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Search results for: Fetish

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-NIGHTLIFE
RTS39FD1
May 29, 2020
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok, Thailand, May 22, 2020. Picture taken May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Matthew Tostevin
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-NIGHTLIFE
RTS39FCZ
May 29, 2020
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok,...
Bangkok, Thailand
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok
Fetish show performer May performs at the BarBar fetish bar in Patpong nightlife district in Bangkok, Thailand, May 22, 2020. Picture taken May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Matthew Tostevin
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R5AN
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4WZ
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4W3
May 13, 2018
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4W1
May 13, 2018
A couple poses at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A couple poses at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4W0
May 13, 2018
A model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VZ
May 13, 2018
Performers attend a show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Performers attend a show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VY
May 13, 2018
People attend the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
People attend the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VQ
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VN
May 13, 2018
A visitor poses at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A visitor poses at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VL
May 13, 2018
A model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VJ
May 13, 2018
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VI
May 13, 2018
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Models attend a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4VG
May 13, 2018
A tattooed model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018....
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A tattooed model attends a fashion show at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4US
May 13, 2018
A performer try a mask at the fair of the "German Fetish Ball" event in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018....
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A performer try a mask at the fair of the "German Fetish Ball" event in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UQ
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UO
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UN
May 13, 2018
A visitor closes the trunk of his car at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018....
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A visitor closes the trunk of his car at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UM
May 13, 2018
A model looks at collars at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A model looks at collars at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UL
May 13, 2018
A visitor poses at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A visitor poses at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UK
May 13, 2018
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors pose at the "German Fetish Ball" fair in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4UJ
May 13, 2018
A couple takes a selfie at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
A couple takes a selfie at the "German Fetish Ball" in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
GERMANY-FETISH/
RTS1R4U8
May 13, 2018
Visitors at the "German Fetish Ball" fair try on a mask, in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal...
Berlin, Germany
German Fetish Ball in Berlin
Visitors at the "German Fetish Ball" fair try on a mask, in Berlin, Germany, May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
BRITAIN-ART/NEONCAFE
RTS17081
June 14, 2017
A neon sign that reads 'Fetish' forms part of an artwork exhibited in God's Own Junkyard gallery and...
London, United Kingdom
A neon sign that reads 'Fetish' forms part of an artwork exhibited in God's Own Junkyard gallery and...
A neon sign that reads 'Fetish' forms part of an artwork exhibited in God's Own Junkyard gallery and cafe in London, Britain, May 13, 2017. Picture taken May 13, 2017. REUTERS/Russell Boyce
Wider Image
Wider Image
Flesh on the hook
15 PICTURES
A picture and its story
A picture and its story
Voodoo festival of Benin
22 PICTURES
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J8X
January 22, 2016
People watch as traditional drummers perform at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
People watch as traditional drummers perform at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J8V
January 22, 2016
Voodoo priests walk through the Kpasse shrine as they celebrate the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
Voodoo priests walk through the Kpasse shrine as they celebrate the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J8C
January 22, 2016
A statue is seen at the Kpasse shrine as voodoo devotees celebrate annual voodoo festival in Ouidah,...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A statue is seen at the Kpasse shrine as voodoo devotees celebrate annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J87
January 22, 2016
A voodoo shrine is seen along a street during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A voodoo shrine is seen along a street during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J82
January 22, 2016
Devotees are seen at the entrance of a shrine in Kpasse forest as they celebrate the annual voodoo festival...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
Devotees are seen at the entrance of a shrine in Kpasse forest as they celebrate the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23J7I
January 22, 2016
A statue is seen at the Kpasse shrine as voodoo devotess celebrate the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A statue is seen at the Kpasse shrine as voodoo devotess celebrate the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with powder and palm oil. Some find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. ATTENTION EDITORS A PICTURE AND ITS STORY “VOODOO FESTIVAL OF BENIN" FOR MORE IMAGES SEARCH “AKINTUNDE VOODOO". REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I5K
January 22, 2016
A masquerade dancer is seen during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A masquerade dancer is seen during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I5D
January 22, 2016
A devotee holds up a ram before killing it as a sacrifice in front of a shrine at the annual voodoo festival...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee holds up a ram before killing it as a sacrifice in front of a shrine at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I5B
January 22, 2016
A devotee is guided by voodoo priests as she goes into a trance at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah,...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee is guided by voodoo priests as she goes into a trance at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I52
January 22, 2016
Devotees kill a goat as a sacrifice at a shrine during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
Devotees kill a goat as a sacrifice at a shrine during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I4J
January 22, 2016
A devotee holds a voodoo doll during a traditional street procession to a shrine at the annual voodoo...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee holds a voodoo doll during a traditional street procession to a shrine at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I4H
January 22, 2016
A mask of a masquerade dancer is seen during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10,...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A mask of a masquerade dancer is seen during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I4F
January 22, 2016
Locally made brooms are displayed for sale by the side of a building in Ouidah, Benin January 10, 2016....
