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Search results for: GPS-(Global-Positioning-System)

JAPAN-YAMAHA/ROBOTBIKE
RTX1UCKY
November 02, 2015
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Tokyo, Japan
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' at the 44th Tokyo Motor Show in Tokyo, Japan, November 2, 2015. Japanese motorcycle manufacturer Yamaha Motor showcased an autonomous 'robot motorcycle' at the motor show, where visitors stopped in their tracks to get a photo of the blue, sleek robot sitting on an equally sleek sports bike. The humanoid robot called 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' can analyse its location and route through a global positioning system (GPS) via satellite. It can travel as fast as 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles), and has two small protracted assist wheels either side to help keep its balance when riding at slower speeds of around 5 kilometers per hour. Yamaha says Motobot combines Yamaha's motorcycle and robotics technology. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
JAPAN-YAMAHA/ROBOTBIKE
RTX1UCKJ
November 02, 2015
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Tokyo, Japan
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' at the 44th Tokyo Motor Show in Tokyo, Japan, November 2, 2015. Japanese motorcycle manufacturer Yamaha Motor showcased an autonomous 'robot motorcycle' at the motor show, where visitors stopped in their tracks to get a photo of the blue, sleek robot sitting on an equally sleek sports bike. The humanoid robot called 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' can analyse its location and route through a global positioning system (GPS) via satellite. It can travel as fast as 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles), and has two small protracted assist wheels either side to help keep its balance when riding at slower speeds of around 5 kilometers per hour. Yamaha says Motobot combines Yamaha's motorcycle and robotics technology. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN-YAMAHA/ROBOTBIKE
RTX1UCKH
November 02, 2015
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Tokyo, Japan
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver....
Yamaha Motor Co Ltd's displays the company's prototype model of a motorcycle riding robot 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' at the 44th Tokyo Motor Show in Tokyo, Japan, November 2, 2015. Japanese motorcycle manufacturer Yamaha Motor showcased an autonomous 'robot motorcycle' at the motor show, where visitors stopped in their tracks to get a photo of the blue, sleek robot sitting on an equally sleek sports bike. The humanoid robot called 'MOTOBOT Ver. 1' can analyse its location and route through a global positioning system (GPS) via satellite. It can travel as fast as 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles), and has two small protracted assist wheels either side to help keep its balance when riding at slower speeds of around 5 kilometers per hour. Yamaha says Motobot combines Yamaha's motorcycle and robotics technology. REUTERS/Issei Kato
USA-UBER/
RTSDPF
September 09, 2015
An Uber driver's smartphone app is shown in this Uber vehicle en route to Washington Dulles International...
Dulles, UNITED STATES
An Uber driver's smartphone app en route to Washington Dulles International Airport
An Uber driver's smartphone app is shown in this Uber vehicle en route to Washington Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Virginia September 8, 2015. Picture taken September 8, 2015. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang
USA-ART/
RTX1BGDC
May 04, 2015
Artist Jim Bachor uses a global positioning system (GPS) locator for his mosaic art piece "Twin Lime...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Artist Jim Bachor uses a global positioning system (GPS) locator for his mosaic art piece "Twin Lime...
Artist Jim Bachor uses a global positioning system (GPS) locator for his mosaic art piece "Twin Lime Popsicles" that he installed in a street pothole in Chicago, Illinois, May 2, 2015. Bachor posts the exact coordinates to tag the picture on social media and his website so his followers can find its location in the city. Picture taken May 2, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young
TECH-ISRAEL/PARKING
RTR4QT3N
February 23, 2015
Anagog, an Israeli parking app, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration taken in Tel Aviv...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Anagog, an Israeli parking app, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration taken in Tel Aviv
Anagog, an Israeli parking app, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration taken in Tel Aviv February 18, 2015. When it comes to helping drivers, there's no shortage of in-car technology from GPS navigation to collision-warning systems. But now start-ups are tackling a perennial source of frustration -- finding a parking space. Picture taken February 18, 2015. To march TECH-ISRAEL/PARKING REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
FRANCE-MOTORWAY/
RTR4JTIH
January 01, 2015
A Coyote system is seen in a vehicle as it provides real-time information on speed limits, dangers locations,...
Toulouse, France
A Coyote system is seen in a vehicle as its provides real-time information along the A62 motorway in...
