its mail segment last year. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS)
OSTERREICHI-POST-OUTLOOK/
RTR4T21X
March 12, 2015
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian...
Vienna, Austria
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian Post is targeting a 1-2 percent rise in revenue this year, and an increase in operating profit, it said on Thursday. It proposed a dividend of 1.95 euros per share for the 2014 business year, its highest since 2008 as growth in its parcel and logistics business more than offset a drop in its mail segment last year. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO)
OSTERREICHI-POST-OUTLOOK/
RTR4T21W
March 12, 2015
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian...
Vienna, Austria
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna
The logo of Austrian Post is pictured on the rooftop of its headquarters in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian Post is targeting a 1-2 percent rise in revenue this year, and an increase in operating profit, it said on Thursday. It proposed a dividend of 1.95 euros per share for the 2014 business year, its highest since 2008 as growth in its parcel and logistics business more than offset a drop in its mail segment last year. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO)
OSTERREICHI-POST-OUTLOOK/
RTR4T21T
March 12, 2015
Austrian Post Chief Executive Georg Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian...
Vienna, Austria
Austrian Post Chief Executive Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna
Austrian Post Chief Executive Georg Poelzl addresses a news conference in Vienna March 12, 2015. Austrian Post is targeting a 1-2 percent rise in revenue this year, and an increase in operating profit, it said on Thursday. It proposed a dividend of 1.95 euros per share for the 2014 business year, its highest since 2008 as growth in its parcel and logistics business more than offset a drop in its mail segment last year. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO)
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