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Search results for: Gagged

SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHND
June 30, 2015
A man wearing a mask with a tape over the mouth holds up a sign during a protest against the Spanish...
Gijon, Spain
A man wearing a mask with a tape over the mouth holds up a sign during a protest against the Spanish...
A man wearing a mask with a tape over the mouth holds up a sign during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law in Gijon, northern Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect on July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The sign reads: "Not to gag law". REUTERS/Eloy Alonso
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHJ6
June 30, 2015
A woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central...
Madrid, Spain
Woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central...
A woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads, "They do not shut us up". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHJ5
June 30, 2015
A woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central...
Madrid, Spain
Woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central...
A woman with her mouth taped attends a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHIU
June 30, 2015
Demonstrators with their mouths taped stand next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators with their mouths taped stand next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish...
Demonstrators with their mouths taped stand next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish parliament, whose mouth is taped, during a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banners read, "Democracy here and in Greece" (L) and "Freedom of expression". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHIT
June 30, 2015
Demonstrators with their mouths taped attend a protest against Spanish government's new security law...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators with their mouths taped attend a protest against Spanish government's new security law...
Demonstrators with their mouths taped attend a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banners read, "Democracy here and in Greece" (L) and "Freedom of expression". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHIQ
June 30, 2015
A demonstrator with his mouth taped stands next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrator with his mouth taped stands next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish...
A demonstrator with his mouth taped stands next to a lion statue, resembling those outside the Spanish parliament, whose mouth is taped, during a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads, "No to the gag laws". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHIG
June 30, 2015
A woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security...
A woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banners read, "Freedom of expression". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IHI8
June 30, 2015
A woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security...
A woman, with her mouth taped, wears a mask during a protest against Spanish government's new security law in central Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads, "Freedom of expression". REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IEDJ
June 30, 2015
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June...
Madrid, Spain
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads "Protest is a right". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IEC7
June 30, 2015
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June...
Madrid, Spain
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads "Protest is a right". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IEBC
June 30, 2015
Firemen talk to Greenpeace activists hanging with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament...
Madrid, Spain
Firemen talk to Greenpeace activists hanging with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament...
Firemen talk to Greenpeace activists hanging with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads "Protest is a right". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IE72
June 30, 2015
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June...
Madrid, Spain
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorized street protests, comes into effect July 1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner reads "Protest is a right". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1IE59
June 30, 2015
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June...
Madrid, Spain
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid
Greenpeace activists hang with a banner from a crane above the Spanish parliament in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2015. Spanish government's new security law, which toughens fines for unauthorised street protests, comes into effect July1. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). Banner reads "Protest is a right". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4YXEM
June 25, 2015
An activist with a taped mouth speaks on a mobile phone during a protest against Spain's "Ley Mordaza"...
Bilbao, Spain
An activist with a taped mouth speaks on a mobile phone during a protest against Spain's "Ley Mordaza"...
An activist with a taped mouth speaks on a mobile phone during a protest against Spain's "Ley Mordaza" in Bilbao, Spain, June 25, 2015. Spain's Ley de Seguridad Ciudadana (Law on Public Security), known by its detractors as the Ley Mordaza or Gag Law, comes into effect on July 1. The law toughens fines on activists who take part in unauthorised protests, interrupt public events, or publish images of the police, according to local media. REUTERS/Vincent West
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTX1D467
May 15, 2015
A man with a mask attends a gathering to mark the fourth anniversary of the 15M movement at Madrid's...
Madrid, Spain
Man with a mask attends a gathering to mark the fourth anniversary of the 15M movement at Madrid's landmark...
A man with a mask attends a gathering to mark the fourth anniversary of the 15M movement at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol Square, Spain, May 15, 2015. The movement gathered steam as part of the "Indignados" (Indignant) protests against the government's spending cuts and failure to revive the moribund economy, inspiring "Occupy" movements around the globe. The words on the mask read, "No to the gag law = Fascism". REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4WVD8
April 10, 2015
The holographic image of a demonstrator is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against the...
Madrid, Spain
The holographic image of a demonstrator is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against the...
The holographic image of a demonstrator is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law in Madrid April 10, 2015. The new security law toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4WVD2
April 10, 2015
A projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain’s Parliament during a protest against...
Madrid, Spain
Projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain’s Parliament during a protest against...
A projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain’s Parliament during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law in Madrid April 10, 2015. The new security law toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The sign reads, "No to censorship". REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4WVD1
April 10, 2015
A projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against...
Madrid, Spain
Projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against...
A projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's Parliament during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law in Madrid April 10, 2015. The new security law toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4WVCZ
April 10, 2015
A police officer (C) stands guard as a projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's...
Madrid, Spain
Police officer stands guard as a projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's...