A Coyote system is seen in a vehicle as it provides real-time information on speed limits, dangers locations, traffic hazards and traffic conditions along the A62 motorway in Toulouse December 31, 2014. France's prime minister announced on Wednesday the creation in January of a work group to study the future of motorway concessions in the country. Picture taken December 31, 2014.
REUTERS/ Regis Duvignau (FRANCE - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA/
RTR3OZBV
May 13, 2014
A sensor is seen spinning atop a Google self-driving vehicle before a presentation at the Computer History...
Mountain View, UNITED STATES
A sensor is seen spinning atop a Google self-driving vehicle before a presentation at the Computer History...
A sensor is seen spinning atop a Google self-driving vehicle before a presentation at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California May 13, 2014. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
RUSSIA/
RTR3JSO9
April 03, 2014
Fitters of space apparatus work on the GLONASS-M space navigation satellite inside an assembly workshop...
Zheleznogorsk, Russia
Fitters of space apparatus work on GLONASS-M space navigation satellite inside assembly workshop of Reshetnev...
Fitters of space apparatus work on the GLONASS-M space navigation satellite inside an assembly workshop of the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems company in the Siberian town of Zheleznogorsk, some 50 km (31 miles) northeast of Krasnoyarsk, April 2, 2014. The Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) is a Russian satellite navigation system similar to the Global Positioning System (GPS) of the U.S., designed to serve for military and civil purposes. Picture taken April 2, 2014. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
Business
Business
Ride Service Uber - 03 Jan 2014
5 PICTURES
Animals
Animals
Seals Released with GPS Trackers in Canada - 21 Nov 2013
7 PICTURES
CANADA/
RTX15M1B
November 20, 2013
A pair of harbour seals wearing satellite linked transmitters on their heads face each after being released...
PORTEAU COVE, Canada
A pair of harbour seals wearing satellite linked transmitters face each after being released into the...
A pair of harbour seals wearing satellite linked transmitters on their heads face each after being released into the waters of Howe Sound in Porteau Cove, British Columbia November 20, 2013. The seals had received months of care at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre after being rescued from the wild. Wearing the transmitters will help track their movements after their release. REUTERS/Andy Clark (CANADA - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WV0
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUZ
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works on one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUY
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUX
July 24, 2013
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22,...
Paris, France
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory
View of the laser of the optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUW
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUU
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat works next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUT
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at the Paris...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
FRANCE-CLOCK/
RTX11WUS
July 24, 2013
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory...
Paris, France
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks in a laboratory at...
French physician Rodolphe Le Targat poses next to one of two optical lattice clocks (OLC) in a laboratory at the Paris Observatory July 22, 2013. France-based physicists have designed a clock whose use of laser beams to measure atomic vibrations makes it up to three times more accurate than atomic clocks and could lead to a more precise definition of the second. The team of five researchers at the Paris Observatory says the new timekeeper is so accurate it will neither gain nor lose a second over a period of 300 million years, against 100 million years for the atomic clocks around the world that set time. While such a high degree of precision may seem a scientist's fad, it could improve the resolution of global positioning systems (GPS), help smartphones download data faster and refine high-frequency trading on financial markets, already measured in microseconds (millionths of a second). Picture taken July 22, 2013. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
WAZE-FACEBOOK/
RTXZG7E
May 09, 2013
Waze, an Israeli mobile satellite navigation application, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Waze, an Israeli mobile satellite navigation application, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration...
Waze, an Israeli mobile satellite navigation application, is seen on a smartphone in this photo illustration taken in Tel Aviv May 9, 2013. Facebook Inc is in advanced talks to acquire Israeli mobile satellite navigation start-up Waze for $800 million to $1 billion, business daily Calcalist reported on Thursday. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
ABU-DHABI/
RTR3B17R
November 29, 2012
A GPS tracking device is seen on a falcon during the first day of the Abu Dhabi Falconry 400m competition...
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
A tracking device is seen on a falcon during the Abu Dhabi Falconry 400m competition in Abu Dhabi
A GPS tracking device is seen on a falcon during the first day of the Abu Dhabi Falconry 400m competition in Al Wathba, Abu Dhabi, November 29, 2012. The competition, known as "Al Tilwah" requires the falcons to take off from a starting point and fly the distance of 400m to catch their prey, which is held by a participant guiding the falcon at the finish line by waving a rope with the prey, usually quail, at the end of it. The event runs until December 3. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
FRANCE/
RTR32SMM
May 29, 2012
A French farmer looks at his GPS screen which displays satellite points as he works in his wheat field...
