Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Gloom

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ISRAEL-SCREAM
RTX9218X
February 09, 2021
People take part in a screaming session as they seek emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
RA'ANANA, Israel
To lift lockdown gloom, Israelis keep calm and carry on screaming
People take part in a screaming session as they seek emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) confinements, in an open area near Ra'anana, Israel February 7, 2021. Picture taken February 7, 2021. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ISRAEL-SCREAM
RTX9218W
February 09, 2021
A woman takes part in a screaming session with a group seeking emotional release from coronavirus disease...
RA'ANANA, Israel
To lift lockdown gloom, Israelis keep calm and carry on screaming
A woman takes part in a screaming session with a group seeking emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) confinements, in an open area near Ra'anana, Israel February 7, 2021. Picture taken February 7, 2021. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ISRAEL-SCREAM
RTX9217V
February 09, 2021
People take part in a screaming session as they seek emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
RA'ANANA, Israel
To lift lockdown gloom, Israelis keep calm and carry on screaming
People take part in a screaming session as they seek emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) confinements, in an open area near Ra'anana, Israel February 7, 2021. Picture taken February 7, 2021. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ISRAEL-SCREAM
RTX9217U
February 09, 2021
People who meet and take part in a screaming sessions as they seek emotional release from coronavirus...
RA'ANANA, Israel
To lift lockdown gloom, Israelis keep calm and carry on screaming
People who meet and take part in a screaming sessions as they seek emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) confinements, walk through an orchard near Ra'anana, Israel February 7, 2021. Picture taken February 7, 2021. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ISRAEL-SCREAM
RTX9217T
February 09, 2021
A man takes part in a screaming session with a group seeking emotional release from coronavirus disease...
RA'ANANA, Israel
To lift lockdown gloom, Israelis keep calm and carry on screaming
A man takes part in a screaming session with a group seeking emotional release from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) confinements, in an open area near Ra'anana, Israel February 7, 2021. Picture taken February 7, 2021. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Queen Elizabeth knights 100-year-old fundraising captain
20 PICTURES
CHINA-GREATWALL/
RTS179VF
June 15, 2017
At one of the most treacherous and least restored stretches of China's Great Wall, a line of pack mules...
Beijing, China
The Wider Image: Rebuilding the Great Wall of China
At one of the most treacherous and least restored stretches of China's Great Wall, a line of pack mules halted upon emerging from the gloom of a dense forest draped in mist and dew. Laden with 150 kg (330 pounds) of bricks each, the seven animals finally got moving in response to the coaxing and swearing of their masters, eager to gain altitude before the sun climbed high in the sky. For more than a decade, mules have been crucial in the effort to restore Jiankou, a serpentine 20-km (12-mile) section of the wall about 70 km (44 miles) north of central Beijing that is notorious for its ridges and perilous slopes. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj SEARCH "SAGOLJ GREAT WALL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CHINA-GREATWALL/
USA-ELECTION/DELEGATES
RTSK4R5
July 28, 2016
Florida volunteer Alvin Peters poses for a photograph at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: U.S. elections: messages for the future president
Florida volunteer Alvin Peters poses for a photograph at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States July 26, 2016. Peters' message to the presidential nominee is: "Spread the joy; dispel the doom and gloom." REUTERS/Jim Young SEARCH "DELEGATES CONVENTIONS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
GLOBAL-MARKETS/
RTX22AZQ
January 14, 2016
People are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage...
Tokyo, Japan
People are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage...
People are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage in Tokyo, Japan January 14, 2016. Asian shares skidded on Thursday in the wake of steep losses on Wall Street, while a rout in oil and commodities prices, with crude plumbing 12-year lows, heightened fears about the global economy. Japan's Nikkei cratered 3.9 percent, as downbeat domestic data added to the gloom. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
GLOBAL-MARKETS/
RTX22AZO
January 14, 2016
Businessmen are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage...
Tokyo, Japan
Businessmen are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage...
Businessmen are reflected in an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei share average outside a brokerage in Tokyo, Japan January 14, 2016. Asian shares skidded on Thursday in the wake of steep losses on Wall Street, while a rout in oil and commodities prices, with crude plumbing 12-year lows, heightened fears about the global economy. Japan's Nikkei cratered 3.9 percent, as downbeat domestic data added to the gloom. REUTERS/Toru Hanai TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIFX
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's coach Myron Markevych speaks to Artem Fedetskiy during a training session at the team's training...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's coach Markevych speaks to Fedetskiy during training session at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk...