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
Locally made brooms are displayed for sale by the side of a building in Ouidah, Benin January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I4E
January 22, 2016
A carved door is seen at the entrance of a building in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah,...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A carved door is seen at the entrance of a building in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I4A
January 22, 2016
A knife is seen beside a bowl containing blood after a ram was killed as a sacrifice in front of a shrine...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A knife is seen beside a bowl containing blood after a ram was killed as a sacrifice in front of a shrine at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I49
January 22, 2016
A devotee holds down a ram with his foot after killing it as a sacrifice in front of a shrine at the...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee holds down a ram with his foot after killing it as a sacrifice in front of a shrine at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I47
January 22, 2016
A devotee dances during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee dances during the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I44
January 22, 2016
A devotee attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I43
January 22, 2016
A voodoo priest attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A voodoo priest attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I40
January 22, 2016
Devotees perform at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
Devotees perform at the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I3Z
January 22, 2016
A devotee attends the annual voodo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A devotee attends the annual voodo festival in Ouidah in Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
BENIN-POLITICS/
RTX23I3W
January 22, 2016
A voodoo priest attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small...
Ouidah, Benin
A Picture And Its Story: Voodoo festival of Benin
A voodoo priest attends the annual voodoo festival in Ouidah, Benin, January 10, 2016. In Ouidah, a small town and former slave port in the West African country of Benin, the annual voodoo festival gathers visitors from far and wide. It's a week that brings together priests and dignitaries, rich and poor, locals and visitors from as far afield as the Caribbean and France. The festival commemorates the estimated 60 million people who lost their homelands and their freedom during the African slave trade. Slaves were transported from the port town on the Atlantic from Nigeria, Togo, Ghana and other parts of West Africa. The traditional African religion of voodoo, which spread to the Americas with the slave trade, combines elements including philosophy and medicine. The central belief of voodoo is that everything is spirit, including humans. Voodoo is closely related to other belief systems and religions I have seen across Africa, especially back home in Nigeria. The annual Ouidah gathering on 10 January has been a national holiday in Benin for more than 20 years. The gathering includes traditional dance and animal sacrifices at shrines, with some devotees entering trance states. The peak of the festival is in the last two days. Devotees offer dances to the spirits, often with bodies decorated with local powder and palm oil. There are those who find the initiation ceremonies of voodoo, the animal sacrifices, the bloodletting and the use of fetishes unsettling. Although many voodoo practices have been modified over the years, I have heard people, especially those who follow Christianity and Islam, voice their doubts. Whatever your opinion of voodoo, it's hard to ignore the energy and devotion of its followers at a gathering like this. The Ouidah festival looks set to remain a regular fixture in Benin's religious and cultural calendar. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ6L
January 30, 2015
The Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX...
The Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ6H
January 30, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, is seen next to...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, is seen next to...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, is seen next to a canal in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ6F
January 30, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen next to farm fields in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards."REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL AGRICULTURE)
NFL-SUPER
RTR4NJ69
January 30, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen behind an unfinished housing subdivision in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL REAL ESTATE)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ65
January 30, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen behind an unfinished housing subdivision in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards."REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE FOOTBALL)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ5R
January 29, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen next to farm fields in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL AGRICULTURE)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ5H
January 29, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen behind an unfinished housing subdivision in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT REAL ESTATE FOOTBALL CONSTRUCTION)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ5F
January 29, 2015
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate...
The University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, and the Westgate shopping mall are seen next to farm fields in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL AGRICULTURE)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ57
January 29, 2015
A sign for the Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
A sign for the Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super...
A sign for the Westgate shopping mall is seen near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL)
NFL-SUPER/
RTR4NJ56
January 29, 2015
People walk through the Westgate shopping mall near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super...
Glendale, UNITED STATES
People walk through the Westgate shopping mall near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super...
People walk through the Westgate shopping mall near the University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Super Bowl XLIX will be held on Sunday, in Glendale, Arizona January 29, 2015. Over the last decade or so, this city of 230,000 on Phoenix's northwest border, has reinvented itself from farm town to sports Mecca. There's the dome stadium where the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals play, the National Hockey League's Arizona Coyotes arena, and the new baseball facility where the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox appear every spring for their pre-season training. But Glendale's love of sports has come at a cost: red ink and jobs lost. All told, said Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, the town's sports fetish has produced "a house of cards." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SPORT FOOTBALL)
USA-FASHION/SISTERS
RTR3B5VC
December 03, 2012
Sister Pat N Leather, a member of the group The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, takes part in a charity...
San Francisco, UNITED STATES
Member of the group The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence takes part in a charity fashion show in San Francisco...
Sister Pat N Leather, a member of the group The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, takes part in a charity fashion show where designers are paired with Sisters to create fashions from recycled materials, in San Francisco, December 2, 2012. The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence (SPI) is a charity and street performance organization founded in 1979 which uses religious imagery to raise money for AIDS, LGBT-related causes, and mainstream community service organizations. Picture taken December 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jana Asenbrennerova (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT FASHION SOCIETY)
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