Chateaubriant, France
A farmer looks at his GPS screen which displays satellite points as he works in a wheat field in Chateaubriant...
A French farmer looks at his GPS screen which displays satellite points as he works in his wheat field using satellite-generated data to assist him in treating his crops in Chateaubriant May 29, 2012. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe (FRANCE - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULDB
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse passes a reward sign as he enters a pen of cattle headed...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse passes a reward sign as he enters a pen of cattle headed for auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULDA
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse points to a nearly invisible brand on a cow headed for auction...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse points to a nearly invisible brand on a cow headed for auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD9
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse searches for brands on cows headed for auction in Fort Collins,...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse searches for brands on cows headed for auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD8
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse draws a picture of the brand he found on a set of cattle...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse draws a picture of the brand he found on a set of cattle headed for auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD7
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over a sheet listing cattle headed for auction in...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over a sheet listing cattle headed for auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. The list shows (L-R) the names of cattle owners, the number of cattle being sold at the auction, the brands and ear tag numbers used by each owner and the date moved. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD6
November 28, 2011
Cattle headed for auction wait in pens in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Cattle headed for auction wait in pens in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD5
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD4
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD3
November 28, 2011
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort...
FORT COLLINS, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Colorado State Brand Inspector Jim Easthouse looks over cattle brands before a livestock auction in Fort Collins, Colorado November 9, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 9, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD2
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics checks an ear tag on a cow, which has just arrived from Montana,...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics checks an ear tag on a cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD1
November 28, 2011
Dallas Schleining of Schleining Genetics counts cows, which have just arrived on a truck (background)...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Dallas Schleining of Schleining Genetics counts cows, which have just arrived on a truck (background) from Montana, at his cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULD0
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics herds a 1,200 lb (544 kilograms) cow, which has just arrived...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics herds a 1,200 lb (544 kilograms) cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCZ
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCY
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCX
November 28, 2011
A freshly branded cow runs to a pen at a cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers,...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
A freshly branded cow runs to a pen at a cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCV
November 28, 2011
Smoke rises from a reverse K slash over two brands burnt into a cow, which has just arrived from Montana,...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Smoke rises from a reverse K slash over two brands burnt into a cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at a cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCU
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Photo taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCT
November 28, 2011
Dallas Schleining of Schleining Genetics herds cows, which have just arrived from Montana, at his cattle...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Dallas Schleining of Schleining Genetics herds cows, which have just arrived from Montana, at his cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCS
November 28, 2011
Cattle feed at the Schleining Genetics feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers,...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Cattle feed at the Schleining Genetics feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
CATTLE-RUSTLING/
RTR2ULCR
November 28, 2011
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at...
AULT, UNITED STATES
To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/
Nancy Schleining of Schleining Genetics brands a pregnant cow, which has just arrived from Montana, at her cattle feedlot in Ault, Colorado November 21, 2011. Cattle rustlers, casting aside saddle and spurs for modern horsepower, are roaming the West with four-wheel drive and GPS technology in a resurgence of livestock thievery considered a hanging offense on the old frontier. State livestock officials said the increase in cattle crimes was linked to the slumping economy, soaring beef prices and the advent of handheld global positioning systems that allow rustlers to more easily navigate the wide-open range. They said contemporary thieves may find it more convenient and lucrative to pick off a couple cows, worth as much as $2,000 a head, than to rob a convenience store. Picture taken November 21, 2011. To match Feature CATTLE-RUSTLING/ REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS BUSINESS)
SINGAPORE/
RTR2P9CB
July 25, 2011
Singapore's Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew looks at the vessel traffic information system at the Port...
Singapore, Singapore
Singapore's Transport Minister Lui looks at the vessel traffic information system at the Port Operations...
Singapore's Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew looks at the vessel traffic information system at the Port Operations Control Centre at Changi Naval Base, Singapore July 25, 2011. Singapore is the world's busiest port by vessel arrival tonnage with more than 127,000 vessels totalling 1.92 billion gross tons calling at its port last year, according to the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore. REUTERS/Tim Chong (SINGAPORE - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS MARITIME TRANSPORT)
ROMANIA/
RTR2MHXS
May 16, 2011
A GPS monitoring system is attached near the tail of a sturgeon measuring more than 2 metres (7 ft.)...
Tamadau, Romania
A GPS monitoring system is attached near the tail of a sturgeon measuring more than 2 metres (7 ft.)...