Dnipro's coach Myron Markevych speaks to Artem Fedetskiy during a training session at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIFW
May 25, 2015
A man visits the Dnipro team's shop in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
A man visits the Dnipro team's shop in Dnipropetrovsk
A man visits the Dnipro team's shop in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIFD
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's Artem Fedetskiy (C) and his team mates take part in a training session at the team's training...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's Fedetskiy and his team mates take part in training session at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk...
Dnipro's Artem Fedetskiy (C) and his team mates take part in a training session at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIF6
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's Yevhen Konoplyanka (C) and Jaba Kankava (L) take part in a training session at the team's training...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's Konoplyanka and Kankava take part in training session at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk...
Dnipro's Yevhen Konoplyanka (C) and Jaba Kankava (L) take part in a training session at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIEX
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's Artem Fedetskiy (front) and his team mates take part in a training session at the team's training...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's Fedetskiy and his team mates take part in training session at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk...
Dnipro's Artem Fedetskiy (front) and his team mates take part in a training session at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIEM
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's coach Myron Markevych attends a news conference at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk,...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's coach Myron Markevych attends news conference at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk
Dnipro's coach Myron Markevych attends a news conference at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
SOCCER-EUROPA/DNIPRO
RTX1EIEI
May 25, 2015
Dnipro's Bruno Gama (L), Artem Fedetskiy (C) and Valeriy Fedorchuk take part in a training session at...
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Dnipro's Gama, Fedetskiy and Fedorchuk take part in training session at team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk...
Dnipro's Bruno Gama (L), Artem Fedetskiy (C) and Valeriy Fedorchuk take part in a training session at the team's training camp in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, May 22, 2015. Win or lose, Ukrainian outsiders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk are banking on being able to lift some of the gloom in their war-weary country when they face holders Sevilla in Wednesday's Europa League final in Warsaw. Picture taken on May 22, 2015. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
INDIA-GOLD/DEMAND
RTX1EACH
May 24, 2015
A salesman helps a customer (R) to select gold bangles at a jewelry showroom in Mumbai, India, May 21,...
Mumbai, India
A salesman helps a customer to select gold bangles at a jewelry showroom in Mumbai
A salesman helps a customer (R) to select gold bangles at a jewelry showroom in Mumbai, India, May 21, 2015. As India meets most of its gold requirements through imports, dwindling local purchases during what should typically be the peak season will dent global prices of the metal, with a looming hike in U.S. interest rates and slower demand from No.2 consumer China further adding to the gloom. To match INDIA-GOLD/DEMAND Picture taken May 21, 2015. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade
IRAN-NUCLEAR/
RTR4VHQV
March 30, 2015
A member of the Iranian media walks on a chess board at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne March...
Lausanne, Switzerland
A member of the Iranian media walks on a chess board at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne
A member of the Iranian media walks on a chess board at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne March 30, 2015. Iran and major powers were struggling on Monday to reach a preliminary nuclear accord as "gloom" set in, with both sides sticking to their positions a day before a self-imposed deadline. For days Iran, the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China have been trying to break an impasse in negotiations aimed at stopping Tehran having the capacity to develop a nuclear bomb, in exchange for an easing of United Nations sanctions that are crippling its economy. REUTERS/Brendan Smialowski/Pool
IRAN-NUCLEAR/
RTR4VHGY
March 30, 2015
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) talks to British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond in the Olympic...
Lausanne, Switzerland
US Secretary of State Kerry talks to British Foreign Secretary Hammond in the Olympic Garden in a break...
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) talks to British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond in the Olympic Garden next to the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in a break during Iran nuclear program talks in Lausanne March 30, 2015. Iran and major powers were struggling on Monday to reach a preliminary nuclear accord as "gloom" set in, with both sides sticking to their positions a day before a self-imposed deadline. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SWITZERLAND-TRAVEL/
RTR4O3NH
February 03, 2015
Spectators take pictures as hot air balloons are gathered on the frozen Upper Lake for the traditional...
Arosa, Switzerland
Hot air balloons are gathered on the Upper Lake for the traditional glooming during International Balloon...
Spectators take pictures as hot air balloons are gathered on the frozen Upper Lake for the traditional glooming during International Balloon Week in the Swiss alpine resort of Arosa, February 3, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (SWITZERLAND - Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-PROPERTY/PRICES
RTR4IIKO
December 18, 2014
A labourer works at a construction site for a new building in Beijing December 17, 2014. China's new...
