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Search results for: Excrement

PERU/
RTR2SLCL 
October 13, 2011 
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island 
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
PERU/
RTR2SL64 
October 12, 2011 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL5V 
October 12, 2011 
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11,... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 11, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
PERU/
RTR2SL5P 
October 12, 2011 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE ANIMALS SOCIETY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE: ALSO SEE GF2E95H1KNW01. 
PERU/
RTR2SL5M 
October 12, 2011 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE SOCIETY) 
PERU/
RTR2SL5K 
October 12, 2011 
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 12, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island 
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 12, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE SOCIETY) 
PERU/
RTR2SL5B 
October 12, 2011 
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8,... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island 
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE) 
PERU/
RTR2SL59 
October 12, 2011 
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island,... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island 
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL56 
October 12, 2011 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
PERU/
RTR2SL4Y 
October 12, 2011 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas,... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL4X 
October 12, 2011 
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011.... 
Paracas, Peru 
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL4U 
October 12, 2011 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island 
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL41 
October 12, 2011 
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas,... 
Paracas, Peru 
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island 
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT) 
PERU/
RTR2SL3Y 
October 12, 2011 
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands... 
Paracas, Peru 
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island 
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) 
PERU/
RTR2SL3P 
October 12, 2011 
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October... 
Paracas, Peru 
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island 
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) 
PERU/
RTXZR6S 
October 08, 2011 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other... 
Pisco, Peru 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima 
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE 
BRAZIL/
RTR2RLKH 
September 20, 2011 
A man carries fake excrement on his head during a protest against corruption in downtown Rio de Janeiro... 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 
A man carries fake excrement on his head during a protest against corruption in downtown Rio de Janeiro... 
A man carries fake excrement on his head during a protest against corruption in downtown Rio de Janeiro September 20, 2011. Civil society groups organized the protest through social networking sites against what they said is corruption and the misuse of public funds by ministries in Brazil. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST) 
SUDAN/
RTXWRVP 
January 19, 2011 
A boy from the cattle herding Mundari tribe collects cow excrement in a settlement near Terekeka, Central... 
TEREKEKA, Sudan 
Boy from the cattle herding Mundari tribe collects cow excrement in a settlement near Terekeka 
A boy from the cattle herding Mundari tribe collects cow excrement in a settlement near Terekeka, Central Equatoria state, south Sudan January 19, 2011. South Sudanese voted overwhelmingly to declare independence from the north in a referendum, according to officials in seven out of the region's ten states polled by Reuters on Wednesday. Referendum officials reported large votes in favour of independence -- some releasing early figures, some saying trends pointed to support of more than 90 percent -- in the southern state of Central Equatoria. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (SUDAN - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
AUSTRALIA-ICECREAM/
RTXA0S0 
October 29, 2008 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter row has broken... 
Sydney, Australia 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter row has broken out between one of Sydney's largest tourist pubs and a family of five who accused chefs of serving human excrement in their gelato after they complained about noise during a football match. The tainted sweet was allegedly served up at the Coogee Bay Hotel, one of Sydney's largest and most popular beachfront hotels, located just a few minutes south of Bondi Beach. The pub has denied serving excrement to the Whyte family after they complained they were unable to hear a televised football game due to loud music, with both the chef and restaurant manager volunteering for DNA tests to prove their innocence. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA) 
AUSTRALIA-ICECREAM/
RTXA0RZ 
October 29, 2008 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter row has broken... 
Sydney, Australia 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney 
Traffic drives past the front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter row has broken out between one of Sydney's largest tourist pubs and a family of five who accused chefs of serving human excrement in their gelato after they complained about noise during a football match. The tainted sweet was allegedly served up at the Coogee Bay Hotel, one of Sydney's largest and most popular beachfront hotels, located just a few minutes south of Bondi Beach. The pub has denied serving excrement to the Whyte family after they complained they were unable to hear a televised football game due to loud music, with both the chef and restaurant manager volunteering for DNA tests to prove their innocence. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA) 
AUSTRALIA-ICECREAM/
RTXA0RW 
October 29, 2008 
Two pedestrians walk across the road in front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter... 