A police officer (C) stands guard as a projection of images of people demonstrating is seen outside Spain's Parliament, during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law in Madrid April 10, 2015. The new security law toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banners read, "We are not a crime", "Freedom of expression". REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XW
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XV
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. The banner reads: "R.I.P freedom of speech". REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XU
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. The banners read: "R.I.P human rights", "R.I.P freedom of speech". REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XT
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. The banner reads: "Good-bye, democracy". REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XR
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XP
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XN
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Susana Vera TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4V1XK
March 26, 2015
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Protesters, with their mouths taped, stage a protest against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), in central Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament Thursday afternoon, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1EG
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front L) and Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz and Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front L) and Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria (front R) attend a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1CV
March 26, 2015
Spain's opposition Socialist Party (PSOE) leader Pedro Sanchez arrives for the debate of the Spanish...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's opposition Socialist Party (PSOE) leader Pedro Sanchez arrives for the debate at Parliament in...
Spain's opposition Socialist Party (PSOE) leader Pedro Sanchez arrives for the debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1CS
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz attends a debate of the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz attends a debate at Parliament in Madrid
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz attends a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1CF
March 26, 2015
Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria attends a debate of the Spanish government's...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria attends a debate at Parliament in Madrid
Spain's Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria attends a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1CD
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (L) yawns as he talks on his phone next to Spain's Justice...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz yawns as he talks on his phone next to Spain's Justice...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (L) yawns as he talks on his phone next to Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1CB
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (L) and Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala attend...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz and Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala attend a debate...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (L) and Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala attend a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4V1BU
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate of the Spanish government's...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate at Parliament in Madrid...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill has been approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZSA
March 26, 2015
United Left party member Ricardo Sixto holds a poster against the Spanish government's new security law,...
Madrid, Spain
United Left party member Ricardo Sixto holds a poster against the Spanish government's new security law,...
United Left party member Ricardo Sixto holds a poster against the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. Banner depicting Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz reads "Free Holograms We are no crime".REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZRY
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front) greets Juan Jose Cortes (R), father of five-year-old...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz greets Juan Jose Cortes in front of Maria del Mar Bermudez...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front) greets Juan Jose Cortes (R), father of five-year-old Mari Luz Cortes who was murdered in 2008, in front of Maria del Mar Bermudez (C) and Francisco Palo, parents of Sandra Palo who was murdered in 2003, during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZQL
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (R) talks to Maria del Mar Blanco, sister of assassinated...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz talks to Maria del Mar Blanco, sister of assassinated...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (R) talks to Maria del Mar Blanco, sister of assassinated PP councillor Miguel Angel Blanco, during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZPT
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz reacts during a debate of the Spanish government's new...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz reacts during a debate of the Spanish government's new...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz reacts during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZPQ
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate of the Spanish government's...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate of the Spanish government's...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz delivers a speech during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZPO
March 26, 2015
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front L) and other party members applaud Justice Minister...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz and other party members applaud Justice Minister Rafael...
Spain's Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz (front L) and other party members applaud Justice Minister Rafael Catala (front R) during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-POLITICS/
RTR4UZPE
March 26, 2015
Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala (R) delivers a speech next to Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez...
Madrid, Spain
Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala delivers a speech next to Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz...
Spain's Justice Minister Rafael Catala (R) delivers a speech next to Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez Diaz during a debate of the Spanish government's new security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), at Parliament in Madrid March 26, 2015. The bill is expected to be approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament later today, despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Andrea Comas
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4UBCL
March 21, 2015
A protester has his mouth tapped against the new Spanish security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"),...
Maadrid, Spain
A protester has his mouth tapped against the new Spanish security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"),...
A protester has his mouth tapped against the new Spanish security law, known as "Ley Mordaza" ("Gag Law"), during an anti-austerity demonstration in central Madrid March 21, 2015. REUTERS/Sergio Perez
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4PKAX
February 14, 2015
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's...
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest security law, known as "Ley Mordaza", in Madrid February 14, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament on December 11, 2014 despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Sergio Perez (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4PKAJ
February 14, 2015
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's...
Demonstrators wear masks reading "Don't speak, Gag Law" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest security law, known as "Ley Mordaza", in Madrid February 14, 2015. The bill was approved by the conservative-led Spanish parliament on December 11, 2014 despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. REUTERS/Sergio Perez (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4ISFD
December 20, 2014
Demonstrators hold a banner reading "No gag will make us shut up; defend our rights" during a protest...
Barcelona, Spain
Demonstrators hold a banner during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest law in...
Demonstrators hold a banner reading "No gag will make us shut up; defend our rights" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest security law in Barcelona December 20, 2014. A demonstration against Spain's new "Ley Mordaza" anti-protest bill was held on Saturday following its approval by the conservative-led Spanish parliament on December 11 despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. The bill will go to the senate next where it is expected to pass as the ruling People's Party also has a majority in the upper house. REUTERS/Gustau Nacarino (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CRIME LAW)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4ISDN
December 20, 2014
Demonstrators hold a sign reading "gag" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest...
Barcelona, Spain
Demonstrators hold a sign reading "gag" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest...