Beijing, China
A labourer works at a construction site for a new building in Beijing
A labourer works at a construction site for a new building in Beijing December 17, 2014. China's new home prices fell again in November and a business survey showed a deep drop in real estate investment plans, adding gloom to a slumping property market that has so far defied government efforts to revive it. Picture taken on December 17.
REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE)
CHINA-PROPERTY/PRICES
RTR4IIKA
December 18, 2014
Labourers work at a construction site for a new building in Beijing December 17, 2014. China's new home...
Beijing, China
Labourers work at a construction site for a new building in Beijing
Labourers work at a construction site for a new building in Beijing December 17, 2014. China's new home prices fell again in November and a business survey showed a deep drop in real estate investment plans, adding gloom to a slumping property market that has so far defied government efforts to revive it. Picture taken on December 17.
REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE)
CHINA-PROPERTY/PRICES
RTR4IICK
December 18, 2014
Cranes are silhouetted in front of the setting sun at a construction site for a new residential and commercial...
Beijing, China
Cranes are silhouetted in front of the setting sun at a construction site for a new residential and commercial...
Cranes are silhouetted in front of the setting sun at a construction site for a new residential and commercial complex in Beijing December 18, 2014. China's new home prices fell again in November and a business survey showed a deep drop in real estate investment plans, adding gloom to a slumping property market that has so far defied government efforts to revive it.
REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFT
November 01, 2013
Customers stand in line to buy silver biscuits outside a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras,...
Mumbai, India
Customers stand in line to buy silver biscuits outside a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras,...
Customers stand in line to buy silver biscuits outside a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFQ
November 01, 2013
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a...
Mumbai, India
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFP
November 01, 2013
A customer speaks to the owner of a silver and jewellery shop on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival...
Mumbai, India
A customer speaks to the owner of a silver and jewellery shop on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival...
A customer speaks to the owner of a silver and jewellery shop on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFN
November 01, 2013
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
Mumbai, India
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
An employee shows gold bangles to a customer at jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFM
November 01, 2013
A customer buys silver biscuits in a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival...
Mumbai, India
A customer buys silver biscuits in a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival...
A customer buys silver biscuits in a jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFJ
November 01, 2013
An employee stands guard outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
Mumbai, India
An employee stands guard outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
An employee stands guard outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
INDIA-GOLD/
RTX14WFF
November 01, 2013
Customers stand in line outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
Mumbai, India
Customers stand in line outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu...
Customers stand in line outside a silver and jewellery showroom on the occasion of Dhanteras, a Hindu festival associated with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, at a market in Mumbai November 1, 2013. A scarcity of gold and high prices are pushing Indians to look to silver or diamond jewellery as alternative gifts this festive season, adding to the gloom in the gold trade after government measures to restrict imports. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS RELIGION)
ECONOMY-GLOBAL/WEEKAHEAD
RTX13E0M
September 09, 2013
A view of the city's skyline from the Beijing Yintai Centre building at sunset is seen in Beijing, August...
Beijing, China
A view of the city's skyline from the Beijing Yintai Centre building at sunset is seen in Beijing
A view of the city's skyline from the Beijing Yintai Centre building at sunset is seen in Beijing, August 29, 2013. An expected short-term rebound in China's slowing economy is unlikely to dispel the gloom that has engulfed emerging markets and abruptly made them the No. 1 worry for the global economy. Picture taken on August 29, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CITYSCAPE POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
Cannes Film Festival 2013
Cannes Film Festival 2013
Day One: Photocalls and News Conferences - 15 May 2013
48 PICTURES
Cannes Film Festival 2013
Cannes Film Festival 2013
Jury Members Arrive - 15 May 2013
12 PICTURES
SPAIN-BANKS/
RTXYZKO
April 25, 2013
A man walks past a Santander bank branch in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest...
Madrid, Spain
A man walks past a Santander bank branch in Madrid
A man walks past a Santander bank branch in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. The bank, which relies on South America for about half its profit, missed analysts' forecasts as lending in continental Europe shrank and lower interest rates ate into margins. Santander is one of Spain's healthier lenders and survived a real estate market crash without state help. REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
SPAIN-BANKS/
RTXYZKN
April 25, 2013
A man uses an ATM machine as another enters a Santander bank branch in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander,...
Madrid, Spain
A man uses an ATM machine as another enters a Santander bank branch in Madrid
A man uses an ATM machine as another enters a Santander bank branch in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. The bank, which relies on South America for about half its profit, missed analysts' forecasts as lending in continental Europe shrank and lower interest rates ate into margins. Santander is one of Spain's healthier lenders and survived a real estate market crash without state help. REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTXYZJV
April 25, 2013
Pedestrians walk past a branch of Santander in Wilmslow, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander,...