Sydney, Australia 
Pedestrians walk across the road in front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney 
Two pedestrians walk across the road in front of the Coogee Bay Hotel in Sydney October 29, 2008. A bitter row has broken out between one of Sydney's largest tourist pubs and a family of five who accused chefs of serving human excrement in their gelato after they complained about noise during a football match. The tainted sweet was allegedly served up at the Coogee Bay Hotel, one of Sydney's largest and most popular beachfront hotels, located just a few minutes south of Bondi Beach. The pub has denied serving excrement to the Whyte family after they complained they were unable to hear a televised football game due to loud music, with both the chef and restaurant manager volunteering for DNA tests to prove their innocence. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA) 
KOREA-PROTESTS/
RTX6W32 
June 13, 2008 
Policemen block high school students demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential... 
Seoul, South Korea 
Policemen block high school students demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential... 
Policemen block high school students demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential Blue House during a candle-light rally to demand full-scale renegotiation of a beef deal with the U.S. and the resignation of President Lee Myung-bak in central Seoul June 13, 2008. Thousands of people participated in the rally after widespread South Korean concern over mad-cow disease in U.S. beef quickly became the lightning rod for a wide range of grievances against Lee's government. The Korean characters read,"It is safer that we eat the excrement of U.S. President George W. Bush". REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA) 
KOREA-PROTESTS/
RTX6W2W 
June 13, 2008 
Policemen block a high school student demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential... 
Seoul, South Korea 
Policemen block a high school student demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential... 
Policemen block a high school student demonstrating on the road leading to the U.S. embassy and the presidential Blue House during a candle-light rally to demand full-scale renegotiation of a beef deal with the U.S. and the resignation of President Lee Myung-bak in central Seoul June 13, 2008. Thousands of people participated in the rally after widespread South Korean concern over mad-cow disease in U.S. beef quickly became the lightning rod for a wide range of grievances against Lee's government. The Korean characters read,"It is safer that we rather eat excrement of (George W.) Bush (of U.S. President)". REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA) 
HORSERACING-MELBOURNE/
RTX2T 
November 06, 2007 
A race-goer wearing fake excrement attends the Melbourne Cup at Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne November... 
Melbourne, Australia 
A race-goer wearing fake excrement attends Melbourne Cup at Flemington Racecourse 
A race-goer wearing fake excrement attends the Melbourne Cup at Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne November 6, 2007. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas (AUSTRALIA) 
SINGAPORE/
RTR1Q7QX 
May 29, 2007 
An Olive-backed Sunbird, Nectarina jugularis, removes the excrement from its two-week-old nestling in... 
Singapore, Singapore 
An Olive-backed Sunbird, Nectarina jugularis, removes the excrement from its two-week-old nestling in... 
An Olive-backed Sunbird, Nectarina jugularis, removes the excrement from its two-week-old nestling in its nest build at a balcony of a condominium in Singapore, May 29, 2007. The Olive-backed Sunbird is very bold and often builds nests close to and even in human habitation and it is among the most common Sunbirds in this region, according to a
Singapore Nature Society. REUTERS/David Loh (SINGAPORE) 
KENYA-BRITISH-MURDER
RTR1K2NJ 
December 05, 2006 
Millionaire hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
British national John Ward speaks to Reuters during interview at his hotel room in Nairobi 
Millionaire hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's Maasai Mara Game Reserve in September 1988, speaks to Reuters during an interview at his hotel room in Nairobi December 5, 2006. Ward, who has made over 100 trips and spent more than 1 million pounds, said on Tuesday that a pile of excrement found at the scene could hold the key to the killers. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna (KENYA) 
KENYA-BRITISH-MURDER/
RTR1K2MZ 
December 05, 2006 
Millionair hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
British national John Ward speaks to Reuters during interview at his hotel room in Nairobi 
Millionair hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's Maasai Mara Game Reserve in September 1988, speaks to Reuters during an interview at his hotel room in Nairobi, December 5, 2006. Ward, who has made over 100 trips and spent more than 1 million pounds, said on Tuesday that a pile of excrement found at the scene could hold the key to the killers. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna (KENYA) 
KENYA-BRITISH-MURDER/
RTR1K2MJ 
December 05, 2006 
Millionair hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
British national John Ward speaks to Reuters during interview at his hotel room in Nairobi 
Millionair hotelier John Ward of Britain, 72, father of Julie Ward who was found murdered in Kenya's Maasai Mara Game Reserve in September 1988, speaks to Reuters during an interview at his hotel room in Nairobi, December 5, 2006. Ward, who has made over 100 trips and spent more than 1 million pounds, said on Tuesday that a pile of excrement found at the scene could hold the key to the killers. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna (KENYA) 
GERMANY
RTR1IJWX 
October 21, 2006 
German right-wing protestors pass a sign stuck into dog excrement which reads 'Tegel Says Nazis Out'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German right-wing protestors pass a sign stuck into dog excrement which reads 'Tegel Says Nazis Out'... 