Demonstrators hold a sign reading "gag" during a protest against the Spanish government's new anti-protest security law in Barcelona December 20, 2014. A demonstration against Spain's new "Ley Mordaza" anti-protest bill was held on Saturday following its approval by the conservative-led Spanish parliament on December 11 despite heavy opposition from some politicians and activist groups, who say the law violates the right to protest, limits freedom of expression and gives more power to police. The bill will go to the senate next where it is expected to pass as the ruling People's Party also has a majority in the upper house. REUTERS/Gustau Nacarino (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CRIME LAW)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ5U
December 10, 2014
A demonstrator takes part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrator takes part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
A demonstrator takes part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ5Q
December 10, 2014
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ5L
December 10, 2014
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labeled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The placard reads "fear". REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ5F
December 10, 2014
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ5D
December 10, 2014
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The banner on the ground reads "Fear". REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SPAIN-PROTEST/
RTR4HJ55
December 10, 2014
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Madrid, Spain
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security...
Demonstrators take part in a mock funeral during a protest against the Spanish government's new security law at Madrid's landmark Puerta del Sol square December 10, 2014. The new security law, which will be voted on at Spanish Parliament Thursday December 11, toughens fines for unauthorised street protests. Critics consider it a violation of the right to protest and a limit to free expression and have labelled it "Ley Mordaza" (Gag Law). The piece of paper reads "We are not a crime". REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
ATHLETICS-EUROPEAN/
RTR4233J
August 12, 2014
Andrei Gag of Romania competes in the men's shot put qualifying round during the European Athletics Championships...
Zurich, Switzerland
Gag of Romania competes in men's shot put qualifying round during European Athletics Championships in...
Andrei Gag of Romania competes in the men's shot put qualifying round during the European Athletics Championships at the Letzigrund Stadium in Zurich August 12, 2014. REUTERS/Phil Noble (SWITZERLAND - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS)
SPAIN/
RTR3Y7Z8
July 11, 2014
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July...
Madrid, Spain
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July 11, 2014. After warnings from the Spanish judicial authorities, the conservative government of Mariano Rajoy approved a controversial bill, although softened from the initial text, that maintained stiff penalties for unauthorized rallies considering that there is a safety risk. The placard (top R) reads "They won't shut us up". REUTERS/Javier Barbancho (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
SPAIN/
RTR3Y7YQ
July 11, 2014
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July...
Madrid, Spain
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July 11, 2014. After warnings from the Spanish judicial authorities, the conservative government of Mariano Rajoy approved a controversial bill, although softened from the initial text, that maintained stiff penalties for unauthorized rallies considering that there is a safety risk. The placard reads "Censorship". REUTERS/Javier Barbancho (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
SPAIN/
RTR3Y7XY
July 11, 2014
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July...
Madrid, multiple countries
A woman sporting a gag protests against new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid
A woman sporting a gag protests against a new law for policing demonstrations, in central Madrid July 11, 2014. After warnings from the Spanish judicial authorities, the conservative government of Mariano Rajoy approved a controversial bill, although softened from the initial text, that maintained stiff penalties for unauthorized rallies considering that there is a safety risk .REUTERS/Javier Barbancho (SPAIN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-WORLDCUP/
RTR3P79V
May 14, 2014
A teacher poses with a mock gag as children sit at what is meant to represent a public school classroom,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Protest against the 2014 World Cup, organised by NGO Rio de Paz at the Jacarezinho slum in Rio de Janeiro...
A teacher poses with a mock gag as children sit at what is meant to represent a public school classroom, during a protest against the 2014 World Cup, organised by non-governmental organisation (NGO) Rio de Paz (Rio of Peace) at the Jacarezinho slum in Rio de Janeiro May 14, 2014. The protest was held to spread awareness about the need for the standard of Brazil's education system to be raised to that of its preparations for the World Cup, according to the organisation. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP EDUCATION CIVIL UNREST POVERTY)
SPAIN/
RTX16IMZ
December 14, 2013
A demonstrator wears tape over his mouth as he stands near the Parliament building during a protest against...
Madrid, Spain
A demonstrator wears tape over his mouth as he stands near the Parliament building during a protest against...
A demonstrator wears tape over his mouth as he stands near the Parliament building during a protest against a new security law in Madrid December 14, 2013. Spain's conservative government agreed on November 29, 2013 to toughen penalties for unauthorised street protests up to a possible 600,000 euro ($816,000) fine, a crackdown that belies the peaceful record of the anti-austerity protests of recent years. The placards read: "Gag rule, democracy" (front R) and "Gag rule, shameless dictatorship" (front L). REUTERS/Sergio Perez (SPAIN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
Sport Profile
Sport Profile
Aaron Hernandez - 10 Oct 2013
20 PICTURES
WALMART-MEETING/
RTX10FGC
June 07, 2013
Actor Hugh Jackman (L) performs a gag with a Sam's Club employee as he hosts the annual shareholders...
Fayetteville, UNITED STATES
Hugh Jackman hosts the annual shareholders meeting for Walmart in Fayetteville, Arkansas
Actor Hugh Jackman (L) performs a gag with a Sam's Club employee as he hosts the annual shareholders meeting for Walmart in Fayetteville, Arkansas June 7, 2013. Wal-Mart Stores Inc's board approved a $15 billion stock repurchase plan, its first in two years, the world's largest retailer announced at its annual meeting on Friday. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS ENTERTAINMENT)
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