A GPS monitoring system is attached near the tail of a sturgeon measuring more than 2 metres (7 ft.) at a fish farm in the village of Tamadau, 40 km (25 miles) east of Bucharest May 16, 2011. Six sturgeons with GPS monitoring system attached will be released into Danube river to monitor their movements in their natural habitat during a Romanian-Norwegian project which aims to discover the route used by the fish to feed and reproduce. The sturgeons are an endangered species due the increased demand of caviar. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
SAFRICA-POACHING/
RTXUJCB
November 12, 2010
Rangers prepare to insert a GPS on an eight year old Rhino to keep track of its movements and attempts...
Mafikeng, South Africa
Rangers prepare to insert a GPS on an eight year old Rhino to keep track of its movements and attempts...
Rangers prepare to insert a GPS on an eight year old Rhino to keep track of its movements and attempts at poaching, at the Mafikeng Game Reserve in the North West province, November 12, 2010. Poaching in South Africa has increased this year owing to booming demand and rising prices for rhino horn from increasingly rich Asian markets, where it is used as a medicine.
The light-weight 40mm GPS device, possessing a life span of up to three years, is inserted into the horn and was placed into at least eight rhinos. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: ANIMALS CRIME LAW BUSINESS)
BRAZIL-FORESTRY/
RTXTBG0
October 11, 2010
A technician reads information, transmitted from a microchip attached to a tree, with his GPS device...
NOVA MUTUM, Brazil
To match Feature BRAZIL-FORESTRY/
A technician reads information, transmitted from a microchip attached to a tree, with his GPS device during a presentation of the Monitoring System Electronic Tracking and Forestry project in Nova Mutum in Mato Grosso state, midwestern Brazil, August 28, 2010. Each microchip, which is attached to a tree's base, holds data about its location, size and who cut it down. The chips allow land owners using sustainable forestry practices to distinguish their wood from that acquired through illegal logging that each year destroys swathes of the forest. Picture taken August 28, 2010. To match Feature BRAZIL-FORESTRY/ REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
BRAZIL-FORESTRY/
RTXTBFO
October 11, 2010
A technician reads information, transmitted from a microchip attached to a tree, with his GPS device...
NOVA MUTUM, Brazil
To match Feature BRAZIL-FORESTRY/
A technician reads information, transmitted from a microchip attached to a tree, with his GPS device during a presentation of the Monitoring System Electronic Tracking and Forestry project in Nova Mutum in Mato Grosso state, midwestern Brazil, August 28, 2010. Each microchip, which is attached to a tree's base, holds data about its location, size and who cut it down. The chips allow land owners using sustainable forestry practices to distinguish their wood from that acquired through illegal logging that each year destroys swathes of the forest. Picture taken August 28, 2010. To match Feature BRAZIL-FORESTRY/ REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
Oddly Enough
Oddly Enough
Putin's Dog Gets a Satellite Collar - 17 Oct 2008
12 PICTURES
GERMANY-WALL/
RTX7SCJ
July 09, 2008
A journalist holds a digital "Walk The Wall" Guide in Berlin July 9, 2008. Similar to audio guides devices...
Berlin, Germany
A journalist holds a digital "Walk The Wall" Guide in Berlin
A journalist holds a digital "Walk The Wall" Guide in Berlin July 9, 2008. Similar to audio guides devices found in museums, the 158-gram digital "Walk the Wall" guide covers 15 kilometres (9 miles) of Berlin and offers detailed descriptions, pictures, eye-witness interviews and film clips of various areas of where the Berlin Wall once stood. The Global Position System (GPS) link gives constant updates on a Berlin map -- complete with a blinking yellow box of the holder's exact location -- and includes a treasure trove of material on the Wall that divided Berlin for 28 years. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay (GERMANY)
USA-CRIME/GPS
RTX5NUQ
May 14, 2008
Joe Lucci, Deputy Commissioner in the Office of the Commissioner of Probation in the state of Massachusetts,...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA-CRIME/GPS
Joe Lucci, Deputy Commissioner in the Office of the Commissioner of Probation in the state of Massachusetts, holds a GPS ankle transmitter in Boston, Massachusetts May 5, 2008. Lucci oversees the Electronic Monitoring Program which uses GPS bracelets to track the movements of parolees, including sex offenders. To match feature USA-CRIME/GPS REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
RUSSIA/
RTR1Z2B3
April 03, 2008
Engineers work on the GLONASS K space satellite in the assembly area of the open joint-stock company...