Wilmslow, United Kingdom
Pedestrians walk past a branch of Santander in Wilmslow
Pedestrians walk past a branch of Santander in Wilmslow, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTXYZJR
April 25, 2013
A sign is seen outside a branch of Santander in Wilmslow, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander,...
Wilmslow, United Kingdom
A sign is seen outside a branch of Santander in Wilmslow
A sign is seen outside a branch of Santander in Wilmslow, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTXYZJO
April 25, 2013
A man walks past a branch of Santander in Knutsford, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander, the...
multiple cities, United Kingdom
A man walks past a branch of Santander in Knutsford
A man walks past a branch of Santander in Knutsford, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTXYZJJ
April 25, 2013
Women use a cash machine outside a branch of Santander in Bramhall, northern England, April 25, 2013....
BRAMHALL, United Kingdom
Women use a cash machine outside a branch of Santander in Bramhall
Women use a cash machine outside a branch of Santander in Bramhall, northern England, April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
SPAIN-BANKS/
RTXYZE0
April 25, 2013
A man looks at his phone on the steps of a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro...
Madrid, Samoa
A man looks at his phone on steps of a Santander bank in Madrid
A man looks at his phone on the steps of a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. The bank, which relies on South America for about half its profit, missed analysts' forecasts as lending in continental Europe shrank and lower interest rates ate into margins.
Santander is one of Spain's healthier lenders and survived a real estate market crash without state help. REUTERS/Paul Hanna (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
SPAIN-BANKS/
RTXYZDW
April 25, 2013
People walk past a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank,...
Madrid, Spain
People walk by a Santander bank in Madrid
People walk past a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. The bank, which relies on South America for about half its profit, missed analysts' forecasts as lending in continental Europe shrank and lower interest rates ate into margins.
Santander is one of Spain's healthier lenders and survived a real estate market crash without state help. REUTERS/Paul Hanna (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
SPAIN-BANKS/
RTXYZDS
April 25, 2013
People walk past a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank,...
Madrid, Spain
People walk by a Santander bank in Madrid
People walk past a Santander bank in Madrid April 25, 2013. Santander, the euro zone's largest bank, reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net profit as slowing growth in some South American markets added to the gloom at home in Spain. The bank, which relies on South America for about half its profit, missed analysts' forecasts as lending in continental Europe shrank and lower interest rates ate into margins.
Santander is one of Spain's healthier lenders and survived a real estate market crash without state help. REUTERS/Paul Hanna (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)
POPE-SUCCESSION-BLACK-SMOKE
RTR3EWB0
March 12, 2013
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has...
Vatican City, Vatican City
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has...
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has been made after the first day of voting for the election of a new pope, in the Vatican City March 12, 2013. Thick black smoke billowed into the night sky from the Sistine Chapel's chimney on Tuesday, signalling an inconclusive first vote in the conclave to elect a new pope at a time of strife and scandal for the Roman Catholic Church. Thousands of faithful huddled in St. Peter's Square to watch the smoke pour out of the narrow flue in the rain-laden gloom following a day rich in ritual and pageantry. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE-SUCCESSION-BLACK-SMOKE
RTR3EWAW
March 12, 2013
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has...
Vatican City, Vatican City
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has...
Black smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, indicating that no decision has been made after the first day of voting for the election of a new pope, in the Vatican City March 12, 2013. Thick black smoke billowed into the night sky from the Sistine Chapel's chimney on Tuesday, signalling an inconclusive first vote in the conclave to elect a new pope at a time of strife and scandal for the Roman Catholic Church. Thousands of faithful huddled in St. Peter's Square to watch the smoke pour out of the narrow flue in the rain-laden gloom following a day rich in ritual and pageantry. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
CHAMPAGNE-MARKETS/
RTR3BTDZ
December 21, 2012
Wine merchant Gerard Mettler works in his wine shop in Paris December 21, 2012. Depressed by weak economies...
Paris, France
Wine merchant Gerard Mettler works in his wine shop in Paris
Wine merchant Gerard Mettler works in his wine shop in Paris December 21, 2012. Depressed by weak economies and the lingering shadow of a sovereign debt crisis, Europeans are struggling to find good reasons to crack open the bubbly. The European gloom means that after two years of increases, producers will dispatch about 9 million fewer bottles of champagne worldwide in 2012, a 3 percent drop to around 314 million, industry estimates gathered by Reuters showed. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD)
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 8