German right-wing protestors pass a sign stuck into dog excrement which reads 'Tegel Says Nazis Out' during a demonstration in Berlin October 21, 2006. Around 750 right-wing prostestors took part in a German National Democratic Party ( NPD) demontration to demand the release of an arrested band singer. Tegel is a district of Berlin. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz (GERMANY) 
RIGHTS LATVIA GAY
RTR1G6Z1 
August 08, 2006 
Protesters shout slogans at the Reval Hotel Latvia in Riga, Latvia, July 22, 2006 where "Riga Pride 2006"... 
Latvia, Latvia 
Protesters shout slogans at Reval Hotel Latvia in Riga 
Protesters shout slogans at the Reval Hotel Latvia in Riga, Latvia, July 22, 2006 where "Riga Pride 2006" participants gathered for a meeting. Gay pride participants said they were pelted with eggs and bags of excrement on Saturday as they left a service at the Anglican Lutheran church in the old town of the Latvian capital Riga. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins (LATVIA) 
RIGHTS LATVIA GAY
RTR1G6Z0 
August 08, 2006 
A police officer restrains a protester at the Reval Hotel in Riga, Latvia July 22, 2006 where ?Latvia... 
Riga, Latvia 
A police officer restrains a protester at the Reval Hotel in Riga 
A police officer restrains a protester at the Reval Hotel in Riga, Latvia July 22, 2006 where ?Latvia Pride - Riga Pride 2006? participants gathered for a meeting. Gay pride participants said they were pelted with eggs and bags of excrement on Saturday as they left a service at the Anglican Lutheran church in the old town of the Latvian capital Riga. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins (LATVIA) 
RIGHTS RIGA GAY
RTR1G6YZ 
August 08, 2006 
Police officers restrain a protester outside the Reval Hotel in Riga, Latvia July 22, 2006 where ?Latvia... 
Riga, Latvia 
Police officers restrain a protester outside the Reval Hotel in Riga 
Police officers restrain a protester outside the Reval Hotel in Riga, Latvia July 22, 2006 where ?Latvia Pride - Riga Pride 2006? participants gathered for a meeting. Gay pride participants said they were pelted with eggs and bags of excrement on Saturday as they left a service at the Anglican Lutheran church in the old town of the Latvian capital Riga. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins (LATVIA) 
KENYA
RTXNZYZ 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu carries buckets full of excrement on... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu carries buckets full of excrement ..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu carries buckets full of excrement on a narrow street in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYY 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river of sewerage in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYX 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in the Kibera... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in the ..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYW 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu pulls a cart with a drum full of excrement... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu pulls a cart with a drum full of e..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu pulls a cart with a drum full of excrement past a butcher's shop in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYV 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri dumps a bucket of excrement in the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri dumps a bucket of excrement in th..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri dumps a bucket of excrement in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYU 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri prepare to carry buckets of excrement... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri prepare to carry buckets of excr..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri prepare to carry buckets of excrement in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYT 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load buckets... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load b..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05-Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load buckets of excrement into a drum on a street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYR 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement on a muddy street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXNZYQ 
November 30, 2005 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull ..... 
-PHOTO TAKEN 25NOV05- Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement in front of a vegetable shop on a street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXO0AS 
November 26, 2005 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles)... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 mil..... 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTXO0AR 
November 26, 2005 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles)... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 ..... 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. 