Zheleznogorsk, Russia
Engineers work on the GLONASS K space satellite in Zheleznogorsk
Engineers work on the GLONASS K space satellite in the assembly area of the open joint-stock company Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems (formerly known as the NPO PM Applied Mechanics Institute) in the Siberian town of Zheleznogorsk, 50 km (31 miles) northeast of the Russian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 3, 2008. The GLONASS (Global Navigating Satellite System) is a Russian equivalent of the American Global Positioning System (GPS). REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA)
RUSSIA/
RTR1Z2AX
April 03, 2008
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in the assembly area of the open joint-stock company...
Zheleznogorsk, Russia
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in Zheleznogorsk
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in the assembly area of the open joint-stock company Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems (formerly known as the NPO PM Applied Mechanics Institute) in the Siberian town of Zheleznogorsk, 50 km (31 miles) northeast of the Russian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 3, 2008. The GLONASS (Global Navigating Satellite System) is a Russian equivalent of the American Global Positioning System (GPS). REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA)
RUSSIA/
RTR1Z2AH
April 03, 2008
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in the assembly shop of the open joint-stock company...
Zheleznogorsk, Russia
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in Zheleznogorsk
Engineers work on the GLONASS M space satellite in the assembly shop of the open joint-stock company Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems (formerly known as the NPO PM Applied Mechanics Institute) in the Siberian town of Zheleznogorsk, 50 km (31 miles) northeast of the Russian city of Krasnoyarsk, April 3, 2008. The GLONASS (Global Navigating Satellite System) is a Russian equivalent of the American Global Positioning System (GPS). REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin (RUSSIA)
TECH-SHOW/
RTX5AS1
January 07, 2008
A Tom Tom GO 920 T navigation system is displayed during the Digital Experience event at the Consumer...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
A Tom Tom GO 920 T navigation system is displayed during the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas
A Tom Tom GO 920 T navigation system is displayed during the Digital Experience event at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2008. The $599.99 system has a map share feature that allows consumers to update map information to Tom Tom for distribution to other Tom Tom users. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES)
TECH-SHOW/
RTX59DW
January 06, 2008
The Cobra Nav One 5000 portable mobile navigation system is displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
The Cobra Nav One 5000 portable mobile navigation system is displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show...
The Cobra Nav One 5000 portable mobile navigation system is displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) Unveiled event in Las Vegas, Nevada January 5, 2008. The just-released global positioning system (GPS) has the largest screen in the market, according to its manufacturer. The CES opens January 7. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES)
TAIWAN/
RTR1U0K0
September 19, 2007
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product...
Taipei, Taiwan
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product...
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product launch in Taipei September 19, 2007. The Global Positioning System or GPS device also features MP3 and movie capabilities and costs around NTD $12,800 ($385) per set. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (TAIWAN)
TAIWAN/
RTR1U0JW
September 19, 2007
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product...
Taipei, Taiwan
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product...
A model poses for photographers as she presents the Asus R600 personal navigation device during the product launch in Taipei September 19, 2007. The Global Positioning System or GPS device also features MP3 and movie capabilities and costs around NTD $12,800 ($385) per set. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (TAIWAN)
IRAQ/
RTR1TR9E
September 12, 2007
A U.S. soldier smokes next to an armoured vehicle before a night operation in southeast Baghdad September...
Baghdad, Iraq
A U.S. soldier smokes next to an armoured vehicle before a night operation in southeast Baghdad
A U.S. soldier smokes next to an armoured vehicle before a night operation in southeast Baghdad September 12, 2007. The image below the soldier's face is a reflection of a GPS unit's screen, as seen from inside a vehicle. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (IRAQ)
USA/
RTR1SKUH
August 07, 2007
Model Kira Burgess wears a backpack outfitted with a microcontroller and a Global Positioning System...
San Diego, UNITED STATES
Model Kira Burgess wears backpack outfitted with microcontroller and GPS unit during a fashion exhibition...
Model Kira Burgess wears a backpack outfitted with a microcontroller and a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit that downloads recent news of bombings in Baghdad, Iraq, with their relative locations superimposed onto a map of Boston, during a fashion exhibition at SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group for Computer GRAPHics) 2007 in San Diego, California August 6, 2007. The backpack would "detonate" and release a compressed cloud of confetti when the wearer's location correlates to a site of violence in Baghdad. The exhibition showcased innovated and interactive works in fashion inspired by new technology by international designers. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES)
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