KENYA
RTR1BSIF 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu carries buckets full of excrement on a narrow street in the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller carries buckets full of excrement on a narrow street in Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu carries buckets full of excrement on a narrow street in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSID 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river of sewerage in the Kibera... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river of sewerage in Kenya 
Kenyan slum dwellers watch as a drum of excrement is being dumped into a river of sewerage in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSIA 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles)... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in Kenya 
Kenyan slum dwellers dump a drum of excrement into a river of sewerage in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSI8 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu pulls a cart with a drum full of excrement past a butcher's... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller pulls a cart with a drum full of excrement past a butcher's shop in Kenya... 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Patrick Mburu pulls a cart with a drum full of excrement past a butcher's shop in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSI6 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri dumps a bucket of excrement in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller dumps a bucket of excrement in Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri dumps a bucket of excrement in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSI4 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri prepare to carry buckets of excrement in the Kibera slums,... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller prepare to carry buckets of excrement in Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dweller Jackson Muiruri prepare to carry buckets of excrement in the Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSI1 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load buckets of excrement into... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load buckets of excrement into... 
Kenyan 'frogger' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) load buckets of excrement into a drum on a street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSHV 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller pull a drum loaded with excrement in front of a vegetable shop in Kenya... 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement in front of a vegetable shop on a street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BSFX 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers pull a drum loaded with excrement on a muddy street in Kenya 
Kenyan 'froggers' slum dwellers Patrick Mburu (L) and Jackson Muiruri (R) pull a drum loaded with excrement on a muddy street of Kibera slum, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BO6A 
November 25, 2005 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles)... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Kenyan slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums 
Kenyan "frogger" slum dwellers carry buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
KENYA
RTR1BO39 
November 25, 2005 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles)... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in sprawling Kibera slums 
A Kenyan "frogger" slum dweller carries buckets of excrement in the sprawling Kibera slums, 5 km (3 miles) south-east of city centre Nairobi, November 25, 2005. The Kibera slums are the most populated informal settlement in East Africa, housing more than one quarter of Nairobi's population. There is an average of one pit latrine for every 50 to 500 people. Froggers are employed to manually clean out the sludge from latrines but they often have no protection when doing their job and suffer various illnesses as a result. Froggers are stigmatized by their community because of their job and are often threatened as they work. Picture taken November 25, 2005. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna 
INDIA
RTR1ASND 
November 11, 2005 
A scientist (R) of the Wild Life Department takes blood and excrement samples from a duck of Sukhana... 
Chandigarh, India 
A scientist takes blood and excrement samples from a duck in India 
A scientist (R) of the Wild Life Department takes blood and excrement samples from a duck of Sukhana Lake in the northern city of Chandigarh, India November 11, 2005. Japan has approved importing poultry from India for the first time as Asia's leading poultry buyer seeks alternatives because of bird flu outbreaks in other countries, an Indian poultry trade official said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Ajay verma 
SOUTH KOREA
RTXNWY8 
October 27, 2005 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean... 
Seoul, South Korea 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korea..... 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean concerns about how safe it is to eat kimchi are growing even though authorities banned imports of the spicy pickled dish from [China last week because they may contain parasites found in human excrement.] 
SOUTH KOREA
RTXNWY7 
October 27, 2005 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean... 
Seoul, South Korea 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Kore..... 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean concerns about how safe it is to eat kimchi are growing even though authorities banned imports of the spicy pickled dish from [China last week because they may contain parasites found in human excrement.] 
KOREA CHINA KIMCHI
RTR1A7WO 
October 27, 2005 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean... 
Seoul, Korea 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul 
A South Korean man picks up a pack of helminthic at a pharmacy in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean concerns about how safe it is to eat kimchi are growing even though authorities banned imports of the spicy pickled dish from China last week because they may contain parasites found in human excrement. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won 
KOREA CHINA KIMCHI
RTR1A75K 
October 27, 2005 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean... 
Seoul, Korea 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul 
A man walks past South Korean cabbages displayed at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean concerns about how safe it is to eat kimchi are growing even though authorities banned imports of the spicy pickled dish from China last week because they may contain parasites found in human excrement. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won 
KOREA CHINA KIMCHI
RTR1A758 
October 27, 2005 
A merchant arranges domestic kimchi made with South Korean cabbages at a market in Seoul October 27,... 
Seoul, Korea 
A merchant arranges domestic kimchi made with South Korean cabbages at a market in Seoul 
A merchant arranges domestic kimchi made with South Korean cabbages at a market in Seoul October 27, 2005. South Korean concerns about how safe it is to eat kimchi are growing even though authorities banned imports of the spicy pickled dish from China last week because they may contain parasites found in human excrement. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won 
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